Racial Equity Resources

Let's Talk About Race by Julius Lester On the Playground: Our First Talk About Prejudice by Dr. Jillian Roberts I Walk With Vanessa by Kerascoet

The Aurora Public Library District was recently awarded a $1,000.00 Advancing Racial Equity Collection Development Grant by Indiana Humanities with funds from Lilly Endowment Inc. This grant has allowed the Aurora Public Library District to add a variety of materials to the Library District’s collection in regards to diversity, systemic racism, inequitable policing, and protest. The materials purchased through this grant were selected from a list of over 100 titles that had been curated by librarians, with input from humanities scholars. 

Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer (DVD) You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

It is the hope of the Aurora Public Library District that these materials will help our communities learn about racial equity. In selecting titles to purchase, it was the goal of the Library District to offer materials that are appropriate for all ages and in a variety of formats. There are picture books to share with young children, books to encourage frank family discussions, and items to challenge us all to better understand the events that have taken place in our country over the past months and years. Reading a book or watching a DVD on racial justice can serve as an entry point, but we also hope that these resources will lead to deeper reflection and to conversations throughout our community. Lists of the purchased items have been provided to local educators for use in their classrooms, and we also welcome their use by other community organizations.

The purchased materials will be on display at the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library throughout the month of November. A full list of the new items is available on request.

This is My America by Kim Johnson Guilty Until Proven Guilty (DVD)  Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People by Banaji and Greenwald

The History of Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is a national, month-long observance of the often overlooked contributions of women in history and contemporary society. In the United States it is celebrated in March to coincide with International Women’s Day on March 8th.  The first National Women’s History Month was celebrated in 1987, but it was celebrated by smaller communities long before then. The process took years of hard work and lobbying by women to gain the recognition they deserved.

In 1979, a fifteen-day conference co-sponsored by Sarah Lawrence, the Women’s Action Alliance, and the Smithsonian Institution was held at Sarah Lawrence College in New York. The conference was organized by one of the professors at the college, Gerda Lerner. Her goal was to introduce female leaders with diverse backgrounds to the possibilities of women’s history. Lerner, along with historians Alice Kessler-Harris and Amy Swerdlow, challenged the participants to create one large group project. Their chosen project was to make the celebration of Women’s History Week, an event already celebrated by some schools, communities, and women’s organizations, a national event.

At the end of the conference, the women returned to their homes all across the country and began the campaign for a National Women’s History Week. They planned and scheduled publicly sponsored women’s history programs at both the local and national level. The women successfully lobbied for national recognition, and in February of 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8 as National Women’s History Week.

Subsequent presidents continued to proclaim a National Women’s History Week in March for the next several years. The popularity grew, and schools across the United States started their own local celebrations of Women’s History Week, and even expanding into the entire month of March. By 1986, fourteen states declared March as Women’s History Month, and finally, in 1987, Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as Women’s History Month nationally.

The National Women’s History Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to honoring and preserving women’s history, and a large contributor to the fight for a nationally recognized month, selects the yearly theme and honorees for Women’s History Month. The 2020 theme is “Valiant Women of the Vote” in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. The theme honors women “from the original suffrage movement as well as 20th and 21st century women who have continued the struggle (fighting against poll taxes, literacy tests, voter roll purges, and other more contemporary forms of voter suppression) to ensure voting rights for all.” The 2020 honorees include Maria Teresa Kumar, Edith Mayo, Lucy Burns, Carrie Chapman Catt, and many other incredible women who have fought and continue to fight for voting rights for everyone. Click HERE for more information on this year’s theme and honorees.

You can learn more about women’s history, and celebrate Women’s History Month, by checking out our collection of books about women’s contributions to history and society! Click on any title to learn more!

Bold and Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to VoteSuffrage: Women's Long Battle for the VoteThe Encyclopedia of Women's History in America

Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists   Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One    D-Day Girls: The Untold Stories of the Female Spies Who Helped Win World War II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020 Hours of Service

In order to better serve the community, some of our operating hours will change, beginning on January 2, 2020. The changes are shown in red.

