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Aurora Branch

Located at:
414 2nd St, Aurora, IN 47001

Phone:
(812) 926-0646

Hours:
Monday: 10 AM–6 PM
Tuesday: 10 AM–8 PM
Wednesday: 10 AM–6 PM
Thursday: 10 AM–8 PM
Friday: 10 AM–6 PM
Saturday: 10 AM–3 PM
Sunday: Closed

The Early Days

The Aurora Public Library got its start with the MaclureLibrary, which was a collection of books given to each county in Indiana in the late 1800s and became the foundation for the Aurora Public Library Association. The APL Association was housed in a local jewelry store.

In 1901, the Aurora Public Library Association folded into the Aurora Public Library with Alex B. Patterson, J. R. Houston, and J. A. Riddell conducting the first meeting of the Board of Library Directors at the store of James Riddell on Nov 1, 1901.  During this meeting they organized by electing president, secretary and treasurer. 

J R Houston was selected as a “committee” to confer with the State Librarian and Miss Hoagland, the State Library organizer, to explore modern methods of Library organization and classification.  Their efforts led to a public opening early in 1902.

Our Little Library

Georgiana Sutton was a well-known and respected woman of Aurora.  She was very intelligent and well-traveled.  She was a great lover of books and reading. Her father Dr. George Sutton was a famous medical doctor of his time who lived up on Sutton Hill.   Georgiana died on January 18, 1910, bequeathing $10,000 for a building be erected to house the library. Her brother, Dr. H. H. Sutton oversaw the project, dedicating it to the memory of her mother and father, Mrs. and Dr. George Sutton. 

In 1913, Dr. H. H. Sutton purchased the land at 414 Second Street called the Siemental Property in downtown Aurora.  He hired the architectural firm of Garber and Woodward from Cincinnati, Ohio, and the construction was set in motion.  

Though the Aurora Public Library building has the same general “look” of the Carnegie Libraries, it is one of a kind.  The small town of Aurora is very proud of their distinguished Library.  Being donated by such a respected woman of the town makes it truly unique.