Want or Need a Book We Don’t Have?

Both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library have hundreds of books combined. Though our collection is quite extensive and filled with every kind of book, there’s no possible way to have every single book in the world ever published. So thankfully we have a service called Inter-library loan.

Our ILL service gives our members access to a much wider range of materials than normally possible.

 

WHO CAN USE OUR ILL SERVICE?

Any patron in good standing who has a membership that includes borrowing privileges.

 

WHAT CAN BE BORROWED?

Books, audio-books, movies, seasons, etc.

 

WHAT’S THE COST?

If we can get the item from within our state, there isn’t a charge!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occasionally, we won’t be able to find an item and in this case any item received from out of state will carry a postage charge that depends on the material’s size and its weight. You are able to specify whether you’d like to avoid charges at the time of your request.

 

BEFORE PLACING A REQUEST:

If the desired material is part of our Library’s current collection, we will not borrow it from another library.

However, if we have a title in Large Print and you would like it to be in regular print, we are able to borrow the title that way. As well as wishing for a title that is in regular print in large print.

If the material is less than six months old, many libraries will not lend it out. In many cases, we will add the material to our collection request.

*A collection request is a database we keep for any books that you wish for the library to purchase that is newer than six months old. We may or may not purchase the material depending on a vary of reasons.

Many ILL’s will take 7-14 business days to arrive, if you need the material sooner than that, it may be wise to consider another alternative.

 

CHECKING OUT YOUR ILL:

When your loan has arrived, you will receive a notification from your preferred method (normally a phone call).

If you do receive a material from out of state, a charge will be placed on your account with an explanation.

Just like any other item within our collection, you will be responsible to return your item.

Late fees may apply.

 

AM I ABLE TO RENEW?

Occasionally, a library will allow a renewal. If you are in need of a renewal, please contact the Aurora Library or the Dillsboro Library before the date your item is due.

We can give up to a week renewal while waiting for a reply back from the current lending library.

 

RETURNING MY ILL:

Because the materials are owned by other Libraries, it is important to return the materials in a timely manner. The due dates are generally determined by the lending library and can be as long as a month or as short as two weeks. Any fines/fees due to the material being returned late will be determined by the lending library and will be charged to you.

 

If you know exactly what item you would like, you are more than welcome to fill out our form on our website or come in or call either branch to request an ILL today!

 

If you request a DVD, the DVD will not count towards our DVD limit.  This is the same for TV shows, as well.

Example: You request Lady Bird, and we receive the DVD from another library. You can still also check out two other DVD’s from our library.

 

 

9/11 Fiction, Nonfiction, & Movies

To some, it feels like the events of September 11, 2001 happened only moments ago; many of us can still remember exactly where we were and what we were doing when we found out that we had been attacked. But all the younger generation knows about the events is what they’ve been taught in school, or read in books, or watched on movies and documentaries. It is important to keep any historical event relevant, especially one of this magnitude. One of the most popular ways to do so is to offer historical fiction.

With the anniversary of 9/11 fast approaching, here are some fiction, nonfiction, and movie titles for teen and young adult readers to help them have a feel for what it was like to be alive from various walks of life during the September 11 terrorist attacks:

Fiction

Falling Man by Don DeLillo

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid

Tuesday Morning series by Karen Kingsbury

Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann

A Fall of Marigolds by Susan Meissner

All We Have Left by Wendy Mills

Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Zero Day by Mark Russinovich

Nonfiction

9/11 The World Speaks

Let’s Roll by Lisa Beamer

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim DeFede

102 Minutes by Jim Dwyer

Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive by Joel Meyerowitz

Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson

Last Man Down by Richard Picciotto

World Trade Center by Peter Skinner

Report from Ground Zero by Dennis Smith

Movies

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

Man on Wire

Remember Me

United 93

World Trade Center

Here are some other titles you could ask for through Interlibrary Loan:

Nine, Ten by Nora Raleigh Baskin

The Man with the Red Bandana by Richard Lawson

Eleven by David Llewellyn

The Usual Rules by Joyce Maynard

Eleven by Tom Rogers

Portraits: 9/11/01 by The New York Times

Tower Stories by Damon DiMarco

In the Shadow of No Towers by Art Spiegelman

With Their Eyes by Annie Thomas

Tiger Cruise

Do you have any other recommendations?

