Notice Any Changes?

In the last few weeks,  changes have been made to the Aurora Branch’s collection. For quite some time, we’ve had issues with crowded shelves. This creates issues  when you search for your next great read. No one wants  to grab one book from the shelf, only for two or three to come out with it. Now, you don’t have to worry about the crowded shelves! We’ve rearranged many areas in the library to make it more user-friendly for everyone. Most of the changes have taken effect on the upper level.

Instead of now beginning our upstairs nonfiction collection at 590, we now begin our upstairs nonfiction at 600, located in the main room where our biography collection was housed near the top of the stairs. The nonfiction on the upper level wraps around the shelves until reaching the “New Book” area and then continues into the West Wing until it ends. This change was to simplify the nonfiction collection.

Teens have been moved to a whole new area. They are no longer in the East Wing near the elevator. They’ve been moved to the West Wing behind the magazine section. This is to give teens a more  private area. We have more changes in store for the teen area that will hopefully be taking effect in the coming months.

The adult fiction collection has grown. There will be more space on the shelves for new books and the shelves will be less crowded. (James Patterson, we’re looking at you!)

Basically, all these changes create more space on the shelves for more books, reduce overcrowded areas, and make the collection more user-friendly. While it will take some time getting used to the new locations of your favorite authors, eventually, it’ll be as if they’ve been there this whole time!

If you are having trouble locating an item, please seek assistance at the desk!

 

Stuck Between the Pages Final Meeting

The YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will have it’s final meeting on November 12, 2019 at 6pm. We will be discussing the book: Pay it Forward by: Catherine Ryan Hyde and its movie adaptation that we will be watching on November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. While we have been happy to see young adults enjoying the book club, we do not have enough interest to continue the book discussion group for next year.

About the Book:

The story of how a boy who believed in the goodness of human nature set out to change the world.

Pay It Forward is a wondrous and moving novel about Trevor McKinney, a twelve-year-old boy in a small California town who accepts the challenge that his teacher gives his class, a chance to earn extra credit by coming up with a plan to change the world for the better — and to put that plan into action.

The idea that Trevor comes up with is so simple and so naïve that when others learn of it they are dismissive. Even Trevor himself begins to doubt when his “pay it forward” plan seems to founder on a combination of bad luck and the worst of human nature.

In the end, Pay It Forward is the story of seemingly ordinary people made extraordinary by the simple faith of a child. In the tradition of the successful and inspirational television show Touched by an Angel, and the phenomenally successful novel and film Forrest GumpPay It Forward is a work of charm, wit, and remarkable inspiration, a story of hope for today and for many tomorrows to come.

 

 

Unicorns, Unicorns, and More Unicorns

Unicorns….what’s not to love about unicorns? Children everywhere are falling in love with them, and many children’s authors and illustrators are picking up on the trend. More and more books are coming out with a unicorn character. Why? Because this gives the author and illustrator a more creative outlet. Unicorns can be anything you want them to be. They can be any color, have any power, do anything you want them to do. That’s why they’re so magical!

The Very Short, Entirely True History of Unicorns  Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima

Unicorn Thinks He's Really Great by Bob Shea   Unicorns 101 by Cale Atkinson

Uni's First Sleepover by Amy Krouse Rosenthal  The Midnight Unicorn by Neil Reed

Twelve Dancing Unicorns by Alissa Heyman  Unicorn Day by Diana Murray

How the Crayons Saved the Unicorn by Monica Sweeney  Stories of Unicorns by Rosie Dickins

See a book that caught your eye? Click on the picture and put the book on hold today!

Teen Movie Night: Pay it Forward

The Aurora Public Library District and the YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will be presenting a movie presentation of Pay it Forward (PG13), the movie adaptation of the SBTP November book selection. The movie presentation will take place on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. There will be refreshments served. You don’t have to be part of the book discussion group to come see this movie!

Seventh grader Trevor (Haley Joel Osment) has every reason to believe that life is harsh and painful. His parents are alcoholics and his father is either absent or abusive. He walks into school every day through a metal detector. Outside his classroom window is an endless expanse of desert. And his mom works two jobs in a city filled with despair, Las Vegas. But then his teacher Eugene (Kevin Spacey) encourages his students to “backflip” the world into something better. He doesn’t expect much — maybe a clean-up of some graffiti. But Trevor decides to do three important favors for people who need them. Then, instead of allowing them to pay it back, he will ask each of them to “pay it forward,” doing three favors for other people, and asking them to do the same. One of Trevor’s favors is to bring his mother Arlene and Eugene together, though it turns out that it’s not just to make them happier. Arlene and Eugene put all of their effort into making sure they don’t get hurt again until they learn that it’s risking hurt that makes us alive.

The movie is PG-13.

Census Application Help Sessions

Looking for a temporary job? Want to earn some extra income? Well, look no further!

The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting thousands of people for temporary jobs across the country. The results of the 2020 Census will  help determine each state’s representation in Congress, as well as how funds are spent for schools, hospitals, library’s, roads, and so much more!

Job Qualifications:

  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Have a valid Social Security number.
  • Be a U.S. Citizen.
  • Have a valid email address.
  • Complete an application and answer assessment questions.
  • Be registered in the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption.
  • Pass a Census-performed criminal background check.
  • Commit to complete training.
  • Be available to work flexible hours, which can include days, evenings, and/or weekends.

Most census jobs require employees to:

  • Have access to a vehicle and a valid driver’s license.
  • Have access to a computer with internet and an email account (to complete training).

