Resources

Library Card Sign-Up Month

Do you have a library card with APLD yet? No? Well, why not! September is Library Card Sign-Up Month, so there’s no better time than the present! A library card with the Aurora Public Library District gives you access to books, audiobooks, movies, eBooks, and so much more! Stop by our Aurora or Dillsboro branch to sign up for a library card today!


Who Can Get a Card With Us?

Library cards are free to anyone who meets any of the following criteria:

  1. Anyone who resides in, or owns property in our district. This includes Caesar Creek, Center, Clay, Hogan, Manchester, Sparta, and Washington Townships in Dearborn County, Indiana.
  2. A member of the Lawrenceburg Public Library.
  3. A member of a home library that participates in the Indiana State Reciprocal Program.
  4. An Ivy Tech student presenting their current student ID.
  5. PLAC cards can be purchased for a fee by anyone living in Indiana who holds a library card from their home library.
  6. Don’t meet these criteria?  Don’t worry. You can purchase a paid membership with the Library for an annual fee.  APLD membership cards in 2020 cost $55.00 and are good for a calendar year.

How Do I Get a Card?

Getting a card is easy! Here’s how:

  1. Meet one of the criteria for membership listed above.
  2. Provide photo ID and proof of your current address. This can be any piece of mail, utility bill, lease agreement, or another official document which states your address and postmarked date. If your photo ID has your current address, that is all you need.
  3. Come see us at Aurora or Dillsboro with this information and fill out a membership form.*

*Patrons under the age of 18 will need a parent or guardian with them to sign their Library agreement for a full juvenile membership.  The patron must be able to print their name. The parent or guardian is responsible for materials checked out on this juvenile card.


What Can I Access With My Card?

Physical Materials

Your library card allows you to check out 10 books from each section of the library. That means you can check out 10 Adult Fiction, 10 Juvenile Fiction, 10 Easy Books, etc! That’s a lot of reading materials! We also have a collection of both adult and juvenile audiobooks if you’d rather listen. If you’re more into movies, we have an extensive collection of DVDs (about 4000!). Our selections include movies, TV series, documentaries, and foreign films. Our Dillsboro DVDs contain a number of unique titles! Your library card allows you to check out two DVDs at a time.

E-Materials

Your library card gives you access to over 60,000 eBooks, 8,000 eAudiobooks, 1,000 videos, and 1,000 magazines through the Indiana Digital Download Center. All you need is your library card number and a pin number on your account. Ask a staff member about adding a pin to your account. You can read and listen through the OverDrive or Libby app on your phone and other devices.

Online Resources

APLD has many online resources available for our patrons, including databases like A to Z World Travel, Consumer Reports, and Small Engine Repair; educational resources like AR Bookfinder and Tutor.com; reading resources like Novelist and eSequels; and online encyclopedias. These are all available on any computer with just your library card and pin number. We also have genealogy resources such as Ancestry and Heritage Quest. Due to licensing restrictions, access to Ancestry.com is only available from Library owned computers. You can find a complete list of our online resources here.

Local History Library

Do you need assistance with genealogy? Are you looking for a marriage certificate or obituary? Or are you just curious about the history of Aurora and the surrounding towns? Come see our staff members at the Local History Library at the Depot. The Local History Library gives you access to local newspapers on microfilm, yearbooks, cemetery records, Sanborn maps, Robinson’s City Directories, periodicals, and telephone directories.

Technology

APLD has public computers at both Aurora and Dillsboro branches for patron use. We do not currently offer wireless printing, but printing is available from our public computers. Prints are $.10 per page for black and white and $.50 per page for color.

Both branches have a portable scanner that can be used with our public computers.

Both branches have a public copy machine that costs $.10 per copy.

Services

Book Sale: We have an ongoing book sale in the basement of our Dillsboro branch! Come check it out!

Interlibrary Loan (ILL): ILL is a service that allows patrons of APLD to borrow books, DVDs, audiobooks, and music that are owned by another library system. To make an ILL request you must be a patron in good standing and have all the pertinent information on the material you are requesting. Fill out the Interlibrary Loan form here or ask any staff member to place a request for you.

