Resources

Election Day Information 2020

The 2020 General Election is on November 3rd! Do you have your voting plan in place? Now is the time to make sure that you have all the needed documentation, find your polling location and hours, and if needed, apply for a mail-in ballot. Here’s some helpful information to help you with your voting plan! You can also check out the resources at https://www.findlaw.com/voting/indiana-voting-guide.html

Voting Rights

The Constitution of the United States of America says that you have the right to take part in civic life.

  1. If you are registered to vote in Indiana, you have the right to vote in this election.
  2. You have the right to vote by yourself or with help and you can select who you want to assist you.
  3. Even if you have a conservator, you may vote unless a court specifically said you cannot.
  4. You have the right to vote the way you want.
  5. You have the right to get help if someone tries to stop you from voting.
  6. You have the right to be shown how to make your choices on your ballot.
  7. If you are waiting in line when the poll closes, you must be allowed to vote.

Dearborn County Polling Locations

Polling locations in Dearborn County will be open from 6 AM until 6 PM on Election Day. Registered voters may vote at any one of these ten locations. Locations will have all voter information and ballots for the entire county. Every polling location will have 4-6 sign-in lines and an average of 14 machines to vote on.

Dillsboro Civic Center

9824 Central Avenue

Dillsboro, IN 47018

First Baptist Church of Aurora

6060 Blair Dr.

Aurora, IN 47001

Agner Hall

145 Speedway Dr.

Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

Tanner Valley Methodist Church

19235 State Route One

Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

Willie’s in HVL

19325 Schmarr Dr.

Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

Dearborn Hills United Methodist Church

25365 Stateline Rd.

Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

St. John Catholic Church

25743 State Route One

Guilford, IN 47022

St. Martin Catholic Church

8044 Yorkridge Rd.

Guilford, IN 47022

Manchester Firehouse

7893 State Route 48

Aurora, IN 47001

Moores Hill Senior Center

16610 N. Broadway St.

Moores Hill, IN 47032


Accessibility at the Polls

  1. The site should have clearly marked, accessible parking.
  2. If the main entrance is not accessible, there must be a clearly marked accessible entrance.
  3. One must be able to enter the site without difficulty.
  4. The path from the entrance to the voting area should be level and clear of obstacles.
  5. At least one voting machine should be accessible to people with disabilities.
  6. Accommodations should be available to allow individuals with blindness or low vision to cast their vote privately.
  7. Wheelchair users or individuals who cannot stand for long periods of time should be accommodated to be allowed to sit while voting.
  8. If assistance is needed to vote, one must be allowed to designate a person to assist, provided that person is not your employer or union representative.

What to Bring to the Polls

Indiana law requires residents to present a government-issued photo identification before casting a ballot at the polls on Election Day. Your photo identification must meet all of the following four criteria to be acceptable for voting purposes:

  1. Display your photo; AND
  2. Display your name, and the name must conform to your voter registration record; AND
  3. Display an expiration date and either be current or have expired sometime after the date of the last General Election; AND
  4. Be issued by the State of Indiana or the U.S. government.

In most cases, an Indiana driver license, Indiana photo ID card, Military ID or U.S. Passport is sufficient.

If you are unable or unwilling to present ID meeting these requirements, you may cast a provisional ballot. If you cast a provisional ballot, you have until noon 10 days after the election to follow up with the county election board and either provide the necessary documentation or affirm one of the law’s exemptions applies to you.


New Voting Machines

Dearborn County has purchased new voting machines and adopted a new way of voting on election day. Voting will be done electronically on these new machines. You can visit the Dearborn County Elections page for instructional videos on the new machines.


Absentee Voting

Can’t make it the polls on November 3rd? No problem! Indiana has three methods of absentee voting available to its residents: in-person early voting, absentee voting by mail, and absentee voting by travel board. You can learn more about absentee voting and how to apply here.

 

 

Indiana Absentee Ballot 2020

The General Election is coming up! If you can’t make it to the polls on November 3rd, you can vote absentee in one of three ways.

In-Person Absentee Voting

State law requires counties to make in-person absentee voting available for 28-days before the election, ending at noon (local prevailing time), the date before the election. In addition, all Indiana counties must make in-person absentee voting available the two Saturdays immediately before the election. County officials will have applications or electronic Poll Books at early voting locations so there is no need to file an ABS-In Person application before your visit.