Stuck Between the Pages

Are you in high school and looking for something to do this summer? Do you love to read and discuss books with people who love to read just as much as you do? Do you like snacks? Join Stuck Between the Pages! Stuck Between the Pages is the high school age book discussion that takes place once a month at the Aurora Public Library. Call or stop by to sign up and pick up your copy of the book today!

The next discussion will take place on Tuesday, June 12 at 6 p.m. at the Aurora Public Library. We’ll be reading The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. There is a copy waiting just for you to check out! We can’t wait to discuss it with you!

Why You Should Join Our New YA Book Club.

 

The Aurora Public Library District wants to encourage you to join out new High School Book Club! Below are some reasons why you should join.

1.Book clubs introduce you to books you wouldn’t normally read.

2. You’ll meet people who enjoy the same books as you.

3. You get to freely give your opinion without being judged for it.

4. It’s Free!

5. Everyone is welcome!

6. You’ll become more confident in yourself.

7. You have a legitimate excuse to read all the time.

8. Every book has the power to change you.

9. It cuts out that dilemma of what book to read next.

10. It gives you a chance to visit your local library once a month!

 

 

 

The registration deadline for May’s meeting is on April 24th! If you are wanting to join or have any questions about joining, call us or come in and ask! Be sure to register and pick up our May Selection: The Night CircusIf you have already read the book, great! You’re still able to join!

 

If you still are questioning about joining this amazing group, follow the links below to be persuaded:

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/5-reasons-to-join-book-club

https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/10-reasons-why-you-should-join-book-club

 

Reading Challenge for 2018

I know it’s crazy to even write the year 2018, but it will soon be upon us! Are you looking for your next reading challenge? Here are some suggestions that might help you get started!

Read a book recommended to you by a librarian. (This is easy because we LOVE to recommend books to you here at the Aurora Public Library District! Or you can always check the blog to see what books we’ve been writing and raving about.)

Read a book that’s been in your “To Be Read” pile for way too long. Or read a book that you own but you haven’t gotten around to reading yet.

Listen to an audiobook. (This is easy for people who love audiobooks, but for those who have a hard time letting go of the words on the page, it can be a real challenge! You can do it!)

Read a book where the main character or the author is different than you; this could be ethnicity, religion, culture, ability, etc. Try to see the world through someone else’s eyes. You could also read a book from a nonhuman perspective.

Read a book written by multiple authors. (See if you can pick out the different writing styles of each author as you go along.)

Read a book written by someone you admire.

Read a classic. Or you could read a book you were supposed to read in school but didn’t. (I won’t tell.) You could even read a children’s book you never got to read when you were small.

Read a book by an author who uses a pseudonym.

Read a bestseller from a genre you wouldn’t usually read.

Read the first book in a series you’ve never read before.

Read a book that was published in 2018 or that is becoming a movie that year.

Read a book that was published the year you were born.

Read a book set in more than one time period.

Read a book based on a true story.

Read a book you love so much, it always makes you smile. This could even be a beloved children’s book.

Read a book that someone close to you loves more than any other book that you’ve never read before.

Read a book set somewhere drastic, like during a war, in the wilderness, or the characters are trying to survive, etc. Read something to get your heart pumping.

Read a book solely based on the cover; literally judge a book by its cover without reading the summary of what it’s about.

Read a book that will make you smarter.

Read a book that everyone but you has read. This could be that book everyone was raving about last year that was made into a movie.

Read a book with an unreliable narrator.

Read a book with pictures! (How fun would this be?!)

Read a book that’s a story within a story.

Red a book that’s won a prestigious award.

I know that our lives are busy and that it can be hard to even find time to sit down, let alone read a book. But even if you cross just a few of these off the list, you’ll come out of the challenge as a better, more well-rounded person than you were last year. But who am I to dictate what you should and shouldn’t read? Create your own reading challenge for 2018 and let us know how you do! I’d love to be inspired by you!

Happy Reading!

Scary Stories for Halloween

It’s the spookiest time of year again! What better way to spend these long fall nights than to be scared senseless (or just a little spooked) than by reading creepy stories to get you in the mood for Halloween?

The Aurora Public Library District has lots of Halloween picture, ABC, and Easy chapter books for your little ones. These books are easy to locate because they are shelved according to their titles rather than by the author’s last name, which is how the rest of fiction is shelved throughout the District. So if you’re looking for books about Halloween, pumpkins, ghosts, bats, witches, etc., start by looking for these books on the shelves by subject. If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, we can search our catalog by subject and pull up more titles for you. Let us help you find that perfect title with just the right amount of scary for your little ones!

