Libraries Rock! Teen Paint Party

Are you a teenager who loves to create? This is the perfect program for you! Join us at the Aurora Public Library on Thursday, July 12 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. for a Teen Paint Party! Come out and paint a ceramic tile with alcohol inks to take, presented by Chris Campbell. Registration is required, however, and is limited to sixteen teenagers, so make sure to stop by or call the Library to register! No special talent is required! We hope to see you there!

Stuck Between the Pages

Are you in high school and looking for something to do this summer? Do you love to read and discuss books with people who love to read just as much as you do? Do you like snacks? Join Stuck Between the Pages! Stuck Between the Pages is the high school age book discussion that takes place once a month at the Aurora Public Library. Call or stop by to sign up and pick up your copy of the book today!

The next discussion will take place on Tuesday, June 12 at 6 p.m. at the Aurora Public Library. We’ll be reading The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. There is a copy waiting just for you to check out! We can’t wait to discuss it with you!

Reading Challenge for 2018

I know it’s crazy to even write the year 2018, but it will soon be upon us! Are you looking for your next reading challenge? Here are some suggestions that might help you get started!

Read a book recommended to you by a librarian. (This is easy because we LOVE to recommend books to you here at the Aurora Public Library District! Or you can always check the blog to see what books we’ve been writing and raving about.)

Read a book that’s been in your “To Be Read” pile for way too long. Or read a book that you own but you haven’t gotten around to reading yet.

Listen to an audiobook. (This is easy for people who love audiobooks, but for those who have a hard time letting go of the words on the page, it can be a real challenge! You can do it!)

Read a book where the main character or the author is different than you; this could be ethnicity, religion, culture, ability, etc. Try to see the world through someone else’s eyes. You could also read a book from a nonhuman perspective.

Read a book written by multiple authors. (See if you can pick out the different writing styles of each author as you go along.)

Read a book written by someone you admire.

Read a classic. Or you could read a book you were supposed to read in school but didn’t. (I won’t tell.) You could even read a children’s book you never got to read when you were small.

Read a book by an author who uses a pseudonym.

Read a bestseller from a genre you wouldn’t usually read.

Read the first book in a series you’ve never read before.

Read a book that was published in 2018 or that is becoming a movie that year.

Read a book that was published the year you were born.

Read a book set in more than one time period.

Read a book based on a true story.

Read a book you love so much, it always makes you smile. This could even be a beloved children’s book.

Read a book that someone close to you loves more than any other book that you’ve never read before.

Read a book set somewhere drastic, like during a war, in the wilderness, or the characters are trying to survive, etc. Read something to get your heart pumping.

Read a book solely based on the cover; literally judge a book by its cover without reading the summary of what it’s about.

Read a book that will make you smarter.

Read a book that everyone but you has read. This could be that book everyone was raving about last year that was made into a movie.

Read a book with an unreliable narrator.

Read a book with pictures! (How fun would this be?!)

Read a book that’s a story within a story.

Red a book that’s won a prestigious award.

I know that our lives are busy and that it can be hard to even find time to sit down, let alone read a book. But even if you cross just a few of these off the list, you’ll come out of the challenge as a better, more well-rounded person than you were last year. But who am I to dictate what you should and shouldn’t read? Create your own reading challenge for 2018 and let us know how you do! I’d love to be inspired by you!

Happy Reading!

Scary Stories for Halloween

It’s the spookiest time of year again! What better way to spend these long fall nights than to be scared senseless (or just a little spooked) than by reading creepy stories to get you in the mood for Halloween?

The Aurora Public Library District has lots of Halloween picture, ABC, and Easy chapter books for your little ones. These books are easy to locate because they are shelved according to their titles rather than by the author’s last name, which is how the rest of fiction is shelved throughout the District. So if you’re looking for books about Halloween, pumpkins, ghosts, bats, witches, etc., start by looking for these books on the shelves by subject. If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, we can search our catalog by subject and pull up more titles for you. Let us help you find that perfect title with just the right amount of scary for your little ones!

