Book Series Spotlight: Gone

This blog post was written by Brett Weaver, a college student who has been working at the Aurora Public Library District this summer, getting a behind-the-scenes look at Public Library service.

Are you a fan of the terror and suspense that comes from Stephen King novels? Or do you prefer the action and adventure that comes from an X-Men film? Then again, perhaps you are looking for something thought-provoking and themed around survival, like William Golding’s Lord of the Flies? While the library contains a fine selection of all three works, what if I were to tell you that there was a single book series that contained all three concepts, as well as so much more? If that sounds interesting, then look no further than Michael Grant’s Gone series.

Hunger by Michael Grant     Lies by Michael Grant

Set in a fictionalized Southern California town, Grant takes readers through the experience of what happens to the population of the town’s average teenage population, as well as the nearby teens of a private school for “troubled” youth, when all the residents older than fourteen disappear without a trace. Cut off from the outside world by a mysterious force-field, with no power, no internet, and little food, lines are quickly drawn and sides are quickly chosen as some of the teens attempt to figure out what happened to the adults, while also keeping themselves alive. Oh, and some of the kids develop superpowers. Did I mention the superpowers?

Plague by Michael Grant      Fear by Michael Grant    Light by Michael Grant

New in Non-Fiction

Maybe you’ve noticed that we’ve been adding a lot of new non-fiction books to our collection lately. The role of non-fiction books in public libraries has evolved in the past thirty years, with fewer people using print reference books, but with many people still reading popular non-fiction for pleasure or in support of a hobby. We try to purchase books from a variety of viewpoints (politics, anyone?) and buy many of the books on current best-seller lists. We are always open to suggestions, so don’t be shy about making recommendations! If there is a particular area of the collection that you think we need to update, feel free to let us know.

Here’s a sampling of the non-fiction titles currently on the New Shelf at one of our branches. We don’t always buy a copy for each branch, so once you scroll past the images, I’ll explain a way to see the new non-fiction at “the other branch”.

The Weather Machine by Andrew Blum Unfreedom of the Press by Mark R. Levin The Stressed Years of Their Lives by Hibbs and Rostain The Last Pirate of New York by Rich Cohen

The Idle Beekeeper by Bill Anderson The Family Next Door by John Glatt Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz A Tree in the House by Annabelle Hickson

Rough Magic by Lara Prior Palmer Reading Behind Bars by Jill Grunenwald One-Stitch Baby Knits by Val Pierce On the Clock by Emily Guendelsberger

Grow Your Own Herbs by Selsinger and Tucker Gather at the River by various authors Furious Hours by Casey Cep Chaos by Tom O'Neill

Down From the Mountain by Bryce Andrews  Blended Embroidery by Brian Haggard Beneath the Tamarind Sky by Isha Sesay Ballpark by Paul Goldberger

Basic Welding by William Galvery    Songs of America by Meacham and McGraw   Macrame for Home Decor by Samantha Grenier

There are actual two simple ways to search for new items that may not be at your regular branch. First, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame on the right-side of the page, select On-Line Catalog and hit “Go!” without entering a search term. This gets you into the catalog. You should see a tab labeled “New at the Library”. Click on that, and you can scroll through all the items added in the last couple of weeks.

Another method is to use the “Classic Catalog”. Again, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame, click on “Looking for the Classic Catalog.” Under the heading Classic Catalog, click on “Submit” without entering a search term. Follow the rest of these steps to locate new non-fiction:

  • Click “Search”.
  • Click on the “New” tab and select a time period in the box called “Received Since”.
  • Click “Set Limits” and scroll through the collection box to find “Non-Fiction.”
  • Select “All Branches”, “Aurora”, or “Dillsboro”, and hit “OK”
  • When it takes you back to the orange “New” screen, just click on “Search”
  • You should have a list of the newest Non-Fiction items at your chosen branch.

Happy Reading!

School Stress

 

Making Choices and Making Friends

Growing FriendshipsSometimes, as adults, we forget how stressful school can be for children and teens. We never want to see our children struggle with social skills, educational challenges, or other school-related stresses. In addition to asking for advice from your child’s teacher, the library also has some resources to help you and your kids learn how to develop the assets they need to succeed in school.

Some of these titles are only available at the Aurora Public Library, but we’re always happy to send items to the Dillsboro Public Library, if that is more convenient for you.

How to Do Homework Without Throwing Up    Speak Up and Get Along!   Stress Can Really Get on Your Nerves

True or False? Tests Stink!   Proud to be YouCliques, Phonies, and Other Baloney

Pens, Pencils, and Crayons!

As kids and teachers prepare to get back to the classroom, I’d like to recommend a group of picture books featuring witty and wise writing implements. In addition to just being fun books to read, I can also see these as great springboards to “What If?” questions. What if a school bus could tell stories? What if the chalkboard giggled every time a teacher wrote on it? What if your writing paper refused to sit still?

Have you ever wondered how your crayons feel about the things you color? Does the blue crayon enjoy being used down to a nub coloring all that sky? Who knew it was so hard to be only used at Halloween? The “Day the Crayons” books take you into the inner world of the crayon box!

The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt    The Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt

The Little Red Pen by award-winning author Janet Stevens is a story of the dramatic rescue of a pen from a wastebasket. In a clever twist on Little Red Riding Hood, Little Red Writing  is trying to write an exciting story, but has to face the ravenous pencil sharpener, the Wolf 3000.

The Little Red Pen by Janet Stevens    Little Red Writing by Joan Holub

All of these books celebrate creativity, empathy, and cooperation. Read a few with your children or students, and then put pencil to paper to create your own story and illustrations.

