Guess the Book from the First Sentence Answers

Did you play along with the last blog post about guessing the title of a book from the opening lines? Let’s see how well you did! Here are the answers:

Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Chances are you’ve read one or more of these children’s classics, so how well did you do? What about the next round?

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Did any of these classics ring a bell? Hopefully they did! Next!

The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

1984 by George Orwell

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

What about the bonus? It might have been a little tricky!

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

So how well did you do? I’d love to know in the comments! Happy Reading!

Guess the Book from the First Sentence

Sometimes the opening line of a book will stick with you forever. Here are some opening lines of popular books you might have read. See if you can guess which book they’re from!

“All children, except one, grow up.”

“Mr. and Mrs. Dursley of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much.”

“”Where’s Papa going with that ax?” said Fern to her mother as they were setting the table for breakfast.”

“Once there were four children whose names were Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. This story is about something that happened to them when they were sent away from London during the war because of the air-raids.”

“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.”

Those were kind of easy. Ready for a few more?

“Call me Ishmael. Some years ago — never mind how long precisely — having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.”

“In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. Whenever you feel like criticizing any one, he told me,  just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

“Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small, unregarded yellow sun.”

“When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home.”

“It was a pleasure to burn.”

Last ones!

“This is my favorite book in all the world, though I have never read it.”

“Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself.”

“All this happened, more or less.”

“It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.”

“In the corner of a first-class smoking carriage, Mr. Justice Wargrave, lately retired from the bench, puffed at a cigar and ran an interested eye through the political news in the Times.”

Bonus!

“It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York.”

Good luck! Comment what your guesses were to see if you’re right!