Resources

National Hot Tea Month

Well, I’m inspired to drink a cup of tea now that I know January is National Hot Tea Month!

Turn on the kettle, drop in the tea leaves and settle into one of Laura Childs’ cozy Tea Shop mysteries. The long-running series began with Death by Darjeeling and Gunpowder Green and continues through Broken Bone China, published in 2019.

Death by Darjeeling by Laura Childs Gunpowder Green by Laura Childs Broken Bone China by Laura Childs

You’ll also want to check out The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes by Victoria magazine. The book includes information about serving tea, suggested menus and recipes, and charming tea passages from literary classics like Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Don’t forget that the library also has copies of Tea Time magazine to turn to for inspiration!

The Charms of Tea: Reminiscences and Recipes   

For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose

 

 

 

Don’t worry if you’re more of a non-fiction reader! You can learn about how the English managed to smuggle tea out of China in For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose.

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure you include your children and grandchildren in a tea party this month, and share one of these children’s books with them.

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham

 

 

 

 

Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham is a short chapter book with the delightful feel of a legend or fable.

 

 

 

 

Of course, there are also tea-themed books for the very youngest readers.

Tea Rex by Molly Idle

Fancy Nancy Tea Parties by Jane O'Connor

“Yes, that’s it!” said the Hatter with a sigh. “It’s always tea time.”

             – Lewis Carroll

Traditional Christmas Tales

 

The Aurora Public Library District has wonderful holiday stories to share with children of all ages, from The Night Before Christmas to newer books like Santa’s Story by Will Hillenbrand. When you’re choosing the stories you want to share or the stories you want to read, don’t forget to include some of these classic stories. They range from a few pages long to a story that will require several sittings to complete, but they are guaranteed to help you think about Christmas in a new way. Who knows? You might start a new holiday tradition with your family.

Before it was a ballet, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King was a story written by E.T.A. Hoffman. We have several retellings of this at the library, including ones illustrated by Maurice Sendak and Mary Englebreit. For adults, there is a Nutcracker origin tale written by Gregory Maguire, the author of Wicked.

Mary Engelbreit's Nutcracker    Hiddensee by Gregory Maguire

You probably know Pearl S. Buck as the author of the Pulitzer-winning novel The Good Earth. Did you know she also wrote a lovely Christmas short story called Christmas Day in the Morning? Another great read-aloud is The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomeya touching story of the power of kindness.

Christmas Day in the Morning by Pearl S. Buck  The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey

For many of us, Christmas is not complete without some version of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Read it, or perhaps watch the DVD. We have  the George C. Scott version as well as Disney and Muppet versions. Another Christmas classic is The Gift of the Magi, complete with O. Henry’s signature ironic twist.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens  The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Other books in the Library offer collections of holiday stories and poems. You can find tales by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Henry Van Dyke, Madeleine L’Engle, Lois Lenski, and others. You’re sure to enjoy old favorites and discover new timeless tales to brighten your holiday season.

Home for Christmas: Stories for Young and Old A Newbery Christmas A Christmas Treasury of Yuletide Stories & Poems

 

Libby: One Tap App

The power of an app is almighty. However, if the app is too complicated to use, more likely than not, we’ll delete it. There are thousands of apps for social media, a million for gaming, and hundreds for reading. While Overdrive was the original reading app for the Aurora Public Library digital library patrons to use, we’ve been introduced to a new app called Libby, which was created by the same company that created Overdrive.

Libby is a simple to use reading app. While Overdrive has many tabs you have to click to do one simple thing, Libby is a one tap app. Once you download Libby, and login using your library card number and pin, you can start looking for titles on the very next page. Libby takes away several steps that Overdrive has and simplifies it. You can do so many amazing things with Libby!

You can add more than one library card.

You can listen to audiobooks at your own pace.

You can adjust your reading settings (font, size, space).

You can filter your Preferences to see books for specific age groups (kids, teens, adults).

You can borrow eBooks from our library and send them to your kindle!

You can change the lending period on the titles you borrow.

You can borrow magazines, eBooks, and audio books as well as videos!

The only downfall to Libby? She’s not available on as many devices as Overdrive is. Libby is only available on google Play, Apple Store, and Microsoft store. However, the creators of the app are working diligently to make Libby more compatible with other devices as well. Don’t worry though, you can set Libby to send eBooks to your kindle and still be able to read on your kindle!

New in Non-Fiction

Maybe you’ve noticed that we’ve been adding a lot of new non-fiction books to our collection lately. The role of non-fiction books in public libraries has evolved in the past thirty years, with fewer people using print reference books, but with many people still reading popular non-fiction for pleasure or in support of a hobby. We try to purchase books from a variety of viewpoints (politics, anyone?) and buy many of the books on current best-seller lists. We are always open to suggestions, so don’t be shy about making recommendations! If there is a particular area of the collection that you think we need to update, feel free to let us know.