Dearborn County Early Voting Locations & Hours

Bright Fire House

Open Saturday, October 24th from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM

Dillsboro Civic Center

Open Saturday, October 24th from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM

Dearborn County Clerk’s Office Administration Building

Open Tuesday, October 6th through Friday, October 30th from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

and Saturday, October 24th from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

and Monday, November 2nd from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM


Absentee Voting by Mail

Qualifications

To vote absentee-by-mail in Indiana, a voter must be able to personally mark their own ballot and sign their name to the completed ballot security envelope and have a reason to request an absentee vote-by-mail ballot:

  1. You have a specific, reasonable expectation that you will be absent from the county on Election Day during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open (6 am until 6 pm).
  2. You have a disability.
  3. You are at least 65 years of age.
  4. You will have official election duties outside of your voting precinct.
  5. You are scheduled to work at your regular place of employment during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open.
  6. You will be confined due to illness or injury or you will be caring for an individual confined due to illness or injury during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open.
  7. You are prevented from voting because of a religious discipline or religious holiday during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open.
  8. You are a participant in the state’s address confidentiality program.
  9. You are a member of the military or a public safety officer.
  10. You are a “serious sex offender” as defined in Indiana Code 35-42-4-14(a).
  11. You are prevented from voting due to the unavailability of transportation to the polls.

How to Apply for a Vote-by-Mail Ballot

To vote absentee by mail, a voter must first complete an ABS-Mail application before each election. The application to request a vote-by-mail ballot must be received not later than 11:59 PM on October 22, 2020 for the November election. The county or the state must have the application in their possession by this deadline; any application received after this deadline – even if it’s postmarked before the deadline – cannot be processed.

To get the ABS-Mail application, voters can:

  1. Download and print the form
  2. Call their county election official or the Indiana Election Division at (317) 232-3939 for an application to be mailed
  3. Visit their county election office or election division to pick-up an application in-person

Voters can turn in their application:

  1. Online at indianavoters.com by logging in to their “my voter portal page” by entering the requested information exactly as it appears on their voter registration record. When on the main landing page, the voter selects the “ABS-Mail” option and enters the information as prompted. After clicking “submit,” a confirmation screen appears that allows the voter to download and retain a copy for their records. There is no need to sign and return the online submission since the system applies the voter’s registration signature to the application on the back-end.
  2. By mail or hand-delivery. Physical addresses to the county election boards are found on the back of the ABS-Mail application. Please contact their office directly to determine office hours. Remember, if you take custody of another’s absentee ballot application, you are to deliver it to the election official not later than noon, ten (10) days after receiving it OR the application deadline, whichever comes first.
  3. By email. This requires the voter to print, sign, and scan or photograph their absentee ballot application and send it to the county official or the Indiana Election Division at elections@iec.in.gov.

A voter with disabilities may request that another person sign the voter’s name on their behalf on the application. The person providing the assistance may not be the voter’s employer or union representative and must complete the affidavit of assistance found on the application. If the assistor is the voter’s power of attorney (POA), the POA paperwork should be submitted with the application.

Returning your Absentee-By-Mail Ballot

If your application is reviewed and approved by bi-partisan county election officials, a ballot packet is mailed to you. This packet will include your ballot, the absentee voter bill of rights, and a first class postage pre-paid return security envelope.

The voter must be able to personally mark their own ballot but may have assistance with placing the ballot inside the envelope and sealing it. (Be sure the assistor completes the affidavit of assistance!) The voter should sign the ballot (or make their mark) on the signature line. A voter’s power of attorney (POA) may attest to the voter’s signature but is to enclose their POA with the ballot materials inside the security envelope and complete the affidavit found on the absentee return envelope.

County election officials must receive an absentee-by-mail ballot not later than noon (local prevailing time) on Election Day, November 3, 2020. County election officials must have possession of the ballot by this deadline; postmarks – even if dated on or before the date of the election – cannot be considered timely.

Finally, pursuant to state law, only the voter, the voter’s attorney-in-fact, a bonded courier, or a member of the voter’s immediate household may hand-deliver a completed absentee ballot to the county election board. Any person other than the voter doing so is to complete the ABS-19 affidavit.


Travel Board

Qualifications

Absentee voting by travel board is an option for some voters to have a bi-partisan team deliver the voter’s ballot and assist the person with completing their ballot during the 19-day period before the election. In order to vote absentee-by-traveling board, one of the following must apply:

  1. The voter expects to be confined, due to illness or injury, or the voter expects to be caring for a confined person at a private residence, on Election Day.
  2. The voter is a voter with disabilities and believes their polling place is not accessible to them.
  3. The voter is physically unable to complete the ballot and sign the affidavit on their own.