For our older elementary age readers, we have plenty of eerie books to get you in the mood for Halloween, like the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series, the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stine, or Darren Shan’s various series. You can check out The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare, Tales for the Midnight Hour: Stories of Horror by J.B. Stamper, The Scary Story Reader, Coraline by Neil Gaiman, The Doll Bones by Holly Black, Thornhill by Pam Smy, and more! We’ll find a story with just the right amount of creepy just for you!

For our teen and young adult readers, there are many chilling series, like the Thirst series by Christopher Pike, The Mediator series by Meg Cabot, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children series by Ransom Riggs and more. There are standalone titles like Wickedpedia by Chris Van Etten, The Omen by David Seltzer,  Teeth: Vampire Tales by Cassandra Clare, or anything by Joe Hill or Jonathan Maberry. You can check out The Walking Dead series in our graphic novels section, too, if you want a visual of the gory details on the page.

There are plenty of horror stories for adults, too, whether you’re looking for classic or contemporary reads. You can check out Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving, Interview With The Vampire by Anne Rice, or The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty. You can also read pretty much anything by Stephen King, John Saul, Heather GrahamPeter Straub, Laurell K. Hamilton, Dean Koontz, or Richard Bachman. Other standalone titles are Obedience by Will Lavender, Where Are The Children by Mary Higgins Clark, and The Scarlet Gospels by Clive Barker.

As always, feel free to peruse the Indiana Digital Download Center for more spooky titles or ask one of us for help.

Happy Reading!

Series Starters: The Selection

If you’re looking for an easy series read with elements of a dystopian, futuristic society with a competition to win the prince’s heart, then The Selection series by Kiera Cass is perfect for you! This series is what I like to call a fluff read, with an easy romance and just enough bad guys in the story to keep the plot moving right along. There are five books total in the series that you will be able to devour one after the other, whether you check them out from the Indiana Digital Download Center or from the Aurora or Dillsboro branches.

Teenager America Singer has gone through her entire life as a Five, which means she is on the lower end of the caste system with little to no prospects of ever moving up into the world. Her  family– and other Fives — work as musicians, entertainers, and artists to make ends meet. The only prospects America, and other girls like her, have of a better life is to enter into The Selection, which is the competition that only comes around when the heir to the crown and dystopian country comes of age. America is coerced into entering the competition by her mother and is shocked to find out that she is chosen to be one of only thirty-five girls, who come from all different backgrounds and castes all over the country, to compete for Prince Maxon’s affections. America now has to leave her boyfriend Aspen, a Six, behind at home while she goes off to the palace to try to make it long enough for her family to survive on the payout without falling in love with the prince or letting him fall for her. As the lowest number in the caste to compete, America quickly makes many enemies, even the king himself.

I enjoyed this series immensely, with all the twists and turns it took and the portrait it drew of a futuristic United States ruled entirely by a king and queen, and mostly separated from the rest of the world. It’s easy to see America’s growth throughout the series as well as empathize with her various internal conflicts. I definitely recommend!

The first three books follow America’s competition and the final two books are the aftermath. You can check out all five of the books as digital copies from the Indiana Digital Download Center, or as physical copies from the Aurora Public Library District branches. You can also check out the novella collection that takes place during the series in these formats.

Happy Reading!

Series Starters: A Court of Thorns and Roses

I’ll admit it; I was leery to start Sarah J. Maas’s other series, A Court of Thorns and Roses. But I’m glad I stuck with it! As always, Maas did not disappoint!

A Court of Thorns and Roses is recommended for young adults and older; in fact, it is often categorized under New Adult, which is a fairly recent subgenre in which characters are between the ages of eighteen and thirty or so. There are strong themes of growing up and coming to terms with oneself, as well as some content that might not be suitable for younger or immature readers.

The series starts with nineteen-year-old Feyre hunting in the woods, trying to keep the promise she made to her mother on her deathbed to always take care of her father and two sisters. She spots a deer but as she’s going in for the kill, a wolf comes along and threatens to steal it away. She takes a chance and kills both the deer and the wolf, thinking her family can keep the meat and she’ll be able to sell the pelts in the village for money. A few days later, it turns out that the wolf was actually a faerie in animal form, and another faerie has come to collect the debt on his sentinel’s life. What Feyre finds is a magical land cursed by a mysterious blight, a beast and his court who cannot take off their masks, and freedom.