If you currently have a job, your current job must be compatible with Census Bureau employment and must not create any conflicts of interest. They will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

2020 Census jobs provide:

  • $15+ per hour
  • Flexible hours
  • Weekly pay
  • Paid training

For more information attend one of two of our Census Application Help Sessions:

Monday, October 28: 10am-1pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

or

Saturday, November 2: 9am-12pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

Census personnel will be on site to answer any and all questions. There will be 3 computers set aside for these help sessions.

It’s Hocus Pocus Time

 

It’s October! You know what that means? It’s Halloween! Time to get spooky! Which in turn means, it’s Hocus Pocus time!

The Aurora Public Library District invites you to join us in a spooky viewing of the beloved Halloween classic: Hocus Pocus! This movie event is for all ages and will take place on October 29th, 2019 at 6pm. There will be some Halloween-themed goody bags, popcorn, and drinks!

If we don’t see you here…we’ll put a spell on you!!

 

 

Into “The Pit” with Poe

Do you love creepy stories? Do mysteries make your heart race, especially when mixed with a bit of paranoia? Edgar Allen Poe may be just the author you’ve been looking for! Poe is one of America’s best-loved authors and, of course, is perfect for Halloween.

Join us on Tuesday evening, October 22nd for selected readings from Poe’s short stories and poems. The program will begin at 7 pm at the Aurora Public Library and will be led by Ron Nicholson of Ivy Tech. We’ll also get to hear some about the latest theories of Poe’s mysterious death. After the program, you’ll want to check out our books related to all things Poe, including poetry, short stories and modern retellings.

Deep into that darkness peering,

long I stood there, wondering, fearing,

doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. (from “The Raven”)

 The Pit and the Pendulum graphic adaptation Edgar Allen Poe by Aaron Frisch The Poems of Edgar Allen Poe

Edgar Allen Poe by Jeff Burlingame Masque of the Red Death retelling Steampunk Poe

Libby: One Tap App

The power of an app is almighty. However, if the app is too complicated to use, more likely than not, we’ll delete it. There are thousands of apps for social media, a million for gaming, and hundreds for reading. While Overdrive was the original reading app for the Aurora Public Library digital library patrons to use, we’ve been introduced to a new app called Libby, which was created by the same company that created Overdrive.

Libby is a simple to use reading app. While Overdrive has many tabs you have to click to do one simple thing, Libby is a one tap app. Once you download Libby, and login using your library card number and pin, you can start looking for titles on the very next page. Libby takes away several steps that Overdrive has and simplifies it. You can do so many amazing things with Libby!

You can add more than one library card.

You can listen to audiobooks at your own pace.

You can adjust your reading settings (font, size, space).

You can filter your Preferences to see books for specific age groups (kids, teens, adults).

You can borrow eBooks from our library and send them to your kindle!

You can change the lending period on the titles you borrow.

You can borrow magazines, eBooks, and audio books as well as videos!

The only downfall to Libby? She’s not available on as many devices as Overdrive is. Libby is only available on google Play, Apple Store, and Microsoft store. However, the creators of the app are working diligently to make Libby more compatible with other devices as well. Don’t worry though, you can set Libby to send eBooks to your kindle and still be able to read on your kindle!

Post-It Note Memoirs

Recently, we had a display up at the Aurora branch inviting our patrons to write a six-word memoir. We left this display up for roughly two months and received many post-it memoirs from our patrons. The prompt was: Tell us your story in six words or less!

Basically, we wanted patrons to write down a simplified version of their life’s memoir. They could either sign it with their name, or leave it unsigned, it was their choice! Here are some we received:

“My life began at 30.”

“I miss you, Bob, my brother.”

“I feel like I’m nothing inside.”

“Getting depression changed my life…”

“I can see.”

“Found..myself, my love, my family.”

“Through the valleys, love sustains me.”

“I died, but I am back.”

“Found my love, my family, my friends.”

“I used to be deaf.”

“I live life to the fullest.”

“A struggle to maintain my sanity.”

“Read. Work. Work. Eat. Sleep. Read.”

“I have cancer…” “My life changed.”

“I strive to be kind and happy every day.”

“Always live your life moving forward.”

This was a creative way for our patrons to interact with a display and give it a personal touch. To read more six-word memoirs,  check out the book that goes with this display:

  • A collection of six-word memoirs, contributed by both famous and obscure writers, records the human experience in works that are by turn whimsical, poignant, and bizarre, by such authors as Joyce Carol Oates and Joan Rivers.
Six Word Memoirs

Thank you to all those who participated!

Roald Dahl: #1 Storyteller

Roald Dahl was a spy, a pilot, a chocolate historian and an inventor!

He was also a beloved author of many original and entertaining children’s books.

Roald Dahl was born in Wales on September 13, 1916 to Harald Dahl and Sofie Hesselberg. His parents named him after the first man to reach the South Pole, Roald Amundsen.

His mother sent him to several boarding schools in which many bizarre events happened and later were written in his autobiography, Boy. At one of his boarding schools, the pupils were invited to test chocolate bars which helped inspire Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. 

His lust to travel took him from Canada to East Africa until the start of World War II where he enlisted into the Royal Air Force at 23 years old. After receiving severe injuries in the Western Desert, and after recovering from those injuries in Alexandria, he returned to the fight by taking part in the Battle of Athens. Afterwards, he became a spy for MI6.

In 1961, he wrote James and the Giant Peach, which was quickly followed by Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He also wrote several screenplays and adult novels. In 1970, a year before the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory was released, he published Fantastic Mr. Fox

In the early 80s, he published The Twits, The BFG, and The WitchesMatilda was published in 1988 and Esio Trot in 1990.

Many of his works have been adapted as films and will forever entertain children and adults for generations to come!

To help us celebrate Roald Dahl, stop by the library on Roald Dahl Day (September 13) and check out some his works and adaptations!