A Not-So-Merry GRINCHmas!!

There’s a new movie release of The Grinch this month, but I can’t help it if I still love the original version, How the Grinch Stole Christmas. This 1966 animated TV film was the first adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ book of the same name, and starred Boris Karloff as both the narrator and the wonderfully wicked voice of the Grinch.

The Grinch has certainly become an icon of Christmas since the book was released in 1957, despite the character’s hatred of the season. We know that the Grinch, annoyed by the noisy Christmas festivities that take place in Whoville, decides to devise a wicked scheme to steal the Who’s presents, trees, and food for their Christmas feast. When the Grinch hears the residents of Whoville singing a joyous song, rather than lamenting over the loss of their Christmas goodies, he realizes that “maybe Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”

Who can resist watching the original version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas just one more time, enjoying Grinch treats, playing games and making a Grinch ornament to take home? Tweens and Teens (ages 11-18) are invited to spend an evening at the Aurora Branch Library, on Thursday, December 13, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, for A Not-So-Merry GRINCHmas, to celebrate all things Grinch-y.

Register now by calling 812-926-0646 to save your spot in Aurora Branch Library’s own Whoville.

Want or Need a Book We Don’t Have?

Both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library have hundreds of books combined. Though our collection is quite extensive and filled with every kind of book, there’s no possible way to have every single book in the world ever published. So thankfully we have a service called Inter-library loan.

Our ILL service gives our members access to a much wider range of materials than normally possible.

 

WHO CAN USE OUR ILL SERVICE?

Any patron in good standing who has a membership that includes borrowing privileges.

 

WHAT CAN BE BORROWED?

Books, audio-books, movies, seasons, etc.

 

WHAT’S THE COST?

If we can get the item from within our state, there isn’t a charge!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occasionally, we won’t be able to find an item and in this case any item received from out of state will carry a postage charge that depends on the material’s size and its weight. You are able to specify whether you’d like to avoid charges at the time of your request.

 

BEFORE PLACING A REQUEST:

If the desired material is part of our Library’s current collection, we will not borrow it from another library.

However, if we have a title in Large Print and you would like it to be in regular print, we are able to borrow the title that way. As well as wishing for a title that is in regular print in large print.

If the material is less than six months old, many libraries will not lend it out. In many cases, we will add the material to our collection request.

*A collection request is a database we keep for any books that you wish for the library to purchase that is newer than six months old. We may or may not purchase the material depending on a vary of reasons.

Many ILL’s will take 7-14 business days to arrive, if you need the material sooner than that, it may be wise to consider another alternative.

 

CHECKING OUT YOUR ILL:

When your loan has arrived, you will receive a notification from your preferred method (normally a phone call).

If you do receive a material from out of state, a charge will be placed on your account with an explanation.

Just like any other item within our collection, you will be responsible to return your item.

Late fees may apply.

 

AM I ABLE TO RENEW?

Occasionally, a library will allow a renewal. If you are in need of a renewal, please contact the Aurora Library or the Dillsboro Library before the date your item is due.

We can give up to a week renewal while waiting for a reply back from the current lending library.

 

RETURNING MY ILL:

Because the materials are owned by other Libraries, it is important to return the materials in a timely manner. The due dates are generally determined by the lending library and can be as long as a month or as short as two weeks. Any fines/fees due to the material being returned late will be determined by the lending library and will be charged to you.

 

If you know exactly what item you would like, you are more than welcome to fill out our form on our website or come in or call either branch to request an ILL today!

 

If you request a DVD, the DVD will not count towards our DVD limit.  This is the same for TV shows, as well.

Example: You request Lady Bird, and we receive the DVD from another library. You can still also check out two other DVD’s from our library.

 

 

Libraries Rock! with Teen Musical Trivia Night and Inspirational Lyric Painting

Libraries Rock! with Teen Musical Trivia Night and Inspirational Lyric Painting

Are you a teen? Can you recite all the lyrics to your favorite musicals?

Then come out to the Dillsboro Public Library on July 17th from 4:00 – 6:00 PM or

the Aurora Public Library on July 19th from 6:00 – 8:00 PM and test that musical knowledge!

A first place prize will be awarded!

Musicals not your thing? Then stick around for snacks and fun inspirational lyric painting on canvas!


Why You Should Join Our New YA Book Club.

 

The Aurora Public Library District wants to encourage you to join out new High School Book Club! Below are some reasons why you should join.

1.Book clubs introduce you to books you wouldn’t normally read.