Teacher’s Box of Books: Patrons with a teacher’s library card can request a box of books for their classroom! Just fill out the Teacher’s Box of Books form here and our Children’s Librarian will pick out fun books for your classroom!

Traveling Book Sets: Do you lead a library book discussion? Are you a teacher who needs a book for your entire class? Or maybe you’re just a regular person who hosts an informal gathering of friends each month to discuss the same book. If this describes you, then APLD can help! The Library District can supply your Reading Club, Class, or Group with multiple copies of the same title through our Traveling Book Sets Program. Just fill out the Traveling Book Set form here. The Library staff will send the books to local schools or public libraries. Individuals can pick up the books at either the Aurora or Dillsboro Library. See the list of available titles here.


Still have questions about getting a card? Check out our FAQ page, send us an email, or give us a call at 812-926-0646 (Aurora) or 812-954-4151 (Dillsboro).

 

 

Celebrating Women’s Suffrage

 

Arrests of Suffragists carrying purple, white and gold banners near the White House, August 6, 1918

August 26, 2020 marks the 100-year anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting women the right to vote. This right may be taken for granted today, but it was the result of decades of hard work, protests, and even jail sentences. Displays are in place at both the Aurora and the Dillsboro Public Libraries with books, quotations, and historical photographs. When looking for a book on the topic, don’t forget there are additional resources available to download through Overdrive or Libby.

    

In addition to our display, there are many wonderful resources online that illustrate the perseverance and sacrifices of the American suffragettes. Many of our national institutions have compiled special collections for this anniversary year, so check out these links for more information.

Women’s Vote Centennial Commission: https://www.womensvote100.org/learn

From the Smithsonian Institution: https://www.si.edu/spotlight/votes-for-women

From the Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/

From the National Archives: https://www.archives.gov/women/suffrage

From the National Park Service: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/womenshistory/19th-amendment.htm

 

Voter Registration 2020

The general election is coming up on November 3, 2020. Take the time today to register to vote, or to double check that your registration is up to date.

Do I Have the Right to Vote?

You have the right to vote in Indiana if:

  1. You are both a U.S. citizen and a resident of Indiana; and
  2. You will be at least 18 years of age on or before the next General or Municipal Election, and
  3. You are not currently in prison after being convicted of a crime; and
  4. You have lived in the precinct where you vote for at least 30 days prior to the election; and
  5. You are registered to vote.

How Do I Check if I’m Already Registered to Vote?

Check your voting status by:

  1. Visiting https://indianavoters.in.gov/
  2. Under “CHECK VOTING STATUS,” click on “Check Your Registration Record”
  3. Enter your first and last name and your birthday, and select your county from the drop down menu
  4. Click Submit
  5. If you are registered, you will be taken to your voter portal.
  6. If you are not registered, a pop up will appear saying “We could not find voter registration from the information you entered.” It will then give the option to register.

What’s a Voter Portal?

Your voter portal is your go to place for information on voting and upcoming elections. In your portal you can:

  1. Update your voter information if you’ve moved or changed your name
  2. Apply for an absentee ballot
  3. Check your polling location and hours
  4. See who is on your ballot

How Do I Register to Vote

There are three methods to register:

  1. Register online at http://www.indianavoters.com/ with a valid Indiana driver’s license or Indiana state-issued identification card on or before October 5, 2020
  2. Register by mail by completing this form and mailing it to the Dearborn County Election Clerk: 165 Mary Street Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 (forms must be postmarked on or before October 5, 2020)
  3. Register in person by returning the completed form to your county’s voter registration office or the Indiana Election Division on or before October 5, 2020

 

Once your voter registration application is received, your county voter registration office will process the application and determine your eligibility. If you are eligible, the county office will send you a voter registration acknowledgment card. Once you receive that card, you will be officially registered. If you are not eligible, or if the application was incomplete, you will receive a notice denying the application or requesting the missing information.

Over 4.5 million Indiana residents are registered to vote! Join them today!


All information taken from in.gov

Resources for Homeschoolers

We’ve always had quite a few homeschool families in the Library District. Recently we have taken steps to update our collection of resources to help those families. Many of these newer titles might be interesting to other parents as well, so click on these links to get more information. We also have items on display at both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library, including packets of information about some of our other educational resources.

