Resources

Awesome Audiobooks

You probably already know that you can download digital titles right to your smartphone or tablet with OverDrive, but did you know about the extensive audiobook collection available for download on the Indiana Digital Download Center? One of my favorite things to do is to download audiobooks right to my phone so I can listen to them while I’m driving or working around the house; it’s so convenient to have books right on my phone, which I already take with me everywhere anyway.

If you’re new to OverDrive and aren’t sure where to start, please stop by one of the branches in the Aurora Public Library District or give one of them a call so we can walk you through the process. The first thing you’ll need to set up with your account is a pin number, which you might already have. This number is what you type in when you renew your books online. If you aren’t sure if you have a pin — or if you’ve forgotten it — a staff member can set up a new one for you in seconds.

Whatever you’re in the mood for, OverDrive has it. You can search by title, author, genre, new releases, and titles available now. I really enjoy listening to memoirs because they are usually read by the author.

If you’d rather listen to audiobooks on CD, we also have a large collection of those for you to check out as well. At the Aurora branch, the audiobooks on CD have recently moved upstairs into what was formerly the Paperback Room when paperback fiction books were integrated into the regular fiction collection. You can browse the selection by stopping by either the Aurora or Dillsboro branches, or by searching our catalog online. If there’s an audiobook we don’t have that you’d like to listen to, you can always put a request in through Interlibrary Loan.

If you aren’t sure what audiobook to try first, I recommend listening to a book you’ve already read. That way, you know what happens already so if you find yourself zoning out, you won’t be missing anything. Many library patrons read the book and listen to the audiobook simultaneously, which can be helpful for you to be able to flip back and forth if you do miss or forget something. You can be immersed in the story wherever you go when you just can’t put the book down.

It seems like people either really love listening to audiobooks or they really hate it. I think that anyone can love an audiobook if they have an awesome narrator. Even if you don’t think you’ll like listening to someone read to you, or you’ve tried audiobooks before and can’t seem to get into them, I encourage you to try just one more time. Ask any of the staff at the Aurora Public Library District for recommendations! We’d be happy to help!

Happy Listening!

Live Homework Help

Are you or your child struggling with homework this new school year? Tutors can be pretty pricey and it can be hard to work around yours or your child’s busy schedules. Maybe you or your child is struggling with a new section, or need help studying for a test. The Aurora Public Library District can help!

We have lots of Online Resources available to you on our website, and one of the best is a link to Live Homework Help. Live Homework Help is a free tool that you can use to connect yourself or your child with a live tutor, helping you understand your homework in real time. Tutors are available from 2 p.m. to midnight every day and are absolutely free.

You don’t need to create an account to receive access to homework help from a live person, but you can create one to have access to other areas of the Live Homework Help website, like getting help with papers, taking practice quizzes and worksheets, practice taking the SAT, ACT, and other placement tests, and career and job resources.

Definitely take advantage of this free service offered to you through the Aurora Public Library District and Live Homework Help. If only this had been around when I was in school; I might have saved myself a few tears from all of my math classes!

Good luck!

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

It’s time we talk about this very serious matter of Suicide and learn ways to prevent it and to be aware of it. This isn’t a topic taken lightly and isn’t a topic to be joked about, Suicide is the real deal and we need to be aware of it. It’s the 10th leading cause of death.

Every year 44, 965 Americans die by suicide. That’s roughly 123 suicides per day. For every suicide, 25 people fail. It’s difficult to understand what drives so many individuals to take their own life.

What leads to suicide?

There isn’t a single answer. Suicides often happen when stress and health issues collide and create the feeling of hopelessness and despair. Depression is most common associated with suicide, and is often untreated. When conditions such as depression, anxiety and substance problems increase risk of suicide.

What are the warning signs?

A suicidal person may have a change in behavior or presence that it entirely new. This is important if the new or different behavior is related to an event, loss, or even change. Many people who take their lives exhibit one or more of the warning signs.

