Want or Need a Book We Don’t Have?

Both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library have hundreds of books combined. Though our collection is quite extensive and filled with every kind of book, there’s no possible way to have every single book in the world ever published. So thankfully we have a service called Inter-library loan.

Our ILL service gives our members access to a much wider range of materials than normally possible.

 

WHO CAN USE OUR ILL SERVICE?

Any patron in good standing who has a membership that includes borrowing privileges.

 

WHAT CAN BE BORROWED?

Books, audio-books, movies, seasons, etc.

 

WHAT’S THE COST?

If we can get the item from within our state, there isn’t a charge!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occasionally, we won’t be able to find an item and in this case any item received from out of state will carry a postage charge that depends on the material’s size and its weight. You are able to specify whether you’d like to avoid charges at the time of your request.

 

BEFORE PLACING A REQUEST:

If the desired material is part of our Library’s current collection, we will not borrow it from another library.

However, if we have a title in Large Print and you would like it to be in regular print, we are able to borrow the title that way. As well as wishing for a title that is in regular print in large print.

If the material is less than six months old, many libraries will not lend it out. In many cases, we will add the material to our collection request.

*A collection request is a database we keep for any books that you wish for the library to purchase that is newer than six months old. We may or may not purchase the material depending on a vary of reasons.

Many ILL’s will take 7-14 business days to arrive, if you need the material sooner than that, it may be wise to consider another alternative.

 

CHECKING OUT YOUR ILL:

When your loan has arrived, you will receive a notification from your preferred method (normally a phone call).

If you do receive a material from out of state, a charge will be placed on your account with an explanation.

Just like any other item within our collection, you will be responsible to return your item.

Late fees may apply.

 

AM I ABLE TO RENEW?

Occasionally, a library will allow a renewal. If you are in need of a renewal, please contact the Aurora Library or the Dillsboro Library before the date your item is due.

We can give up to a week renewal while waiting for a reply back from the current lending library.

 

RETURNING MY ILL:

Because the materials are owned by other Libraries, it is important to return the materials in a timely manner. The due dates are generally determined by the lending library and can be as long as a month or as short as two weeks. Any fines/fees due to the material being returned late will be determined by the lending library and will be charged to you.

 

If you know exactly what item you would like, you are more than welcome to fill out our form on our website or come in or call either branch to request an ILL today!

 

If you request a DVD, the DVD will not count towards our DVD limit.  This is the same for TV shows, as well.

Example: You request Lady Bird, and we receive the DVD from another library. You can still also check out two other DVD’s from our library.

 

 

National Great Poetry Reading Day

Saturday, April 28 is National Great Poetry Reading Day!

How can you celebrate?

For starters, you can visit one of the branches of the Aurora Public Library District and check out volumes of poetry by great poets, like John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Rupi Kaur, William Wordsworth, Sylvia Plath, Alfred Tennyson, Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Frost, Shel Silverstein, and Maya Angelou, among many others. If you just want to browse the poetry section to see what you can find, start in section 808.1. You’ll be able to browse titles at your leisure and take ones that speak to you. Or, if you’d rather, you can visit the Indiana Digital Download Center and browse our digital poetry selections, too.

One major way that poetry differs from novels or nonfiction is that poetry begs to be read out loud. The only way to appreciate the cadence of the words on the page is to read them out loud and listen. On National Great Poetry Reading Day, gather some friends and family around and read your favorite poems aloud. Or record yourself reading your favorite poem and upload it to social media with #NationalGreatPoetryReadingDay. By following the hashtag, you’ll be able to see other poetry connoisseurs celebrating the day in their own way as well.

You could try your hand at writing your own poetry, too! If you want to follow the exact rules to write specific types of poetry, like haiku, sonnet, or limerick, we have titles with examples and instructions. But one of the best things about poetry is that, as you’re writing, you can decide how you want your idea to appear on the paper. Free verse is exactly that; free! You can choose to write your poem however you want.

Tell us how you’re going to celebrate National Great Poetry Reading Day! I’m going to see if I can find my old stuff from college from that poetry class I took.

Happy Reading!

Shakespeare Day!

To celebrate, or not to celebrate? That is the question, but the answer is: Of course! April 23 is National Shakespeare Day!

Baptized on April 26, 1564, William Shakespeare is widely considered to be the greatest writer of the English language, having works ranging from plays to poems, as well as being an actor himself. He was born in raised in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. Not much is known about his early life except at the age of eighteen, he married the much-older Anne Hathaway and had three children with her. He traveled to London sometime between 1585 and 1592 and became a successful writer, actor, and part-owner of a playing company, Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later the King’s Men. He retired to Stratford around 1613, around the age of 49, where he died three years later.

Little else is known about Shakespeare, except that he wrote and produced 37 plays during his time in London, ranging from comedies, including Twelfth Night, As You Like It, and A Midsummer’s Night Dream, to historical dramas, like Richard III, Henry IV, V, and VI, to tragedies, such as Hamlet, Macbeth, and Titus Andronicus. He also wrote 154 sonnets as well as narrative poetry. Shakespeare set the bar that many other writers would follow, influencing generations of writers still today. If you’re interested in learning more about William Shakespeare, follow this link to books in our collection about his life.