  2 Homeschool Myths Debunked by Kent Larson  The Brave Learner by Julie Bogart  The Call of the Wild + Free by Ainsley Arment

 Homeschoolers are Not Hermits by Kathy Oaks  Homeschooled & Headed for College by Denise Boiko  Homeschooling Gifted Kids by Cindy West

 The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise  This is My Home, This is My School by Jonathan Bean  Unschooled by Kerry McDonald

As always, we’re happy to request items from other libraries, if we don’t have exactly what you need. Just talk to a staff member, or click here to request an item through Inter-Library Loan.

COVID-19 Information

Many of these resources are updated daily:

World Health Organization COVID-19 Resources

Center for Disease Control COVID-19 Resources

John Hopkins University: Coronavirus Resource Center

Information from the U.S. Government:

 The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America

Coronavirus Resources

Information from the State of Indiana:

Public Resources in other Languages

Indiana Department of Health

 Resources for the Public

Resources for Professionals

Press Releases from Governor Holcomb

Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb

Information from Dearborn County:

Dearborn County Emergency Proclamation – dated March 17, 2020

Dearborn County Department of Health

City of Aurora Updates:

 Emergency Declaration Extended until May 6

Emergency Assistance Resources

Emergency Response – March 17, 2020

Emergency Order – March 16, 2020

Local Area Closings

 

Staying At Home? Great Resources for Families – Updated 4/4

This post will be updated as more great online resources become available during this time of social distancing. These are all free for anyone to visit and use.

New on 4/4:

 

New on 3/30:

  •  Make a Mancala Board: Mancala is a wonderful game for all ages. You just need an egg carton and some dried beans, pennies, or beads, etc for the pieces.
  • Virtual programs from the Taft Museum of Art
  • Salt Dough decorations – Make Easter shapes, circles, hearts, or whatever you can cut out free-hand or with a cookie cutter.

 

New on 3/24: Teaching Books resources – free access through at least the middle of September.

NEW: Digital Escape Room for Harry Potter fans!

Scholastic.com is making great online resources available to families and teachers. Scholastic Learn at Home

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is doing a video visit with a zoo animal each weekday at 3 PM. Instructions for a related craft are also included. Watch these live on the Zoo’s facebook page  or archived at: http://cincinnatizoo.org/home-safari-resources/ 

Mo Willems, beloved author and illustrator of children’s book is hosting a daily (weekdays) broadcast called Lunch Doodles. This is your chance to draw along with Mo!

Here’s another daily opportunity for the artists in your family: Draw Every Day with Jarrett J. Krosoczka.

Flannel Board Fun is a wonderful blog that offers lots of opportunities for kids to learn through play, and no, it’s not just about flannelboards!

National Geographic for Kids has great activities you can access without a subscription.

Don’t forget that limited screen time is still recommended for kids of all ages! Go outside to play together, get out a board game, play cards, or cook together.

Please keep checking back; more activities will be added!

Check Out These Digital Resources! Updated 4/1

Some, but not all,  of these free resources require an Aurora Public Library Card and a PIN. If you have a library card, but get blocked because your card has expired or you have forgotten your PIN, send an email to contact@EAPLD.org. I will try to address your issue the next time I’m in the library building.

New on 4/1:

New on 3/24: Mid-America Books is giving free access to all their e-books and databases through June 2020.

 

New on 3/24: Teaching Books resources – free access through at least the middle of September.

NEW: TumbleBooks is making their database of ebooks available FREE to all Public Libraries through the end of August 2020. Just click on the link to read the book on a computer or other device. Library card and PIN are NOT required, so spread the word! A big thanks to the folks at TumbleBooks who made this available to community members who don’t currently have a library card!

 

 

K-6 children’s ebooks

K-6 math ebooks

Ebooks for grades 7-12

Audiobooks for all ages

Adult Romance books: Just so you know, Tumblebooks describe these as “Steamy Romance novels”

Indiana Digital Download Center: Free downloads of ebooks, audiobooks, movies, and magazines. Requires a valid Aurora Public Library District card and PIN. If you’ve used your library card recently, we’ve updated your expiration date to be good through the end of May 2020. If you have an expired card, send me a message at contact@eapld.org Let’s be kind to each other by remembering to return our digital items after we’ve read them! Remember the Magazines are simultaneous use, so never any waiting for one of the magazines!

