Reaching and Reading

Reading Slumps

I totally just made those definitions up. But I think every reader has been stuck in a reading slump before! I know I’ve had my fair share. What can we do to get out of one?

First, you can go to the Online Resources tab on our website and scroll down until you see Novelist. From there you can search your favorite book, author, or series and come up with lists of title-, author-, and series-read-a-likes you might enjoy. You can even search by genre and age. You can also check out Select Reads under the same tab on the website that is similar.

If you don’t have an account with Goodreads, I definitely recommend that you make one! It’s kind of like Facebook for book lovers. You can read synopses of books, add them to various lists, and get recommendations based on the ratings you give books you’ve read. There are also blogs, author interviews, and trivia you can browse through to find your next great read.

Try rereading your most favorite books; you can’t go wrong there because you already know you’ll love it! Maybe it will spark your interest in something new!

Try short story collections, poetry, novellas, or graphic novels. These are quick reads that you can breeze through just to keep you reading. Plus, if you’re on Goodreads and participate in the yearly reading challenge, these reads are a great way to boost your numbers!

Take a list of books you’ve been meaning to read, write down each title on a slip of paper, and put those papers in a hat or a jar. Draw one at random and force yourself to read it. Even if you wind up not liking the book and quitting halfway through, you’ll be ready to either draw another title or pick another title for yourself.

Browse most popular books, get recommendations from your friends, or start reading reviews online. The Library also has magazines that you can check out dedicated to popular book and new release reviews. You could also check out what the Library book clubs are reading for the month; if you sign up and come to a discussion, you’ll be able to be around book-minded people like yourself who will be able to point you in the right direction.

Still having trouble? Ask us for help! We LOVE recommending books to patrons! It’s our job to know all kinds of books, and we handle tons of books on a daily basis. Chances are we’ll be able to find something for you!

Good luck and Happy Reading!

Show Us Where You Read!

Calling all readers! Let’s have some fun!

Show us where you read!

Share a picture of where you read to our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages and be sure to tag us! They can be pictures of you reading, or the view from your favorite reading spot… the possibilities are endless! Let us know what your favorite books are, what you’re currently reading, who your favorite author is, and more! Tag us in your recent library haul; what awesome books, audiobooks, and movies did you find? We can’t wait to interact with you!

If you haven’t already, be sure to follow us!

Search Aurora Public Library District on Facebook!

Our handle is @auroralibrary on Twitter!

Look for @auroralibrary on Instagram!

Keep up-to-date on all things library-related, interact with like-minded library lovers, comment, retweet, and like posts, and even ask questions. We would love to hear from you!

Happy Reading!

Quantum Leap Shelfie Challenge

Explore the spirit of possibility and problem-solving with the Quantum Leap Shelfie Challenge, a program sponsored by Indiana Humanities. The goal is to bridge the humanities with science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine, which we can do simply by reading! Below are ten books about women and girls in science. If you read five books and tell Indiana Humanities what you thought, they will send you a $10 Amazon gift card to buy your next great read! For more information, follow the link to the Indiana Humanities website.

The Aurora Public Library District owns copies of:

The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly

The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer L. Holm

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

You could also request copies of the next books through Interlibrary Loan:

Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science by Jeannine Atkins

Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks

Radioactive! How Irene Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World by Winifred Conkling

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua

Wonder at the Edge of the World by Nicole Helgut

Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs

Happy Reading! Good luck!

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

Families are invited to join the 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program at the Aurora Public Library District. The 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program is a nationwide challenge that encourages parents and caregivers to regularly read aloud to their children. By reading just one book a night, families can reach the 1,000-book goal in three years and provide their children with essential early literacy skills. 

Research shows that the most reliable predictor of school success is being read to during early childhood. Reading to children from an early age can help close the vocabulary gap and prepare children to enter kindergarten with the skills they need to succeed. Most importantly, sharing books with children promotes a lifelong love of books and reading.

The 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program is available to all families with children between the ages of birth and five years and is totally free! Registration is open. For more information, call the library at 812-926-0646 or visit our website at https://eapld.org/programs/ When you register, you’ll receive a free book bag and a Reading Log. Each time you read 100 books, bring your reading record to the library to get a reward! We’ll celebrate with you as your child takes these first steps toward literacy.

One thousand books may seem like a lot, but if you read just one book a night, you’ll meet your goal in less than 3 years. If you read three books a night, you could reach your goal in just one year! Ask our friendly staff for suggestions—we’re here to help you on your journey to 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten!