TALK:

If a person talks about:

  • Killing themselves.
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Having no reason to live
  • Being a burden to others
  • Feeling trapped
  • Unbearable pain.

BEHAVIOR:

If a person begins exhibiting these behaviors:

  • increased use of alcohol or drugs
  • looking for a way to end their lives, either writing about it or searching for methods online
  • withdrawing from their activities
  • isolating themselves from family and friends
  • sleeping too much or not enough
  • visiting or calling people to say goodbye
  • giving away prized possessions
  • agression
  • fatigue

Mood:

People who are contemplating suicide display many of the following moods:

  • depression
  • anxiety
  • loss of interest
  • irritability
  • humiliation
  • shame
  • agitation
  • anger
  • relief
  • sudden improvement

Common Misconceptions about Suicide:

Myth: People who talk about suicide won’t really do it.
Fact: Mostly everyone who attempts suicide has given some clue or warning.
Myth:Talking about suicide may give someone the idea.
Fact: You don’t give a suicidal person morbid ideas by talking about suicide. By bringing up the subject of suicide and discussing it, you can help prevent suicide.

 

PREVENTION:

If you see any warning signs in someone you care about. It’s okay to feel uncomfortable to bring up the topic, but ask anyways. You can’t make someone suicidal by showing you care. If you give them the opportunity to express their feelings, it can help them with their loneliness and negative feelings.

If someone you know is suicidal, be empathetic, and lend a listening ear. Let the person know that they are not alone and that you care. Don’t take the responsibility of making a person well, you can’t get better for a suicidal person, they have to make that commitment themselves. It takes courage to help someone who is suicidal.

 

TIPS FOR TALKING TO A SUICIDAL PERSON:

  • Be yourself. Let the person know that you care and they aren’t alone.
  • Listen. Let them vent. No matter how negative the conversation gets, the fact that they are talking is a positive.
  • Be sympathetic. Don’t judge. They are doing what they can do by talking to you.
  • Offer hope. Reassure the person that help is available and the feelings are temporary. Let them know their life is important to you.
  • Take them seriously. You aren’t putting thoughts in their head if you ask questions, you are showing that you are worried and that you take them seriously, that it’s okay for them to share their pain with you.
  • Don’t argue with them, act shocked, or promise confidentiality, a life is at stake. Don’t offer ways to fix their problems or blame yourself. You can’t fix someone.

Suicide is a serious issue and needs to be addressed and prevented. Mental Health is important. If a person is feeling depressed or anxious, get them help. Mental Health isn’t a myth and needs to be taken just as serious as any other disease. It isn’t a switch someone can turn on and off, depression and anxiety, any mental illness is a state of being. You can’t turn off your emotions like you can the lights in your house.

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, please call 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-2433) or 1-800-273-Talk (1-800-273-8255) or text HOME to 741741.

 

Please, don’t be afraid to call or ask for help.

Books about suicide or depression:

Coming Clean

This Song Will Save Your Life

I Was Here

How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me

Touched by Suicide: Hope and Healing After Loss

Straight Talk about Teenage Suicide

 

 

 

 

Resources:

http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/suicide

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention.htm

https://afsp.org/about-suicide/suicide-statistics/

 

Magazines to help you do stuff!

 

The library offers so much more than recreational reading material. We have lots of resources to help you get stuff done, and have fun! Whether you like to hike, fish, garden, tinker or go antiquing we have what you need to  make the most of everything you do.

Sky & TelescopeThe complete resource for amateur astronomers for over 70 years, Sky & Telescope provides readers with information on observing the sky, offering reviews and buyer’s guide information on the latest products as well as tips, how-to’s and much more.

Field & Stream – America’s Number One sportsman’s magazine, featuring in-depth articles on hunting, fishing, outdoor adventure, and conservation news. First-class fiction, and more. Field & Stream, editorial excellence for over 100 years.