How to Apply to Vote by Travel Board

Voters voting by traveling board must complete an ABS-Traveling Board application before each election. The application to request a travel board must be received not later than noon (local prevailing time) on November 2, 2020.

To get the Travel Board application, voters can:

  1. Download and print the form
  2. Call their county election official or the Indiana Election Division at (317) 232-3939 for an application to be mailed
  3. Visit their county election office or election division to pick-up an application in -person

Voters can turn in their applications:

  1. Online at indianavoters.com by logging in to their “my voter portal page” by entering the requested information exactly as it appears on their voter registration record. When on the main landing page, the voter selects the “ABS-Traveling Board” option and enters the information as prompted. After clicking “submit,” a confirmation screen appears that allows the voter to download and retain a copy for their records. There is no need to sign and return the online submission since the system automatically applies the voter’s registration signature to the application.
  2. By mail or hand-delivery. Physical addresses for the county election boards are found on the back of the ABS-Mail application. Please contact their office directly to determine office hours. And remember, if you take custody of another’s absentee ballot application, you are to deliver it to the election official not later than noon, ten (10) days after receiving it OR the application deadline, whichever comes first.
  3. By email. This requires the voter to print, sign, and scan or photograph their absentee ballot application and send it to the county official or the Indiana Election Division at elections@indy.gov.

Please include a phone number or email address on the traveling board application! County officials must be able to contact the voter to schedule a mutually agreeable time for the bi-partisan team to deliver the ballot to the voter and provide assistance, when requested. Including a way to contact the individual in the most efficient manner is helpful to everyone.


 

Celebrating Women’s Suffrage

 

Arrests of Suffragists carrying purple, white and gold banners near the White House, August 6, 1918

August 26, 2020 marks the 100-year anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting women the right to vote. This right may be taken for granted today, but it was the result of decades of hard work, protests, and even jail sentences. Displays are in place at both the Aurora and the Dillsboro Public Libraries with books, quotations, and historical photographs. When looking for a book on the topic, don’t forget there are additional resources available to download through Overdrive or Libby.

    

In addition to our display, there are many wonderful resources online that illustrate the perseverance and sacrifices of the American suffragettes. Many of our national institutions have compiled special collections for this anniversary year, so check out these links for more information.

Women’s Vote Centennial Commission: https://www.womensvote100.org/learn

From the Smithsonian Institution: https://www.si.edu/spotlight/votes-for-women

From the Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/

From the National Archives: https://www.archives.gov/women/suffrage

From the National Park Service: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/womenshistory/19th-amendment.htm

 

Voter Registration 2020

The general election is coming up on November 3, 2020. Take the time today to register to vote, or to double check that your registration is up to date.

Do I Have the Right to Vote?

You have the right to vote in Indiana if:

  1. You are both a U.S. citizen and a resident of Indiana; and
  2. You will be at least 18 years of age on or before the next General or Municipal Election, and
  3. You are not currently in prison after being convicted of a crime; and
  4. You have lived in the precinct where you vote for at least 30 days prior to the election; and
  5. You are registered to vote.

How Do I Check if I’m Already Registered to Vote?

Check your voting status by:

  1. Visiting https://indianavoters.in.gov/
  2. Under “CHECK VOTING STATUS,” click on “Check Your Registration Record”
  3. Enter your first and last name and your birthday, and select your county from the drop down menu
  4. Click Submit
  5. If you are registered, you will be taken to your voter portal.
  6. If you are not registered, a pop up will appear saying “We could not find voter registration from the information you entered.” It will then give the option to register.

What’s a Voter Portal?

Your voter portal is your go to place for information on voting and upcoming elections. In your portal you can:

  1. Update your voter information if you’ve moved or changed your name
  2. Apply for an absentee ballot
  3. Check your polling location and hours
  4. See who is on your ballot

How Do I Register to Vote

There are three methods to register:

  1. Register online at http://www.indianavoters.com/ with a valid Indiana driver’s license or Indiana state-issued identification card on or before October 5, 2020
  2. Register by mail by completing this form and mailing it to the Dearborn County Election Clerk: 165 Mary Street Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 (forms must be postmarked on or before October 5, 2020)
  3. Register in person by returning the completed form to your county’s voter registration office or the Indiana Election Division on or before October 5, 2020

 

Once your voter registration application is received, your county voter registration office will process the application and determine your eligibility. If you are eligible, the county office will send you a voter registration acknowledgment card. Once you receive that card, you will be officially registered. If you are not eligible, or if the application was incomplete, you will receive a notice denying the application or requesting the missing information.