After a slow start that seemed nothing more than yet another take on Beauty and the Beast, the action picks up about halfway through and doesn’t stop until the very last page. I’ve found this to be typical of Maas’s books, but it’s definitely worth sticking out. After several twists and turns that you won’t see coming, you won’t be able to wait for the next book in the series. Fortunately, the Aurora Public Library District has the first three novels in the series available for you to check out as physical or digital copies!

Happy Reading!

 

Series Starters: Divergent

For young adults, sometimes it feels like the dystopian genre is overused; sometimes it feels like the apocalyptic/end-of-the-word/new society story has been told over and over again so that it’s hard to see how new stories are still released. However, Veronica Roth’s dystopian trilogy, Divergent, manages to be extremely innovative and will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very last page.

Beatrice Prior lives in “the City,” a dystopian version of Chicago, where the citizens are divided into five virtue-based factions: Candor (honesty), Erudite (intellect), Dauntless (bravery), Abnegation (selflessness), and Amity (peacefulness). Beatrice and her family are Abnegation, so they put others before themselves every minute of every day, which is something Beatrice struggles with. On a special day every year, those who have turned sixteen in the past year are required to choose the faction in which they will spend the rest of their lives after taking several placement tests to help them decide. During the tests, it is determined that Beatrice is Divergent, which means that her personality does not favor one faction over another; instead she tests equally into three factions, which is the most dangerous thing she could be. After making the choice that surprises both her and her parents, she renames herself Tris and struggles to survive the intense initiation of her new faction. As the novel intensifies, it becomes more clear that Tris is in great danger… and so is the rest of her city.

Veronica Roth published Divergent, the first in the trilogy, in 2011 when she was only twenty-three years old, which makes me extremely jealous. A prequel of short stories to the series, Four: A Divergent Collection, was released in 2014, a year after the third installment. Her newest standalone novel, Carve the Mark, was released earlier this year. The Divergent series has been made into three movies so far, with a fourth movie on the horizon.

I loved this series. I listened to the audiobooks when I was driving back and forth to work, but I am planning on rereading them once I get through the mountain of other books I want to read. And while many fans were critical about how the series ended, I thought that it couldn’t have ended any other way. I can’t give anything else away because of, you know, spoilers, but there is some respect for an author like Roth. I would definitely recommend this series.

The Aurora Public Library District owns physical copies of each movie and book, as well as digital copies of the books on the Indiana Digital Download Center.

Happy Reading!

Series Starters: Throne of Glass

The Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas has been on my to-read list for a year now, but I had been putting it off because I was skeptical. I thought it would be another typical YA series with yet another heroine destined to save the world, overthrow the government, and fall in love all at the same time. And while these elements are the bare bones of the plot, I was not prepared for the whirlwind that was the first book in this series.

Celaena Sardothien is the world’s most notorious assassin — or, at least, she was until she was captured and imprisoned as a slave a year ago. An unlikely offer from Crown Prince Dorian Havilliard pulls her out of the depths of slavery and launches her into a competition to become the King’s Champion, where she must defeat twenty-three other infamous assassins, thieves, and soldiers to regain her freedom. However, what Celaena thought would be a run-of-the mill test of her wits and strength quickly becomes something more sinister. Evil is lurking in the castle and something is killing off the competitors one by one. Now it’s up to Celaena to find whatever monster it is that is killing her competition, survive a tyrannical king who has brutally conquered most of the countries on the continent, allow her new acquaintances close enough to be friends, and become the King’s Champion so she can be free again.

This is a slower read to get into as Maas draws readers to her characters first, allowing the action to pick up during the second half of the novel. I was invested in Celaena almost from the start because Maas does such a great job of closing her off from everyone around her, even the reader; I was as frustrated as Dorian and Chaol when she shuts down and refuses to talk about her past! There are still unanswered questions at the end of the novel, so it’s a good thing that there are four other books following the first as well, as well as the sixth and seventh books being published in September 2017 and May 2018, respectively.

The Aurora Public Library District has the five existing novels available from the Indiana Digital Download Center as well as a couple hard copies of some of the books available for check out today. Also available from the Indiana Digital Download Center are prequel novellas from the Throne of Glass universe that can be checked out as well.

It looks like I’ll be absorbed in this series for awhile, but I don’t think I mind. I’ll just be over here, impatiently awaiting the release of the final two novels!

Happy Reading!