Motor Trend – America’s automotive authority filled with road tests, service features, forecasts and racing news. A guide new-car buyers & enthusiasts trust most! An import and export automotive authority.

Popular Mechanics – Popular Mechanics is for people who have a passion to know how things work. It’s about how the latest advances in science and technology will impact your home, your car, consumer electronics, computers, even your health. Popular Mechanics – answers for curious minds.

Backwoods Home – Backwoods Home Magazine is written for people who have a desire to pursue personal independence, self-sufficiency, and their dreams. We offer “how-to” articles on owner-built housing, independent energy, gardening, health, self-employment, country living, and other topics related to an independent and self-reliant lifestyle.

Family Handyman – The #1 magazine for Do-it-yourself homeowners. Step-by-step maintenance, repair and improvement projects, plus tool skills, DIY tips, and product buying advice. Lots of great ideas on storage, weekend projects, improving your yard, woodworking, and décor. Cut the cost of owning a home and enjoy the satisfaction of doing it yourself!

Antiques – The Magazine Antiques brings you the fascinating worlds of architecture, interior design, and fine and decorative artsfrom the dawn of civilization to the modern era.You’ll learn about private collections and museums around the world that highlight the latest trends in collecting and decorating with antiques.

Backpacker – Magazine of wilderness travel offering practical “you can do it–here’s how” advice to enjoy every trip. Filled with the best places, gear and information for all kinds of hiking and camping trips with fold-out maps and stunning color photography.

Bicycling –  Since 1962, bicycling has been inspiring people to get more out of their cycling passion. Each action-packed issue is filled with proven secrets to go faster, stronger, longer. Increase your stamina; buy the best gear for your money; locate a great ride; improve your performance; perfect your technique; fuel your passion.

The list of great resources goes on and on. Stop by and see if we have what you you need.

Social Media: Follow Us!

Did you know that the Aurora Public Library District is on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram? These social media sites are just another way for you to connect to us! At the top right-hand corner of the Library website, you can click the images to find our accounts, but you can also:

 

At the top of the screen, search “Aurora Public Library District.” Be sure to Like and Follow us, too!

 

Our handle is “@auroralibrary.” Be sure to give us a Follow and Tweet and Retweet us, too!

 

Search “auroralibrary” to find us and give us a Follow! Tag us in the books you’re reading, the DVD’s you’re watching, and the audiobooks you’re listening to!

 

If you’re unsure if the account is ours or not, just search for our logo. We’d love for you to check in, tag us, send us messages, and more! Keep the Aurora Public Library District connected to you wherever you go!

As always, Happy Reading!

National Read an E-Book Week

I know it seems like there are holidays celebrating everything under the sun, but, to me, that means there’s always an excuse for a party and cake!

March 4-10 is National Read an E-Book Week, and the Indiana Digital Download Center has everything you’re looking for and more! What better way to celebrate than by holing yourself up in the comfort of your own home and plowing through as many e-books as you can throughout the week?

Sometimes you don’t want to leave the house; you don’t want to make yourself look presentable, put on real pants, and drive to the library. I get it. All of the staff at the Aurora Public Library District get it. It doesn’t offend us at all! But sometimes you need a book to read, and you need it now.

If you have a smartphone, computer, e-Reader, or tablet (like an iPad, or something like it), you can download the free app OverDrive right to your device. While you’re downloading apps to your device, you might as well find the free Kindle reading app, too; many books available through OverDrive and the Indiana Digital Download Center are formatted for the Kindle, so having the reading app makes it easier for you to download books to your device without you having to continually read in your browser, which eats up your data or can deter you from reading at all, if you don’t have WiFi.

Once your app is downloaded, you’ll be able to find us under the Aurora Public Library District. It is important that you select this option. Next, you’ll type in your library card number located on the back of your library card, and your pin number. Your pin number is a four-digit number that you would have set up when you applied for a library card. If you’re unsure as to what your pin number is, or if you believe you never set one up, just give us a call or stop in. We can’t see what you set your pin number from our screens, but we can reset it for you.

