Let’s Take a Moment: My Sister’s Keeper

my-sisters-keeperBefore I begin this blog post let me just say one thing: I don’t like lessons in stories. I’m strictly a romance reader and I don’t like learning anything besides words. So stating this, I don’t particularly like Jodi Picoult mainly because of this reason. Then a co-worker and a classmate of mine told me about My Sister’s Keeper. I’d seen the movie and loved it but they had told me that the book was completely different than the movie, so I chose to check this book out and read it.

“It’s about a girl who is on the cusp of becoming someone… A girl who may not know what she wants right now, and she may not know who she is right now, but who deserves the chance to find out.” -Campbell Alexander

Let me begin by saying….WOW! This book is probably one of my favorites as of now. I will admit I did find it hard to like Sara, the mother, in the book. The book started out great and somehow drew me in. I already knew the synopsis of the story but for some reason Picoult’s writing just kept me entrapped and entertained. Not only did she include Anna’s point of view but everyone else’s and their back story.

Anna is thirteen in the beginning of this book and she’s selling a locket her father had given her. Her sister, Kate, has cancer and her brother, Jesse, is a troublemaker. Of course, with Kate having cancer all things center around her. Anna herself was conceived to be a donor for Kate. So throughout the book, we learn just how often Anna has been a donor for Kate and the tumultuous actions of these characters as they try to understand Kate’s illness. The story focuses on Anna’s fight for the medical right of her own body because they want Anna to give her kidney to Kate. So, enter Campbell Alexander and Julia. Campbell is the lawyer who decides to help Anna pro-bono and Julia is Campbell’s high school sweetheart and ad-litem (a person who represents a child who cannot represent themselves and decides the right course of action for them). They both decide to help Anna as they solve their own crisis.

“If you have a sister and she dies, do you stop saying you have one? Or are you always a sister, even when the other half of the equation is gone?”- Anna Fitzgerald

This isn’t a story about the selfishness of a thirteen-year-old or the fact that she wants attention. This is a story that shows you selflessness and sacrifice in its purest form.

We see the story from all different points of views. From Brian’s (the father) to Julia’s and in doing so, Picoult has not only helped us understand the Fitzgerald family and the supporting characters but cancer and what it does to a family. As I stated above, I didn’t like Sara, mainly because it seemed like she was devoting herself to Kate and neglecting her other children. Then again, I do not have a child dying of cancer or any children to be exact.

The movie and the book are more different than any book turned movie I’ve ever seen. I felt as if they told two completely different stories. As always the book went more in depth with the Fitzgerald’s but not only did the movie change the climax but it changed the ending, and that’s not okay!

“There should be a statute of limitation on grief. A rule book that says it is all right to wake up crying, but only for a month. That after 42 days you will no longer turn with your heart racing, certain you have heard her call out your name. That there will be no fine imposed if you feel the need to clean out her desk; take down her artwork from the refrigerator; turn over a school portrait as you pass – if only because it cuts you fresh again to see it. That it’s okay to measure the time she has been gone, the way we once measured her birthdays.” – Anna Fitzgerald

Reviews:

The author vividly evokes the physical and psychic toll a desperately sick child imposes on a family, even a close and loving one like the Fitzgeralds… there can be no easy outcomes in a tale about individual autonomy clashing with a sibling’s right to life, but Picoult thwarts out expectations in unexpected ways… a telling portrait of a profoundly stressed family.

-Kirkus Reviews

five-out-of-five

 

“I learn from my own daughter that you don’t have to be awake to cry.” – Sara Fitzgerald

Must Reads Before The Movie Releases

Fall 2016 has some awesome books that are being released as movies and you have to check them out! You still have time to read them before the movie is released. Come in today and check one out!

original_The_Girl_on_the_Train

The Girl on the Train – October 7

A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls – October 14

Inferno Dan Brown

Inferno – October 14

I smile Back

I smile back – October 23

Brooklyn Tolbin

Brooklyn – Nov 4

room-book-cover

Room – Nov 6

Fantastic_beasts

Fantastic beasts and where to find them – Nov 18

Which one of these are you most looking forward to becoming a movie? I know I can’t wait to see The Girl on the Train.