So, how can the Aurora Public Library District help you celebrate National Shakespeare Day? Well, you can check out DVDs based on his plays and life, as well as modern retellings of his classic plays. I think it is important to read Shakespeare, but I think it is even more important to watch Shakespeare to really understand him. There is nothing quite like watching words on the page come to life before your eyes, in period costumes with facial expressions and vocal intonations to help you to really grasp the play.

You can also check out copies of his plays and poems to read for yourself, if you’d like to let the words wash over you and give yourself time to process what takes place in each scene, or what each poem is really trying to say. There are physical copies as well as digital copies through the Indiana Digital Download Center. The Aurora Public Library District has a collection of No Fear Shakespeare titles, which puts the original text side-by-side with modern-day language in order to make it easier to understand. This will definitely come in handy if you want more depth to the play.

I am continually amazed at how relevant the themes of the plays are to today, even though Shakespeare’s time was almost 500 years ago. The language might seem archaic, but if you dig deeper until you find the meaning behind the prose, you’ll be surprised, too. Shakespeare was a genius at capturing humans, from their words to the words they weren’t speaking, but that their body language, facial expressions, and tones would show. If you ever get the chance to see one of Shakespeare’s plays in person, I highly recommend that you take it.

How will you celebrate National Shakespeare Day? I think I’ll reread my favorite play, Hamlet, and then watch The Lion King, which is what the Disney movie is based off of. Pretty cool, huh?

Happy Reading!

Who doesn’t love dinosaurs?

Kids of all ages (and adults) are fascinated with dinosaurs! That’s why I was so excited to see a new book of children’s poetry by David Elliott. In the Past is a large format picture book with a short dinosaur poem on each double-page spread; it’s perfect for sharing in one sitting or for reading in small bits.

In the Past by David Elliott

This latest book by Elliott only takes a slight turn from his previous books of poetry featuring animals in different habitats. Those of you who have attended our children’s programs in the past know that I love to share poems. It’s more than just a personal preference; there is firm research that shows poetry is a great way for kids to develop early literacy skills. Poems provide great examples of rhyme, rhythm and figurative language and also encourage us to look at the world around us in creative ways.

In the Sea by David Elliott    In the Wild by David Elliott

Pick up a David Elliott book to share with your family this April for National Poetry Month. For older readers, you might want to try Elliott’s book Bull, a novel written in verse that explores the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. You can find Bull in the teen area at the Aurora Public Library or on OverDrive.

On the Farm by David Elliott   Bull by David Elliott

Young People’s Poet Laureate

What is a Poet Laureate? Did you know we have 2 in the United States? Poet Laureates are designated by nations or groups and are frequently expected to compose poems for special occasions. The Librarian of the United States Congress designates a poet annually to work toward increasing our nation’s appreciation of poetry. This position is currently filled by Tracy K. Smith.

The Poetry Foundation, since 2006, has selected a Young People’s (or Children’s) Poet Laureate for two-year terms. The chosen poet works on a variety of projects to help instill a lifelong love of poetry among the nation’s developing readers.

Margarita Engle has held this position since 2017. Previously this position was filled by Jack Prelutsky, Mary Ann Hoberman, J.Patrick Lewis, Kenn Nesbitt, and Jacqueline Woodson.

I love this excerpt from her poem “Tula”, found in the book The Lightning Dreamer.

Books are door-shaped 

portals

carrying me

across oceans

and centuries,

helping me feel

less alone.

Engle may be best known for her novels in verse, especially those focusing on different aspects of Cuban history. If that doesn’t grab your attention, I will tell you that you need to give these books a try! Engle has a true gift for highlighting episodes in history that are not well-known.

The Firefly Letters by Margarita Engle   The Lightning Dreamer by Margarita Engle

The Poet Slave of Cuba by Margarita Engle   The Surrender Tree by Margarita Engle

We also have some books for younger kids that feature poems by Engle.

Orangutanka by Margarita Engle  Drum Dream Girl by Margarita Engle

Bravo: Poems About Amazing Hispanics by Margarita Engle

I am very excited about Bravo: Poems About Amazing Hispanics, our newest addition by Engle. This book is located in our juvenile biography area and is perfect for families and classrooms!

Diversity is a huge focus in children’s literature and there was so much in this book that was new to me!

You can read more of Engle’s poetry on the Poetry Foundation’s web page.

Take the Poetry Challenge!

As National Poetry Month comes to a close, I have a challenge for you. Try to read at least one poem. Some of you will claim to not like poetry, to not understand it, to not know what to choose. These excuses may be true, but it can be fun to stretch yourself a bit. I have some great suggestions to help you get started. Poetry can be very personal. It may bring out strong emotions – including laughter and joy. My suggestions are just suggestions; you may have to pull some books off the shelves before you find one you will enjoy.