Then, you’re ready to browse! Browse the collection by what’s available now, search for specific titles, and even browse specific reading levels, like teen, children, and mature adult. When you’ve made a selection, just click to borrow the title or put it on hold. You can download the title as a PDF to your computer to transfer to your other devices, read from your Internet browser, or download the title directly to your device with the Kindle reading app or as an ePub with iBooks. In your settings, you can customize your lending period for 7, 14, or 21 days. The best part about that? After your lending period is up, the title automatically disappears, which means no late fees!

Despite the convenience offered to you with OverDrive, this process can be a little confusing. If you get stuck, please feel free to give the library a call and we can walk you through the process. Or stop in and bring your device and we’ll go through each step together. We would love to help you!

Happy Reading!

What Scientists Do

Do you have a child or teen who seems fascinated by all things science related? Or maybe you are the one in your family who loves to read about the work of scientists. “Scientists in the Field” is a wonderful book series that explores that actual scientific research being done by modern-day scientists around the world. Each book in the series features a particular research focus: insects, under-sea volcanoes, bees, whales, conservation, gorillas, and many more topics. The books have been consistently praised by reviewers from School Library Journal and have won numerous awards including the Robert F. Siebert Award for Kakapo Rescue: Saving the World’s Strangest Parrot.

Kakapo Rescue by Sy Montgomery

These books are great for learning about the actual subject being studied, but the real strength of the books is the ability to place the reader at the very center of the research process. These are very much focused on the application of the scientific method. As readers, we get to see the problems, the set-backs, and the refining of the research. We also get to see how different people with different careers all work together in the research field!

Here are a few of the books that illustrate the wide variety of scientific fields covered.

Eruption!: Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Lives by Elizabeth Rusch   Stronger than Steel by Bridget Heos

The Mighty Mars Rovers by Elizabeth Rusch   Amazon Adventure: How Tiny Fish are Savingthe World's Largest Rainforest by Sy Montgomery

A few of the titles will be of special interest to people in our geographic area. Dr. Terri Roth from the Cincinnati Zoo is featured in Emi and the Rhino Scientist. Dr. Roth is the director of the Cincinnati Zoo’s research on endangered animal species, including the extremely rare Sumatran rhino.  The Bug Scientists features Tom Turpin a long-time professor of entomology at Purdue University. Turpin, who retired in 2017, spent 45 years making the study of insects seem cool at events like Purdue’s annual Bug Bowl.

  The Bug Scientists by Donna M. Jackson

Several of the books in the “Scientists in the Field” series are written by Cincinnati author Mary Kay Carson.

Inside Biosphere 2: Earth Science Under Glass by Mary Kay Carson  The Park Scientists by Mary Kay Carson

Our latest addition in this book series is Life on Surtsey: Iceland’s Upstart Island, a fascinating look at the way plant and animal life is developing on a volcanic island that was formed in 1963.

Life on Surtsey by Loree Griffin Burns

Fascinating stuff, wouldn’t you say? Stop by to check out one of these amazing books!

 

 

Where Are They Going?

The days are getting shorter, the wind is getting colder, and all over the world animals are on the move. This is a great time of year for you and your family to learn more about the earth’s phenomenal animal migrations. Ducks, geese, butterflies, whales, wildebeest and many more kinds of animals make yearly journeys to find better food and shelter as the seasons change. Here is a selection of Library resources on migrations for all members of your family.

For the very youngest, we have some terrific picture books that discuss migrations in very simple terms. April Pulley Sayre always has great non-fiction books for kids, so pick up a copy of Here Come the Humpbacks!  If you enjoy that,  Following Papa’s Song presents whale migrations as more of a story, for even younger readers.