Over 4.5 million Indiana residents are registered to vote! Join them today!


All information taken from in.gov

Resources for Homeschoolers

We’ve always had quite a few homeschool families in the Library District. Recently we have taken steps to update our collection of resources to help those families. Many of these newer titles might be interesting to other parents as well, so click on these links to get more information. We also have items on display at both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library, including packets of information about some of our other educational resources.

  2 Homeschool Myths Debunked by Kent Larson  The Brave Learner by Julie Bogart  The Call of the Wild + Free by Ainsley Arment

 Homeschoolers are Not Hermits by Kathy Oaks  Homeschooled & Headed for College by Denise Boiko  Homeschooling Gifted Kids by Cindy West

 The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise  This is My Home, This is My School by Jonathan Bean  Unschooled by Kerry McDonald

As always, we’re happy to request items from other libraries, if we don’t have exactly what you need. Just talk to a staff member, or click here to request an item through Inter-Library Loan.

COVID-19 Information

Many of these resources are updated daily:

World Health Organization COVID-19 Resources

Center for Disease Control COVID-19 Resources

John Hopkins University: Coronavirus Resource Center

Information from the U.S. Government:

 The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America

Coronavirus Resources

Information from the State of Indiana:

Public Resources in other Languages

Indiana Department of Health

 Resources for the Public

Resources for Professionals

Press Releases from Governor Holcomb

Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb

Information from Dearborn County:

Dearborn County Emergency Proclamation – dated March 17, 2020

Dearborn County Department of Health

City of Aurora Updates:

 Emergency Declaration Extended until May 6

Emergency Assistance Resources

Emergency Response – March 17, 2020

Emergency Order – March 16, 2020

Local Area Closings

 

Staying At Home? Great Resources for Families – Updated 4/4

This post will be updated as more great online resources become available during this time of social distancing. These are all free for anyone to visit and use.

New on 4/4:

 

New on 3/30:

  •  Make a Mancala Board: Mancala is a wonderful game for all ages. You just need an egg carton and some dried beans, pennies, or beads, etc for the pieces.
  • Virtual programs from the Taft Museum of Art
  • Salt Dough decorations – Make Easter shapes, circles, hearts, or whatever you can cut out free-hand or with a cookie cutter.

 

New on 3/24: Teaching Books resources – free access through at least the middle of September.

NEW: Digital Escape Room for Harry Potter fans!

Scholastic.com is making great online resources available to families and teachers. Scholastic Learn at Home

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is doing a video visit with a zoo animal each weekday at 3 PM. Instructions for a related craft are also included. Watch these live on the Zoo’s facebook page  or archived at: http://cincinnatizoo.org/home-safari-resources/ 

Mo Willems, beloved author and illustrator of children’s book is hosting a daily (weekdays) broadcast called Lunch Doodles. This is your chance to draw along with Mo!

Here’s another daily opportunity for the artists in your family: Draw Every Day with Jarrett J. Krosoczka.

Flannel Board Fun is a wonderful blog that offers lots of opportunities for kids to learn through play, and no, it’s not just about flannelboards!

National Geographic for Kids has great activities you can access without a subscription.

Don’t forget that limited screen time is still recommended for kids of all ages! Go outside to play together, get out a board game, play cards, or cook together.

Please keep checking back; more activities will be added!

Check Out These Digital Resources! Updated 4/1

Some, but not all,  of these free resources require an Aurora Public Library Card and a PIN. If you have a library card, but get blocked because your card has expired or you have forgotten your PIN, send an email to contact@EAPLD.org. I will try to address your issue the next time I’m in the library building.

New on 4/1:

New on 3/24: Mid-America Books is giving free access to all their e-books and databases through June 2020.

 

New on 3/24: Teaching Books resources – free access through at least the middle of September.

NEW: TumbleBooks is making their database of ebooks available FREE to all Public Libraries through the end of August 2020. Just click on the link to read the book on a computer or other device. Library card and PIN are NOT required, so spread the word! A big thanks to the folks at TumbleBooks who made this available to community members who don’t currently have a library card!