If you’re still with me, you may have decided to give it a try. Ask yourself if you want to try something traditional or more modern? Do you want a narrative poem or a shorter work that just evokes a scene or a moment? You may want to take a large collection of poems and just thumb through to find one that seems interesting. We have poetry collections by many well-known poets: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, James Whitcomb Riley and many more. You could also try a collection of selected poems by many different poets. Caroline Kennedy edited a book of her mother’s favorite poems that is great to browse through.

kennedy

You may want to try a more recent poet such as Maya Angelou or Billy Collins. As you read, keep in mind that poetry often challenges us to see the world in different ways or from alternate perspectives.

angelou  

We have a very nice set of short biographies of some well-known poets. Included in the books are some of the poet’s best known poems. Perhaps knowing something about the person will help you connect with the poetry. Poets in the series are Walt Whitman, E.E. Cummings, Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare.

walt whitman

If you want something short and sweet, and you are a nature-lover, pick up The Cuckoo’s Haiku, featuring beautiful watercolor bird illustrations by Stan Fellows.

haiku

Here are some other books to get you started. Be sure to also check out the selections from the Indiana Digital Download Center. There is a featured collection on the main menu for National Poetry Month.

bicycles blanco

borrowed names  simic

dogs   heaney

kumin   teen

plath   kay ryan

 

April is National Poetry Month

April is a month I look forward to each year – not just for the springtime weather, but also for the chance to highlight some of the Library’s wonderful poetry books. This post will just cover books of poems for kids, and I’ll highlight Adult and Teen poetry in another post.

sidewalk    light

If you ask kids about their favorite poetry, they will almost always talk about the great Shel Silverstein. His books like Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the Attic are truly amazing, but Silverstein is just a beginning point. Here are some more great suggestions for kids of all ages.

Jack Prelutsky’s collections of poems are almost as funny as those of Shel Silverstein. You might want to begin with Something Big Has Been Here or It’s Raining Pigs & Noodles.

big    pigs

A shorter collection by Prelutsky that I highly recommend for older kids who can understand a more subtle form of humor is Stardines Swim High Across the Sky and Other Poems. In addition to writing original poetry, Prelutsky has edited numerous collections that contain poems by lots of writers. He was also selected in 2006 by the Poetry Foundation to serve a two year term as the first Children’s Poet Laureate.

stardines

I also love the poetry books of Douglas Florian. He typically publishes short collections of poems that are all on the same theme. April would be a wonderful time to share Poem Runs: Baseball Poems and Paintings. Kids are guaranteed to love Dinothesaurus: Prehistoric Poems and Paintings, and I am a big fan of Poetrees.

poem runs     dino

poetrees

For kids who love nature, I recommend the poetry books of Joyce Sidman. Start with Songs of the Water Boatman and Other Pond Poems and then move on to Ubiquitous and Dark Emperor and other Poems of the Night. All of these books contain both poems and informational text.

boatman

Don’t just read poetry this month. Try your hand at writing some; it would be a great family activity. Don’t know how to get started? We have books to help you!

pizza     read a rhyme

writing

 

Helen Frost – Hoosier Author

During this Indiana Bicentennial year, I will be introducing you to some amazing Indiana authors. Helen Frost, a resident of Fort Wayne, is a poet, playwright and novelist all rolled into one. Writing and teaching have been the interwoven strands of her career. She has taught in far-flung locations such as California, Alaska and Scotland.

She has written over 20 non-fiction books for beginning readers, but the two shown below stand out for Frost’s descriptions of the natural world. Monarch and Milkweed explains the relationship between the butterflies and the milkweed plant in lyrical prose, and the jewel-toned illustrations by Leonid Gore help to make this one of the best monarch butterfly books you will ever find. Frost invites us to look closely at the small creatures all around us in Step Gently Out, which features close-up photography of insects by Rick Lieder.

milkweed   step gently

Helen Frost is well-known for the novels-in-verse she has written for upper elementary and teen readers. Before reading one of these books, look for the author’s note that explains the poetry. Frost is always intentional in using forms of poetry that reflect the culture and characters she writes about. Her novel Keesha’s House won a Printz Honor Award in 2004 and uses sonnets and sestinas to relate a story of multiple perspectives. The Braid depicts a Scottish family separated through the immigration of some family members; the poems are braided together to represent a Celtic knot.

keesha     braid

Diamond Willow is set in the Athabascan culture of Alaska. Frost drew inspirations for her poetry style from the scars that form when a branch of a diamond willow shrub is broken away. Look for a hidden message in the center of each diamond-shaped poem! In each of her novels, Frost uses poetry to bring deeper meaning to the stories and to enhance the reader’s experience. Salt should be of particular interest this year as a historical novel set in Indiana during the War of 1812.

diamond      crossing stones

hidden     salt

Give one of these amazing books a chance, even if poetry is not something you would normally choose. You’ll be glad you did! For more information, you can watch an interview with Helen Frost posted by the Allen County Library.