Here’s a tutorial to get you started on digital downloads, if you’re new to this: Getting Started

These resources can be accessed through the Online Resources link of the Library’s web page:

Heritage Quest: This is a great way to begin looking at your family history and can be accessed remotely from a home computer or device. If you’re new to this, you may want to click on Research Aids at the top of the Heritage web page and then “Ancestry Anne’s Top 10 Search Tips” in the “Getting Started” box.

World Book Online and Britannica: Great resources for everyone, and you can select the resources appropriate to each age level.

Small Engine Repair: This is what you need when it’s grass-cutting season and you can’t get your lawn mower started! Also great for chain saws, motorcycles and other small power equipment.

A to Z USA: check this out for information on regional and ethnic foods, including recipes, agricultural products, and historical cookbooks.

Travel and Geographical information is available with these three resources:

    A To Z in the USA

     A to Z World Travel

     Global Road Warriors

We have grouped reliable health resources together under the heading Health and Medical Resources. This group of resources was collated through the work of the American Library Association.

Much, much more is available so scroll through all the resources at: https://eapld.org/online-resources/

 

National Hot Tea Month

Well, I’m inspired to drink a cup of tea now that I know January is National Hot Tea Month!

Turn on the kettle, drop in the tea leaves and settle into one of Laura Childs’ cozy Tea Shop mysteries. The long-running series began with Death by Darjeeling and Gunpowder Green and continues through Broken Bone China, published in 2019.

Death by Darjeeling by Laura Childs Gunpowder Green by Laura Childs Broken Bone China by Laura Childs

You’ll also want to check out The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes by Victoria magazine. The book includes information about serving tea, suggested menus and recipes, and charming tea passages from literary classics like Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Don’t forget that the library also has copies of Tea Time magazine to turn to for inspiration!

The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes   

For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose

 

 

 

Don’t worry if you’re more of a non-fiction reader! You can learn about how the English managed to smuggle tea out of China in For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose.

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure you include your children and grandchildren in a tea party this month, and share one of these children’s books with them.

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham

 

 

 

 

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham is a short chapter book with the delightful feel of a legend or fable.

 

 

 

 

Of course, there are also tea-themed books for the very youngest readers.

Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Fancy Nancy Tea Parties by Jane O'Connor

“Yes, that’s it!” said the Hatter with a sigh. “It’s always tea time.”

             – Lewis Carroll

Traditional Christmas Tales

 

The Aurora Public Library District has wonderful holiday stories to share with children of all ages, from The Night Before Christmas to newer books like Santa’s Story by Will Hillenbrand. When you’re choosing the stories you want to share or the stories you want to read, don’t forget to include some of these classic stories. They range from a few pages long to a story that will require several sittings to complete, but they are guaranteed to help you think about Christmas in a new way. Who knows? You might start a new holiday tradition with your family.

Before it was a ballet, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King was a story written by E.T.A. Hoffman. We have several retellings of this at the library, including ones illustrated by Maurice Sendak and Mary Englebreit. For adults, there is a Nutcracker origin tale written by Gregory Maguire, the author of Wicked.

Mary Engelbreit's Nutcracker    Hiddensee by Gregory Maguire

You probably know Pearl S. Buck as the author of the Pulitzer-winning novel The Good Earth. Did you know she also wrote a lovely Christmas short story called Christmas Day in the Morning? Another great read-aloud is The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomeya touching story of the power of kindness.

Christmas Day in the Morning by Pearl S. Buck  The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey

For many of us, Christmas is not complete without some version of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Read it, or perhaps watch the DVD. We have  the George C. Scott version as well as Disney and Muppet versions. Another Christmas classic is The Gift of the Magi, complete with O. Henry’s signature ironic twist.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens  The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Other books in the Library offer collections of holiday stories and poems. You can find tales by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Henry Van Dyke, Madeleine L’Engle, Lois Lenski, and others. You’re sure to enjoy old favorites and discover new timeless tales to brighten your holiday season.

Home for Christmas: Stories for Young and Old A Newbery Christmas A Christmas Treasury of Yuletide Stories & Poems