 

 

K-6 children’s ebooks

K-6 math ebooks

Ebooks for grades 7-12

Audiobooks for all ages

Adult Romance books: Just so you know, Tumblebooks describe these as “Steamy Romance novels”

Indiana Digital Download Center: Free downloads of ebooks, audiobooks, movies, and magazines. Requires a valid Aurora Public Library District card and PIN. If you’ve used your library card recently, we’ve updated your expiration date to be good through the end of May 2020. If you have an expired card, send me a message at contact@eapld.org Let’s be kind to each other by remembering to return our digital items after we’ve read them! Remember the Magazines are simultaneous use, so never any waiting for one of the magazines!

Here’s a tutorial to get you started on digital downloads, if you’re new to this: Getting Started

These resources can be accessed through the Online Resources link of the Library’s web page:

Heritage Quest: This is a great way to begin looking at your family history and can be accessed remotely from a home computer or device. If you’re new to this, you may want to click on Research Aids at the top of the Heritage web page and then “Ancestry Anne’s Top 10 Search Tips” in the “Getting Started” box.

World Book Online and Britannica: Great resources for everyone, and you can select the resources appropriate to each age level.

Small Engine Repair: This is what you need when it’s grass-cutting season and you can’t get your lawn mower started! Also great for chain saws, motorcycles and other small power equipment.

A to Z USA: check this out for information on regional and ethnic foods, including recipes, agricultural products, and historical cookbooks.

Travel and Geographical information is available with these three resources:

    A To Z in the USA

     A to Z World Travel

     Global Road Warriors

We have grouped reliable health resources together under the heading Health and Medical Resources. This group of resources was collated through the work of the American Library Association.

Much, much more is available so scroll through all the resources at: https://eapld.org/online-resources/

 

National Hot Tea Month

Well, I’m inspired to drink a cup of tea now that I know January is National Hot Tea Month!

Turn on the kettle, drop in the tea leaves and settle into one of Laura Childs’ cozy Tea Shop mysteries. The long-running series began with Death by Darjeeling and Gunpowder Green and continues through Broken Bone China, published in 2019.

Death by Darjeeling by Laura Childs Gunpowder Green by Laura Childs Broken Bone China by Laura Childs

You’ll also want to check out The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes by Victoria magazine. The book includes information about serving tea, suggested menus and recipes, and charming tea passages from literary classics like Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Don’t forget that the library also has copies of Tea Time magazine to turn to for inspiration!

The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes   

For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose

 

 

 

Don’t worry if you’re more of a non-fiction reader! You can learn about how the English managed to smuggle tea out of China in For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose.

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure you include your children and grandchildren in a tea party this month, and share one of these children’s books with them.

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham

 

 

 

 

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham is a short chapter book with the delightful feel of a legend or fable.

 

 

 

 

Of course, there are also tea-themed books for the very youngest readers.

Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Fancy Nancy Tea Parties by Jane O'Connor

“Yes, that’s it!” said the Hatter with a sigh. “It’s always tea time.”

             – Lewis Carroll

Traditional Christmas Tales

 

The Aurora Public Library District has wonderful holiday stories to share with children of all ages, from The Night Before Christmas to newer books like Santa’s Story by Will Hillenbrand. When you’re choosing the stories you want to share or the stories you want to read, don’t forget to include some of these classic stories. They range from a few pages long to a story that will require several sittings to complete, but they are guaranteed to help you think about Christmas in a new way. Who knows? You might start a new holiday tradition with your family.

Before it was a ballet, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King was a story written by E.T.A. Hoffman. We have several retellings of this at the library, including ones illustrated by Maurice Sendak and Mary Englebreit. For adults, there is a Nutcracker origin tale written by Gregory Maguire, the author of Wicked.

Mary Engelbreit's Nutcracker    Hiddensee by Gregory Maguire

You probably know Pearl S. Buck as the author of the Pulitzer-winning novel The Good Earth. Did you know she also wrote a lovely Christmas short story called Christmas Day in the Morning? Another great read-aloud is The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomeya touching story of the power of kindness.

Christmas Day in the Morning by Pearl S. Buck  The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey

For many of us, Christmas is not complete without some version of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Read it, or perhaps watch the DVD. We have  the George C. Scott version as well as Disney and Muppet versions. Another Christmas classic is The Gift of the Magi, complete with O. Henry’s signature ironic twist.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens  The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Other books in the Library offer collections of holiday stories and poems. You can find tales by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Henry Van Dyke, Madeleine L’Engle, Lois Lenski, and others. You’re sure to enjoy old favorites and discover new timeless tales to brighten your holiday season.

Home for Christmas: Stories for Young and Old A Newbery Christmas A Christmas Treasury of Yuletide Stories & Poems