Here’s a sampling of the non-fiction titles currently on the New Shelf at one of our branches. We don’t always buy a copy for each branch, so once you scroll past the images, I’ll explain a way to see the new non-fiction at “the other branch”.

The Weather Machine by Andrew Blum Unfreedom of the Press by Mark R. Levin The Stressed Years of Their Lives by Hibbs and Rostain The Last Pirate of New York by Rich Cohen

The Idle Beekeeper by Bill Anderson The Family Next Door by John Glatt Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz A Tree in the House by Annabelle Hickson

Rough Magic by Lara Prior Palmer Reading Behind Bars by Jill Grunenwald One-Stitch Baby Knits by Val Pierce On the Clock by Emily Guendelsberger

Grow Your Own Herbs by Selsinger and Tucker Gather at the River by various authors Furious Hours by Casey Cep Chaos by Tom O'Neill

Down From the Mountain by Bryce Andrews  Blended Embroidery by Brian Haggard Beneath the Tamarind Sky by Isha Sesay Ballpark by Paul Goldberger

Basic Welding by William Galvery    Songs of America by Meacham and McGraw   Macrame for Home Decor by Samantha Grenier

There are actual two simple ways to search for new items that may not be at your regular branch. First, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame on the right-side of the page, select On-Line Catalog and hit “Go!” without entering a search term. This gets you into the catalog. You should see a tab labeled “New at the Library”. Click on that, and you can scroll through all the items added in the last couple of weeks.

Another method is to use the “Classic Catalog”. Again, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame, click on “Looking for the Classic Catalog.” Under the heading Classic Catalog, click on “Submit” without entering a search term. Follow the rest of these steps to locate new non-fiction:

  • Click “Search”.
  • Click on the “New” tab and select a time period in the box called “Received Since”.
  • Click “Set Limits” and scroll through the collection box to find “Non-Fiction.”
  • Select “All Branches”, “Aurora”, or “Dillsboro”, and hit “OK”
  • When it takes you back to the orange “New” screen, just click on “Search”
  • You should have a list of the newest Non-Fiction items at your chosen branch.

Happy Reading!

School Stress

 

Making Choices and Making Friends

Growing FriendshipsSometimes, as adults, we forget how stressful school can be for children and teens. We never want to see our children struggle with social skills, educational challenges, or other school-related stresses. In addition to asking for advice from your child’s teacher, the library also has some resources to help you and your kids learn how to develop the assets they need to succeed in school.

Some of these titles are only available at the Aurora Public Library, but we’re always happy to send items to the Dillsboro Public Library, if that is more convenient for you.

How to Do Homework Without Throwing Up    Speak Up and Get Along!   Stress Can Really Get on Your Nerves

True or False? Tests Stink!   Proud to be YouCliques, Phonies, and Other Baloney

School & Library Connection

Are you a South Dearborn Community School Corporation Educator? If so, there are many ways the Aurora Public Library can assist you with your classroom.

We love to help with the obvious materials such as books and DVD’s.   However, there are many other services we can offer to you and your students.

 

If you are interested in learning more, we would love to see you at our “School and Library Connection” workshop at the Aurora Public Library on Wednesday July 31, 2019. at 9 am.  😊 Bring your device!  

  • During our program, we will walk you through the library’s website, focusing on requesting individual books, groups of books, and traveling book sets.

  • We will show you the many die cuts that we have available.  These die cuts can be used from everything from bulletin boards to crafts. You can bring your own paper and cut here at the library.  You can also check the die cuts out just like a book to cut at your school building if your building has a die cut machine.

  • We will introduce you to the many Online Resources we have available through the website – especially World Book.

  • We will show you how to use Overdrive on your devices and with the students. Students love Overdrive because they can use this directly from their school Chromebooks.

  • With advance notice we are also happy to bring a program to your classroom.

This is a free workshop for any K-12 Educator in the South Dearborn Community School district.

There will be coffee, muffins and donuts and there will be door prizes! 🙂

Coffee and Donuts

Please RSVP by sending an email to:  stephanie@eapld.org  by Wednesday, July 10

 

To the Moon and Back: Rockets and Orbits

Have you ever wondered how NASA gets their equipment into outer space? Getting satellites and humans into orbit and beyond is not an easy feat. It takes Rocket Science!

Teens are invited to join us on Thursday June 6, 2019 at 6:00 pm at the Aurora Public Library.

Dr. Wesley Ryle, a professor of Astronomy at Thomas More University will be presenting a program about the moon.  We will be looking at what it takes to reach orbit around the Earth, leave Earth and go to the Moon. Participants can test their skills using a rocket simulator/game. Do you have what it takes to become an astronaut?

Registration is not required for this free event.

The Baby Basket

The Aurora Public Library is a proud partner of The Baby Basket ‘Store’. This is a non-profit organization serving families in need of additional resources. The Baby Basket “Store” offers new and gently used clothing for newborn and toddlers up to 36 months and even offers equipment and other supplies needed.