For our older elementary age readers, we have plenty of eerie books to get you in the mood for Halloween, like the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series, the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stine, or Darren Shan’s various series. You can check out The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare, Tales for the Midnight Hour: Stories of Horror by J.B. Stamper, The Scary Story Reader, Coraline by Neil Gaiman, The Doll Bones by Holly Black, Thornhill by Pam Smy, and more! We’ll find a story with just the right amount of creepy just for you!

For our teen and young adult readers, there are many chilling series, like the Thirst series by Christopher Pike, The Mediator series by Meg Cabot, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children series by Ransom Riggs and more. There are standalone titles like Wickedpedia by Chris Van Etten, The Omen by David Seltzer,  Teeth: Vampire Tales by Cassandra Clare, or anything by Joe Hill or Jonathan Maberry. You can check out The Walking Dead series in our graphic novels section, too, if you want a visual of the gory details on the page.

There are plenty of horror stories for adults, too, whether you’re looking for classic or contemporary reads. You can check out Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving, Interview With The Vampire by Anne Rice, or The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty. You can also read pretty much anything by Stephen King, John Saul, Heather GrahamPeter Straub, Laurell K. Hamilton, Dean Koontz, or Richard Bachman. Other standalone titles are Obedience by Will Lavender, Where Are The Children by Mary Higgins Clark, and The Scarlet Gospels by Clive Barker.

As always, feel free to peruse the Indiana Digital Download Center for more spooky titles or ask one of us for help.

Happy Reading!

Memoirs for Teens & Young Adults

Teens and Young Adults (Millennials) are constantly being chastised for checking out of reality by being on their phones, but sometimes Milennials are being caught up in great stories posted on Twitter or Instagram, stories that give us hope that humanity still exists out there in this world. If you enjoy reading about the human existence, then you’ll love this blog post; the Aurora Public Library District has dozens of memoirs for teens and young adults that will speak to their own experiences in life.

There are plenty of classic memoirs that you’ve undoubtedly had to read for school at one time or another, but what would your reading experience be like the second time around, when you aren’t forced to read in order to take a test or write a paper? Here are some classic memoirs you can check out today:

Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

A Child Called “It” by David Pelzer

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells

Night by Elie Wiesel

We also have memoirs from contemporary people who are probably more familiar to you. You would probably enjoy reading these memoirs for the entertainment they will provide:

Nevertheless by Alec Baldwin

Unfiltered:No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me. by Lily Collins

Talking as Fast as I Can: From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls and Everything in Between by Lauren Graham

I Got This: To Gold and Beyond by Laurie Hernandez

Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

I Don’t Belong to You: Quiet the Noise and Find Your Voice by Keke Palmer

The Maddie Diaries by Maddie Ziegler

Of course, we have plenty of empowering memoirs by individuals whose experiences can teach us as well as touch us:

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Let Me Stand Alone: The Journals of Rachel Corrie by Rachel Corrie

A Stolen Life and Freedom: My Book of Firsts by Jaycee Dugard

Soul Surfer by Bethany Hamilton

The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida

Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings

Positive: Surviving my Bullies, Finding Hope, and Changing the World by Paige Rawl

Three Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai

It might come as a surprise to you that we have memoirs in the form of graphic novels, too:

March by John Lewis

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

Smile and Sisters by Raina Telgemeier

And, of course, we can’t forget the memoirs on the Indiana Digital Download Center:

I Will Always Write Back by Caitlin Alifirenka and Martin Ganda

Courage to Soar: A Body in Motion, A Life in Balance by Simone Biles

This Book is Gay by Jame Dawson

Grace, Gold, and Glory: My Leap of Faith by Gabrielle Douglas

This Star Won’t Go Out by Esther Earl

The Amazing Book is Not on Fire by Dan Howell and Phil Lester

Red Scarf Girl by Ji-Li Jiang

Unslut by Emily Lindin

Have you read any great memoirs lately? What are some of your favorites? I recently read Scrappy Little Nobody, Talking as Fast as I Can, and The Maddie Diaries. I would definitely recommend!

Happy Reading!