The Aurora Public Library

Monday 10 am – 6 pm

Tuesday 10 am – 8 pm

Wednesday 10 am – 6 pm

Thursday 10 am – 8 pm

Friday 10 am – 6 pm

Saturday 10 am – 3 pm

The Dillsboro Public Library

Monday 10 am – 6 pm

Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm

Wednesday 10 am – 6 pm

Thursday 10 am – 6 pm

Friday 10 am – 6 pm

Saturday 10 am – 3 pm

 

The Local History Library
@ the Depot

Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm

Wednesday 10 am – 6 pm

Thursday 10 am – 6 pm

1st & 3rd Saturday 10 am – 3 pm

(closed each day 12:30-1 pm)

 

 

Celebrate with a Cookie!

Why not start off your holiday season with a stop by one of our library branches on Saturday, December 7th? Both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library will have Christmas cookies to ice and sprinkle, and Peggy will be sharing some of our newest Christmas picture books. (One book is from a favorite tri-state children’s author.) The stories will be at 10:30 am at the Aurora Branch and at 11:30 am at the Dillsboro Branch. Cookies will be waiting for you between 10:30 am and 1 pm. The towns of Aurora and Dillsboro will have lots of “holiday happenings” that day, so you’ll be able to put cookies and books on your list of fun things to do!

Dasher by Matt Tavares

Happy holidays from the staff at the Library!

Notice Any Changes?

In the last few weeks,  changes have been made to the Aurora Branch’s collection. For quite some time, we’ve had issues with crowded shelves. This creates issues  when you search for your next great read. No one wants  to grab one book from the shelf, only for two or three to come out with it. Now, you don’t have to worry about the crowded shelves! We’ve rearranged many areas in the library to make it more user-friendly for everyone. Most of the changes have taken effect on the upper level.

Instead of now beginning our upstairs nonfiction collection at 590, we now begin our upstairs nonfiction at 600, located in the main room where our biography collection was housed near the top of the stairs. The nonfiction on the upper level wraps around the shelves until reaching the “New Book” area and then continues into the West Wing until it ends. This change was to simplify the nonfiction collection.

Teens have been moved to a whole new area. They are no longer in the East Wing near the elevator. They’ve been moved to the West Wing behind the magazine section. This is to give teens a more  private area. We have more changes in store for the teen area that will hopefully be taking effect in the coming months.

The adult fiction collection has grown. There will be more space on the shelves for new books and the shelves will be less crowded. (James Patterson, we’re looking at you!)

Basically, all these changes create more space on the shelves for more books, reduce overcrowded areas, and make the collection more user-friendly. While it will take some time getting used to the new locations of your favorite authors, eventually, it’ll be as if they’ve been there this whole time!

If you are having trouble locating an item, please seek assistance at the desk!

 

Stuck Between the Pages Final Meeting

The YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will have it’s final meeting on November 12, 2019 at 6pm. We will be discussing the book: Pay it Forward by: Catherine Ryan Hyde and its movie adaptation that we will be watching on November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. While we have been happy to see young adults enjoying the book club, we do not have enough interest to continue the book discussion group for next year.

About the Book:

The story of how a boy who believed in the goodness of human nature set out to change the world.

Pay It Forward is a wondrous and moving novel about Trevor McKinney, a twelve-year-old boy in a small California town who accepts the challenge that his teacher gives his class, a chance to earn extra credit by coming up with a plan to change the world for the better — and to put that plan into action.

The idea that Trevor comes up with is so simple and so naïve that when others learn of it they are dismissive. Even Trevor himself begins to doubt when his “pay it forward” plan seems to founder on a combination of bad luck and the worst of human nature.

In the end, Pay It Forward is the story of seemingly ordinary people made extraordinary by the simple faith of a child. In the tradition of the successful and inspirational television show Touched by an Angel, and the phenomenally successful novel and film Forrest GumpPay It Forward is a work of charm, wit, and remarkable inspiration, a story of hope for today and for many tomorrows to come.