This organization works by eligible participants earning points by using support services. If a participating family attends one of the Aurora Public Library District’s programs, the family will then receive points for attending.  Participants may redeem point for diapers, clothes, or other necessities by shopping at the Baby Basket ‘Store’. Low income families and parents-to-be with children from birth to 36 months may qualify for the program.

The Baby Basket ‘Store’ can be found at 304 Fourth St. Aurora Indiana 47001. Their hours of operation will be from 1-6pm on the second Friday of the month with the exception of inclement weather.

If you would like to help support The Baby Basket, you can help by:

  1. Serve as a volunteer in the organization.
  2. Make a financial donation to help purchase items and supplies.
  3. Sponsor an event (Baby shower, yard sale, raffle) to benefit the Baby Basket.
  4. Donate gently used or new baby or toddler clothing (any sizes from newborn to 4T), high chairs, strollers, swings, pack ‘n plays, etc.
  5. Sign your Kroger Card up for Community Rewards to support the Baby Basket (This doesn’t impact your gas credits.)

If you have any questions, please call 812-926-3000.

Popular Audiobooks for Overdrive in 2018

Audiobooks have been very popular for many years.  Audiobooks come in many formats. The Aurora Public Library District is proud to offer many books on CD’s.  Another option is to listen to Audiobooks through the Overdrive App at the Indiana Digital Download Center

If you log into Overdrive using your library card number and your PIN you can see the availability of the title you are interested in.  If you need assistance in setting up a PIN or with downloading the app please stop into the Aurora or the Dillsboro libraries and we would be happy to assist you. 

What I like best about audiobooks is that you can do other things while you listen to the story.  I like to listen to an audio book in the car. I also will listen to an audiobook while I am cleaning the house.  Audiobooks can also be a great resource for those who have vision problems.

In 2018 some of The Most Popular Audio Books for Overdrive Were:

Convenience Store Woman

by Sayaka Murata 

  Convenience Store Woman

36-year old Keiko Furukura has always struggled with fitting in. Keiko begins working at a convenience store when she is 18 years old.  Keiko enjoys her job but faces criticism from her family to get married and to find a real job.

Sayaka Murata’s novel tackles the subject of the pressure to conform and the effect it has on someone mentally.

The Outsider

by Stephen King

A child is found murdered in a park.  All signs seem to point in the direction of one of the town’s most upstanding citizens.  Many in the community have a difficult time believing that this father, Little League coach and English teacher is the one who committed this heinous crime.  Could this man be hiding a dark secret?

The Simple Truth

by David Baldacci

The Simple Truth

Secrets have a way of coming out.  John Fiscke is a former cop who is now an attorney.  John is trying to figure out who killed his brother Michael.  Did a case that Michael was working on lead to his murder? The one man who can help John figure out the mystery has escaped from prison and is on the run.  

The Great Alone

by Kristin Hannah

The Great Alone

When 13 year old Keni Albright’s father Ernt returns from Vietnam he is not the same man.  Ernt Albright had been a POW. Ernt decides to move his family to Alaska where they will live off the grid.  Keni and her mother realize that Ernt’s mental state is deteriorating. Keni realizes that they only have each other to rely on.  Kristin Hannah’s novel explore the effects that war can have on a man.

Ambush

by James Patterson

Ambush

New York Detective Michael Bennett and his family are the only thing that is keeping two drug cartels out of a profitable opioid trade.  How can Bennett save his family?

Frederick Douglass

by David W. Blight

Frederick Douglas

A biography of a former escaped slave who went on to become a major literary figure.  Frederick Douglass went on to publish his own newspaper and was one of the leading abolitionists and writers of his era.  

A Higher Loyalty

by James Comey

A Higher Loyalty

James Comey was the director of the FBI from 2013-2017.  In this memoir, Comey shares his experience in prosecuting and investigating some of the most high profile cases in recent history.

There There

by Tommy Orange

There There

This novel follows a day in the life of 12 Urban Indians living in Oakland Ca.  Each of them have different reasons for attending the Oakland City Powwow. A fateful event on this day brings them all together in ways they could not imagine.  

Washington Black

by Esi Edugyan

Washington Black

Esi Edugyan tells the story of “Wash,” an 11 year old field slave.  Wash is terrified of being sold to his masters brother. Wash comes to find out that his new owner is an abolitionist.  When a man is killed and Wash is blamed, Christopher and Wash flee and go on an adventure that takes them across the globe.  

Educated

by Tara Westover

Educated

Tara Westover’s memoir about making the decision to go to college against her family’s wishes.  Westover had been raised in the mountains of Idaho by Mormon survivalists. Home schooled by her mother and never taken to a doctor, Westover did not even have a birth certificate until she was 9 years old.  

For other popular audio books offered through the Indiana Digital download center please visit their audio book page by clicking here.  

 

Happy Listening!  🙂