Here Come the Humpbacks by April Pulley Sayre  Following Papa's Song by Giano Marino

Many children’s books have been written about butterfly migrations. Here are a couple of my favorites. Gotta Go! Gotta Go! by Sam Swope features repetition that will stick with your kids for months. Read one of these picture books and then check out the PBS video of butterfly migrations.

Gotta Go! Gotta Go! by Sam Swope  Hurry and the Monarch by Antoine O'Flathart    The Incredible Journey of the Butterflies produced by PBS

Don’t stop with whales and butterflies! Move on to the migrations of turtles, songbirds, caribou, and owls.

The Journey of a Turtle by Carolyn Scrace  Is This Panama? A Migration Story by Jan Thornhill

A Caribou Journey by Debbie S. Miller  Ookpik: The Travels of a Snowy Owl by Bruce Hiscock

The book Animal Migration by Jeanie Mebane and the Disneynature Migration DVD both give good overall information about migrations.

Animal Migration by Jeanie Mebane 

Older kids may by interesting in learning how scientists investigate migrations. Tracking Animal Movement is part of our Animal Trackers series of non-fiction books for upper elementary age kids. Moonbird is a great read for older kids or even adults.

Tracking Animal Movement by Tom Jackson  Moonbird: A Year on the Wing with the Great Survivor B95 by Philip Hoose

For adults, David Wilcove’s No Way Home provides an in-depth look at how animal migrations are changing in response to degraded or threatened ecosystems.

No Way Home by David Wilcove

For Dummies

What self-help, reference, and how-to books cover a wide range of topics, are authored by several knowledgeable collaborators, and are “the world’s best-selling reference brand,” with distinctive, bright yellow and black covers? Here’s a hint: these books cover about 2,500 titles with about 200 million books in print in dozens of languages across the world.

For Dummies reference books are advertised as guides for learners of every level because the information is broken down into easy to understand language. The Aurora Public Library District has several For Dummies titles over a wide variety of topics to help you learn without being intimidated by information or prose.

For Dummies is owned by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., which is a global publishing company founded in 1807. The company publishes online products, journals, encyclopedias, and books in print format as well as electronically. For Dummies books are printed in a similar format, with comics, icons, and lists to help you remember what you’ve read.

The first For Dummies title was published in 1991, and from there almost 2,500 titles have been published in dozens of languages over topics including the arts, photography, business, computers, hobbies, cooking, health, sports, music, pets, and so many more. For more topics, you can visit their website here.

The Library has acquired several new For Dummies titles, like Facebook For Dummies and Windows 10 For Dummies, that you can check out on the For Dummies display at the Aurora Public Library. Other titles include Bridge For Dummies, Guitar For Dummies, Job Interviews For Dummies, and Shakespeare For Dummies, just to name a few!

“Success is for dummies.”

Happy Learning!

Vietnam War Display

The Vietnam War might have been one of the most controversial chapters in United States history. For the first time, Americans at home had a front-row seat to brutal battles from their television set, newspapers, and magazines. Images from the war were everywhere, and tensions were mounting between those opposed to America’s involvement in the war and those who supported the fighting.

The conflict began when communist North Vietnam and non-communist South Vietnam fought for control of the whole country. Active American involvement in the war began in 1954 with President Dwight D. Eisenhower pledging his support to South Vietnam. The war spanned decades, finally ending with the withdrawal of U.S. forces in 1973, with more than 3 million people killed, including 58,200 American men and women killed or missing in action. More than half of the deaths were Vietnamese civilians. For a timeline and a more in-depth look into the history of the war, click here.

In preparation for the upcoming premiere of the ten-part, eighteen-hour documentary series on PBS, you can view a Vietnam War display on the upper level at the Aurora Public Library and check out books related to that era. The documentary premieres on Sunday, September 17 at 8 p.m. on PBS. To learn more, visit these websites:

Library of Congress

National Archives

Happy Learning!