2. You’ll meet people who enjoy the same books as you.

3. You get to freely give your opinion without being judged for it.

4. It’s Free!

5. Everyone is welcome!

6. You’ll become more confident in yourself.

7. You have a legitimate excuse to read all the time.

8. Every book has the power to change you.

9. It cuts out that dilemma of what book to read next.

10. It gives you a chance to visit your local library once a month!

 

 

 

The registration deadline for May’s meeting is on April 24th! If you are wanting to join or have any questions about joining, call us or come in and ask! Be sure to register and pick up our May Selection: The Night CircusIf you have already read the book, great! You’re still able to join!

 

If you still are questioning about joining this amazing group, follow the links below to be persuaded:

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/5-reasons-to-join-book-club

https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/10-reasons-why-you-should-join-book-club

 

Looking at Race in Teen Books

There is probably no more polarizing issue today than that of race. Teens are right in the middle of this issue as they engage with different forms of media and they interact with their family and their peers. This topic is also getting more attention in the world of Young Adult Literature. The teenage years are when young adults struggle to make sense of the events taking place around them and also to construct their own world view based on the various viewpoints they hear. Books can help with that process by offering different perspectives!

How It Went Down and All American Boys both point to the difficulty of understanding an event due to the varying viewpoints of the observers. All American Boys is also on this year’s Eliot Rosewater book list for high school students.

How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon   All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

The following two books address conflicts that arise when an African American teen attends a mostly white prep school. The Hate U Give is one of the most highly praised Young Adult novels to be published in 2017.

The Hate U Give by Angie ThomasBlack Boy, White School by Brian Walker

The last four books are classified as historical fiction, but range in time period from the 1960s back to the 1920s.

X by Ilyasah Shabazz   Call Me By My Name by John Ed Bradley

Out of Darknes by Ashley Hope Perez   Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

Race is a complicated issue and reading from different perspectives can be enormously helpful for us all! Why not check out a copy to read with your teens? I’m sure that each of these books will provide lots of thought-provoking discussion.

As always, if you’d like more suggestions, just ask!

 

 

 

Short Story Collections for Teens

Do you ever feel like you don’t have the time or desire to plunge into a hefty novel? Try reaching for a short story collection instead. We have a growing number of short story collections available in the Teen area of our libraries. You can also check on the Indiana Digital Download Center (IDDC) to find many of these titles available as an e-book. Just go to the Digital Downloads link on our web page.

Some of these story collections are used by the authors to fill in gaps between books in a series or to tell a story from a different character’s perspective.

The Bane Chronicles  Delirium Stories by Lauren Oliver  Blue Bloods: Keys to the Repository by Melissa de la Cruz

Tales of the Peculiar by Ransom Riggs was written after the completion of the Miss Peregrine’s Home series and is written as the fantastical book which plays such an important role in the series.

Tales of the Peculiar by Ransom Riggs

Others of these anthologies are created around a common theme such as steampunk, dystopian literature, or paranormal tales.

Steampunk: an Anthology of Fantastically Rich and Strange Stories  Shards & Ashes  The Curiosities: A Collection of Stories

Titles like Black Juice by Margo Lanagan feature stories all written by one author. Other titles may include stories by multiple authors and are a great way to find a new favorite writer. Zombies vs. Unicorns includes stories by Garth Nix, Maureen Johnson, Cassandra Clare and others.

Black Juice by Margo Lanagan  Zombies vs. Unicorns

We even have 2 collections of holiday stories for teens!

Let It Snow: 3 Holiday Romances  My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories

Give a short story collection a try, and let us know which books you enjoy!

We Were Liars

E. Lockhart captured me from the very first sentence to the very last sentence. She enthralled me and refused to allow me to place the book down. I don’t know what grabbed me, whether it was the similes or the metaphors or Cadence and Gat, or perhaps it was Cadence herself. It was a beautiful story with beautiful characters and a beautiful ending.

Her writing made me love her as well as made me hate her. It made me cry and it made me laugh.

“A beautiful and distinguished family. A private island. A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy. A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive. A revolution. An accident. A secret. Lies upon lies. True love. The truth.” This summary of the book on Goodreads doesn’t do the book any justice.

The story focuses on “The Liars”, and is told from Cadence’s point of view. She speaks of Mirren and Johnny, Gat and herself. She tells her story and how she remembers and how she overcomes the accident. It speaks of young love and it tells us of regret and rebellion.