Making Friends is an Art! by Julia Cook     My Crayons Talk by Patricia Hubbard

The Pencil by Allan Ahlberg    Linus the Little Yellow Pencil by Scott Magoon

Stoker: The Name Lives On

Bram Stoker was an Irish writer known for Dracula, the classic 19th century horror novel. He was born in 1847 in Ireland.

His longtime role was acting as an assistant to the actor Sir Henry Irving in the 1870s. During that time he began his second and his most known career as a writer. He published his first novel, The Primrose Path, in 1875. Three years later, he published Dracula. Stoker died before the fictional vampire became popular through films and literary adaptations.

Dracula is the famous Gothic classic that is made from journal entries, letters, and telegrams written by the main characters. Many people theorize that Dracula is based on the Vlad III, also known as Vlad the Impaler. They theorize that Stoker picked the name Dracula after reading a book about Vlad that was revealed to him in translation from Romanian.

Stoker’s Dracula was the reason why vampires became so popular in films and novels alike. The story was received well when it was first published, but it grew to its immense popularity by the many adaptations that it inspired. Nosferatu was the first film to be based on Dracula in 1922, but actually plagiarized the story.

Because of Dracula, vampires have spread across the world and starred in modernized adaptations like Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga. Others have chosen to stick closer to Bram Stoker’s idea for vampires like Stephen King does in Salem’s Lot.

Dacre Stoker is the great grand nephew of Bram Stoker and has chosen to rework the idea of Dracula that his uncle had for the character by co-writing Dracula the Un-Dead as well as co-editing The Lost Journal of Bram Stoker: the Dublin Years. He currently manages the Bram Stoker Estate with his wife.

Because of all the controversy and the way adaptations were changing vampires, Dacre Stoker, decided to reawaken the story of Dracula with J.D. Barker. Dracul was inspired by notes left behind by Bram Stoker. It doesn’t only reveal Dracula’s origins but Bram Stoker’s as well!

 

We currently have both Dracula and Dracul on our shelves. Any other books by the author we could get through inter-library loan in Indiana.

Information taken from:

“Dracul By J.D. Barker, Dacre Stoker | Penguinrandomhouse.Com: Books”. Penguinrandomhouse.Com, 2019, https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/570086/dracul-by-jd-barker-and-dacre-stoker/.

“Dracula | Summary, Characters, & Facts”. Encyclopedia Britannica, 2019, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Dracula-novel#googDisableSync.

 

 

 

 

 

 

School & Library Connection

Are you a South Dearborn Community School Corporation Educator? If so, there are many ways the Aurora Public Library can assist you with your classroom.

We love to help with the obvious materials such as books and DVD’s.   However, there are many other services we can offer to you and your students.

 

If you are interested in learning more, we would love to see you at our “School and Library Connection” workshop at the Aurora Public Library on Wednesday July 31, 2019. at 9 am.  😊 Bring your device!  

  • During our program, we will walk you through the library’s website, focusing on requesting individual books, groups of books, and traveling book sets.

  • We will show you the many die cuts that we have available.  These die cuts can be used from everything from bulletin boards to crafts. You can bring your own paper and cut here at the library.  You can also check the die cuts out just like a book to cut at your school building if your building has a die cut machine.

  • We will introduce you to the many Online Resources we have available through the website – especially World Book.

  • We will show you how to use Overdrive on your devices and with the students. Students love Overdrive because they can use this directly from their school Chromebooks.

  • With advance notice we are also happy to bring a program to your classroom.

This is a free workshop for any K-12 Educator in the South Dearborn Community School district.

There will be coffee, muffins and donuts and there will be door prizes! 🙂

Coffee and Donuts

Please RSVP by sending an email to:  stephanie@eapld.org  by Wednesday, July 10

 

STEM Open House

STEM 2

The Aurora Public Library District will be having a STEM Open House for children ages 8-12 years old on Friday July 26, 2019

Join us at the Aurora Public Library from 10:30-12  or at the Dillsboro Public Library from 1:30-3:00 pm

LittleBits Electronic Building kit

 

Scratch Jr. App for iPad

 

What exactly is STEM?

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Makey Makey

Why is STEM important?

STEM boosts a child’s science literacy, helps improve a child’s critical thinking skills and helps students grasp a better understanding of math and science.  

Ozobots

 

At the STEM Open House children will use: Ozobots, Makey Makey, Scratch Jr on the iPad and build with the Little Bits Electronic Building Sets.  

No registration is required for this free event.  

 

Space Cakes!

Are you a teen who is interested in learning how to decorate cakes?  

   

The Aurora Public library will be having a cupcake decorating class on 

Thursday July 18, 2019 @ 6:00 pm

Teenagers age 13 and up are invited to decorate cupcakes.  Teens will work with piping bags and tips. They will learn how to work with fondant and edible glitter.  We will be decorating cupcakes in a space theme to go with our summer reading program.

This is a free class.  Supplies and space are limited so register early.  

Hope to see you there!  🙂

Imagination Generation: Songs That Build Creativity by David Kisor

As part of our “Family Fun Fridays” we will welcome Award -Winning Songwriter David Kisor to the library.  David Kisor will be bringing the Growing Sound music program “Imagination Generation” to the Aurora Public Library on Friday July 19, 2019 @10:30 am

“Imagination Generation” blends music, movement and creativity for a musical program that is “out of this world.”  Children will learn that their mind is both a toy and a tool. This music program focuses on three critical thinking skills: fluency, originality and adaptability.  

There is no registration required for this free event.  Children will receive a free music CD for attending.

Hope to see you there! 🙂