 

 

Dome Theater

Dome

The Dome Theater will be back in town with an exciting selection of science shows. Bring the entire family to the Aurora Public Library on June 16th for this unique experience. Shows are open to all ages beginning at 11 AM through 5:30 PM, and will begin approximately every 30 minutes. From 6 to 7 PM, the Theater will be reserved for teens attending our Thursday evening program. The schedule is shown below, although we ask you to be flexible. Seating inside the dome is limited and if we have a large crowd, you may be asked to wait for a later show. Kids loved this the last time the theater was in town, so load up a carload of neighborhood kids and come down!

Dinosaur-Prophecy_small  Into-The-Deep_small

The Dinosaur Prophecy: 11 AM and 2:30 PM

Into The Deep: 11:30 AM and 3:00 PM

TimeSpace: 12:00 PM and 3:30 PM

Fantasy Worlds: 12:30 PM and 4:00 PM

Future Moon: 1:00 PM and 4:30 PM

Habitat Earth: 1:30 PM and 5:00

Into the Deep: 6:00 PM (Teens only)

Sonic Vision: 6:30 PM (Teens only)

Fantasy-Worlds_poster_small  Future-Moon_small

 

Family Time

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Feel like you do the same old things everyday???

Looking for something different to do? The library has many options for a fun evening with a little imagination. What about dinner & a movie? We have movies available for any audience. Maybe a family movie night.

Ingredients:
1. Check out a family movie!

2. Plan your dinner and snacks with a theme related to the movie! Check out the book Dinner & a movie.

Second Hand Lions  – a Family Movie (PG) great middle school age movie to have a conversation around.

A coming-of-age story about a shy, young boy sent by his irresponsible mother to spend the summer with his wealthy, eccentric uncles in Texas.

So maybe a little Texas barbeque, fries and lemonade for dinner!

Start the movie and fill your plates and Enjoy Family Time!

 

 

 

It’s Oscar time.

Books-Oscar-2016-nominations-are-based-onNominees have been announced, and excitement builds as everyone rushes to watch the most recent prospects still in theaters. But did you know 9 of the movies were based on books? I love going to the theater to see a movie, it’s a special treat in my family, one we don’t do very often. Popcorn with butter, soda, and sometimes candy and we settle in to immerse ourselves in another persons’ life for 90 minutes or so. Reading gives me the same thrills, chills, joy and excitement, and when you use your public library, is much more affordable than a cinema.

All five nominees for the best-adapted screenplay were based on or inspired by books.

  1. Brooklyn directed by John Crowley, boasts three nominations; Best Picture, Best Actress and of course, Best Adapted Screenplay. The novel was written by an Irish author, Colm Toilin.
  2. Carol tells the story of Therese, a young stage designer in a department store, and her passionate affair with Carol, a housewife entangled in a hostile divorce. The book is titled The Price of Salt  by Patricia Highsmith.
  3. The Martian , written by Andy Weir, and the movie starring Matt Damon.
  4. Room written by Emma Donoghue was the basis for the movie of the same name and has earned 4 nominations; Best Picture, Best Directing, Best Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay.

The other 4 books that made their way to the big screen and to the Oscars are The Danish Girl, written by David Ebershoff, Steve Jobs written by Walter Isaacson, The Revenant by Michael Punke and last but not least the film Embrace the Serpent, a story based on diaries written by two scientists, Theodor Koch-Grunberg and Richard Evans Schultes, who spent 40 years in the Colombian Amazon in search  of an elusive healing plant.

The Big Short starring Ryan Gosling and Christian Bale is based on the book of the same name written by Michael Lewis.

So before you settle in to watch the 88th Academy Awards on February 28th come see us at the library and check out the books. The movies will be available for check out as soon as they are released on DVD.