Reviews:


“Haunting, sophisticated . . . a novel so twisty and well-told that it will appeal to older readers as well as to adolescents
.” —Wall Street Journal

“A rich, stunning summer mystery with a sharp twist that will leave you dying to talk about the book with a pal or ten.” —Parade.com

“Thrilling, beautiful, and blisteringly smart, We Were Liars is utterly unforgettable.” —John Green, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars

“You’re going to want to remember the title. Liars details the summers of a girl who harbors a dark secret, and delivers a satisfying, but shocking twist ending.” —Breia Brissey, Entertainment Weekly

 

E. Lockhart tells such a brilliant and tragic story with less than 300 words.

 

Located:

We Were Liars is available at both Dillsboro and Aurora as well as our digital library.

 

Hope you enjoy this book as much as I did!

 

LGBTQ+ Community Within Our Shelves

It’s a thing of controversy in today’s world. The LGBTQ+ community is a strong and withstanding part of our society. Authors are taking it upon themselves to intertwine this community within their own lives by writing their own stories with this community included. It’s a big jump in society for books to include this community and what they represent. Some authors get hate and some authors get love.

The point most authors see as they write their LGBTQ+ stories is to empower their readers to accept themselves for who they are and even to empower them not to be afraid to ‘come out of the closet.’

The Aurora Public Library has several fantastic LGBTQ+ stories within their shelves, one amazing book that I’ve recently read was ‘Of Fire and Stars’, by Audrey Coulthurst.

“Of Fire and Stars” is an enchanting story of a princess with a touch of fire and another princess who has a unique relationship with horses. Princess Dennaleia has been betrothed to Prince Thandi since childhood. As she arrives at his kingdom, she meets his sister, Princess Amaranthine. Princess Amaranthine isn’t your typical Princess who does princess-y things. She prefers to be called ‘Mare’, she walks around in breeches, is outspoken, and prefers to work with horses than to work with people. Princess Dennaleia is drawn to Mare, wanting…no, needing to make an ally in a different kingdom away from her family. While struggling with trying to make Mare like her, Princess Dennaleia also struggles with controlling her affinity for fire. After all, magic is outlawed in this kingdom. With turmoil threatening and mysterious deaths, Princess Dennaleia and Mare must find out who’s behind it all and not let their kingdoms’ alliance be threatened anymore than it already has. In doing so, they must fight with the feelings that are growing between them. Will they choose duty or will they choose their hearts?

 

 

 

Just a few great LGBTQ+ stories our shelves house….

 

 

Hate List

Jennifer Brown filled every single page of this 405 page novel with such a beautiful story. Never before have I read a story that made me think differently about certain people and those who loved them. Hate List is a wonderful story and in today’s world, it fits perfectly within.

Hate List tells us the story of Valerie Leftman’s recovery after her boyfriend of three years, Nick Levil, shot and killed several people in their high school, including her and himself. The beginning of the story introduces us to Valerie and her first day back to her school after the shooting occurred. It shows us her pain and confusion that Nick killed himself and others. We watch as she struggles between hating Nick and forgiving him as well as herself. This book gives us some type of inside pain to those who loved the people we call, ‘monsters’, in today’s world. Though we don’t know why the character Nick did what he did, we do know that Valerie continued to struggle with his decision and the all the pain he caused afterward.

This story captivated me and tore my heart out with every word and punctuation mark. It made my heart ache for every character within, including Nick. The sadness the author included within these pages just enveloped me and hugged me until the hope finally won over.

Fall in Love all Over Again

If you’ve ever been in love, then you know that you get flutters in your stomach, your heart beats faster when they’re near, you can’t get them out of your mind. Why not fall in love all over again with a good book?

 

 

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orphaned, penniless, Jacob Jankowski jumps a freight train in the dark, and in that instant, transforms his future.

By morning, he’s landed a job with the Flying Squadron of the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth. By nightfall, he’s in love.

In an America made colorless by prohibition and the Depression, the circus is a refuge of sequins and sensuality. But behind the glamour lies a darker world, where both animals and men are dispensable. Where falling in love is the most dangerous act of all…

 

 

 

This epic tale about the effects of the Russian Revolution and its aftermath on a bourgeois family was not published in the Soviet Union until 1987. One of the results of its publication in the West was Pasternak’s complete rejection by Soviet authorities; when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1958 he was compelled to decline it. The book quickly became an international best-seller.