 

 

Unicorns, Unicorns, and More Unicorns

Unicorns….what’s not to love about unicorns? Children everywhere are falling in love with them, and many children’s authors and illustrators are picking up on the trend. More and more books are coming out with a unicorn character. Why? Because this gives the author and illustrator a more creative outlet. Unicorns can be anything you want them to be. They can be any color, have any power, do anything you want them to do. That’s why they’re so magical!

The Very Short, Entirely True History of Unicorns  Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima

Unicorn Thinks He's Really Great by Bob Shea   Unicorns 101 by Cale Atkinson

Uni's First Sleepover by Amy Krouse Rosenthal  The Midnight Unicorn by Neil Reed

Twelve Dancing Unicorns by Alissa Heyman  Unicorn Day by Diana Murray

How the Crayons Saved the Unicorn by Monica Sweeney  Stories of Unicorns by Rosie Dickins

See a book that caught your eye? Click on the picture and put the book on hold today!

Teen Movie Night: Pay it Forward

The Aurora Public Library District and the YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will be presenting a movie presentation of Pay it Forward (PG13), the movie adaptation of the SBTP November book selection. The movie presentation will take place on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. There will be refreshments served. You don’t have to be part of the book discussion group to come see this movie!

Seventh grader Trevor (Haley Joel Osment) has every reason to believe that life is harsh and painful. His parents are alcoholics and his father is either absent or abusive. He walks into school every day through a metal detector. Outside his classroom window is an endless expanse of desert. And his mom works two jobs in a city filled with despair, Las Vegas. But then his teacher Eugene (Kevin Spacey) encourages his students to “backflip” the world into something better. He doesn’t expect much — maybe a clean-up of some graffiti. But Trevor decides to do three important favors for people who need them. Then, instead of allowing them to pay it back, he will ask each of them to “pay it forward,” doing three favors for other people, and asking them to do the same. One of Trevor’s favors is to bring his mother Arlene and Eugene together, though it turns out that it’s not just to make them happier. Arlene and Eugene put all of their effort into making sure they don’t get hurt again until they learn that it’s risking hurt that makes us alive.

The movie is PG-13.

Census Application Help Sessions

Looking for a temporary job? Want to earn some extra income? Well, look no further!

The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting thousands of people for temporary jobs across the country. The results of the 2020 Census will  help determine each state’s representation in Congress, as well as how funds are spent for schools, hospitals, library’s, roads, and so much more!

Job Qualifications:

  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Have a valid Social Security number.
  • Be a U.S. Citizen.
  • Have a valid email address.
  • Complete an application and answer assessment questions.
  • Be registered in the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption.
  • Pass a Census-performed criminal background check.
  • Commit to complete training.
  • Be available to work flexible hours, which can include days, evenings, and/or weekends.

Most census jobs require employees to:

  • Have access to a vehicle and a valid driver’s license.
  • Have access to a computer with internet and an email account (to complete training).

If you currently have a job, your current job must be compatible with Census Bureau employment and must not create any conflicts of interest. They will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

2020 Census jobs provide:

  • $15+ per hour
  • Flexible hours
  • Weekly pay
  • Paid training

For more information attend one of two of our Census Application Help Sessions:

Monday, October 28: 10am-1pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

or

Saturday, November 2: 9am-12pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

Census personnel will be on site to answer any and all questions. There will be 3 computers set aside for these help sessions.

It’s Hocus Pocus Time

 

It’s October! You know what that means? It’s Halloween! Time to get spooky! Which in turn means, it’s Hocus Pocus time!

The Aurora Public Library District invites you to join us in a spooky viewing of the beloved Halloween classic: Hocus Pocus! This movie event is for all ages and will take place on October 29th, 2019 at 6pm. There will be some Halloween-themed goody bags, popcorn, and drinks!

If we don’t see you here…we’ll put a spell on you!!