Dr. Yury Zhivago, Pasternak’s alter ego, is a poet, philosopher, and physician whose life is disrupted by the war and by his love for Lara, the wife of a revolutionary. His artistic nature makes him vulnerable to the brutality and harshness of the Bolsheviks. The poems he writes constitute some of the most beautiful writing in the novel

 

 

 

 

 

Gone with the Wind is a novel written by Margaret Mitchell, first published in 1936. The story is set in Clayton County, Georgia, and Atlanta during the American Civil War and Reconstruction era. It depicts the struggles of young Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled daughter of a well-to-do plantation owner, who must use every means at her disposal to claw her way out of the poverty she finds herself in after Sherman’s March to the Sea. A historical novel, the story is a Bildungsroman or coming-of-age story, with the title taken from a poem written by Ernest Dowson.

Gone with the Wind was popular with American readers from the onset and was the top American fiction bestseller in the year it was published and in 1937. As of 2014, a Harris poll found it to be the second favorite book of American readers, just behind the Bible. More than 30 million copies have been printed worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has barely been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex–Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel—and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is.

Will is acerbic, moody, bossy—but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

 

 

 

 

 

Set amid the austere beauty of the North Carolina coast, The Notebook begins with the story of Noah Calhoun, a rural Southerner recently returned from the Second World War. Noah is restoring a plantation home to its former glory, and he is haunted by images of the beautiful girl he met fourteen years earlier, a girl he loved like no other. Unable to find her, yet unwilling to forget the summer they spent together, Noah is content to live with only memories…until she unexpectedly returns to his town to see him once again.

Like a puzzle within a puzzle, the story of Noah and Allie is just the beginning. As it unfolds, their tale miraculously becomes something different, with much higher stakes. The result is a deeply moving portrait of love itself, the tender moments and the fundamental changes that affect us all. It is a story of miracles and emotions that will stay with you forever.

 

 

 

Audrey Niffenegger’s dazzling debut is the story of Clare, a beautiful, strong-minded art student, and Henry, an adventuresome librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were married when Clare was twenty-three and Henry thirty-one. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: his genetic clock randomly resets and he finds himself misplaced in time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity from his life, past and future. His disappearances are spontaneous and unpredictable, and lend a spectacular urgency to Clare and Henry’s unconventional love story. That their attempt to live normal lives together is threatened by something they can neither prevent nor control makes their story intensely moving and entirely unforgettable.

 

 

 

 

As a little girl, Jane has no one. Her mother Vivienne Margaux, the powerful head of a major New York theater company has no time for her. But she does have one friend–Michael–and no one can see him but her. But Michael can’t stay with Jane forever, and on her ninth birthday, her imaginary friend must leave her.

When Jane is in her thirties, working for her mother’s company, she is just as alone as she was as a child. Her boyfriend hardly knows she’s there and is more interested in what Vivienne can do for his career. Her mother practically treats her as a slave in the office, despite the great success of Jane’s first play, “Thank Heaven.” Then she finds Michael–handsome, and just the same as she remembers him, only now he’s not imaginary. For once in her life, Jane is happy–and has someone who loves her back. But not even Michael knows the reason behind why they’ve really been reunited.

 

 

 

It’s 1988 and Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley have only just met on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways. But after only one day together, they cannot stop thinking about one another.
Over twenty years, snapshots of that relationship are revealed on the same day—July 15th—of each year. Dex and Em face squabbles and fights, hopes and missed opportunities, laughter and tears. And as the true meaning of this one crucial day is revealed, they must come to grips with the nature of love and life itself.

Twenty years, two people, one day.

 

 

 

 

Every April, when the wind blows from the sea and mingles with the scent of lilacs, Landon Carter remembers his last year at Beaufort High. It was 1958, and Landon had already dated a girl or two. He even swore that he had once been in love. Certainly the last person in town he thought he’d fall for was Jamie Sullivan, the daughter of the town’s Baptist minister.

A quiet girl who always carried a Bible with her schoolbooks, Jamie seemed content living in a world apart from the other teens. She took care of her widowed father, rescued hurt animals, and helped out at the local orphanage. No boy had ever asked her out. Landon would never have dreamed of it.


Then a twist of fate made Jamie his partner for the homecoming dance, and Landon Carter’s life would never be the same. Being with Jamie would show him the depths of the human heart and lead him to a decision so stunning it would send him irrevocably on the road to manhood…

 

 

 

 

Ian McEwan’s symphonic novel of love and war, childhood and class, guilt and forgiveness provides all the satisfaction of a brilliant narrative and the provocation we have come to expect from this master of English prose.

On a hot summer day in 1934, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives—together with her precocious literary gifts—brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.