 

5 Children’s books for the beginning of the school year!

School started…. it happened. It’s a crazy time of the year.

Everyone settling in, getting to know their new teacher.

Getting to know the new classrooms, rules, and daily routine is on top of everyone’s mind.

Here are 5 books we LOVE for reading during the first few weeks of school with your little ones.

Recess Queen by Alexis O’Neill

Conflict resolution and handling bullying are great topics to cover with your kids as they start the new year.

The Teacher from the Black Lagoon by Mike Thaler

Our imaginations while awesome can get the best of us, especially when it comes to our new teachers.

 

The Art Lesson by Tomie DePaola

School is full of new experiences and obstacles, this book offers you and your little one a great conversation starter to discuss problem-solving and overcoming these obstacles they will face throughout the school year.

If You Take a Mouse to School by  Laura Joffe Numeroff

The always funny and true experiences of how a small request can quickly snowball into something bigger, these books are always a great read.

This Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn.

And one for those of us who struggle with letting them go in the first place.

BACK TO SCHOOL! ALREADY??? PART 4

Bedtime – try to keep the same bedtime for your child throughout the school year.  Start now by making bedtime a little earlier each night. By the time school starts, your child will be back to a bedtime that will make it easier to get up and going in the morning.

 As much as possible, try to keep the same bedtime over the weekend and during school breaks. Students need to be well rested in order to do their best at school. Make sure you tell your child what the bedtime will be during the school year.  Look at a clock and help your child to know what the clock will look like at the given bedtime (digital and analog clocks). Webmd ( https://www.webmd.com/ ) recommends that children 6 to 13 years old get 10 to 11 hours of sleep each night and children 14 to 17 years old get 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night.

Most importantly, spend time reading a book together.  The library has a great selection of books you can read with your child. You can read a chapter book together with your older children and a picture book with younger children.

 

BEDTIME ROUTINE
Check alarm clock
Lay out clothes for the next day
Take a bath
Brush your teeth
Read a Story
Get a drink
Go to the bathroom
Go to bed at the set bedtime

 

         

BACK TO SCHOOL! ALREADY??? PART 2

Again, routines are essential for keeping a household running smoothly. Routines are necessary and helpful for children.

 

After School – once your child is at home from school, there should be a routine.  Establish what order your child will do these things: snack, homework, play time, reading time, taking a bath, etc.  When it is time for homework, make sure your child has all the necessary supplies easily available for the homework, pencils and a small pencil sharpener, glue, scissors, and crayons.  Keeping an additional school box at home with these supplies will make it easier to complete daily homework or work that is missed when a child is absent from school.

 

AFTER SCHOOL ROUTINE
snack
homework
play time
supper

 

       

BACK TO SCHOOL! ALREADY??? PART 1

How can you make the transition of going back to school easier for your household?  Start with establishing routines. Kids really do need and like structure and routine. They may fight you on it, but they really do need and want it!

 

Morning – have your child set an alarm clock.  Keep the alarm set for the same time each morning.  Make sure the wake up time will allow enough time for your child to get ready in the morning.  Once your child is awake, have him/her follow the morning routine each day. For example: get dressed, brush teeth, comb hair, eat breakfast, go out for the bus with the backpack and lunchbox (if your child has packed a lunch for school).

It is helpful to make a sign for your child with the routines listed.

 

 

MORNING ROUTINE
Get out of bed
Get dressed
Brush your teeth
Comb your hair
Eat breakfast
Get lunchbox out of fridge (if packing)
Gather your backpack (put on a coat if the weather is cold).
Watch for the bus

These books can be checked out at the library.

           

 

 

 

 

 

Indiana Early Literacy Firefly Award

The Firefly Award winner has been announced! Every year in the state of Indiana, five books are nominated by a committee made up of Indiana caregivers, librarians, project coordinators, and other professionals. These books are chosen for their ability to encourage parents and children to use the Every Child Ready to Read practices of talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing together. These five books are then voted on by children ages 0-5 years old. This year, over 5,000 children voted on the five nominated books collected at public libraries and daycares across the state.

And the winner is:

The other nominees include:

     

      

Click on each book to reserve your copy today! Happy Reading!

 

Who doesn’t love dinosaurs?

Kids of all ages (and adults) are fascinated with dinosaurs! That’s why I was so excited to see a new book of children’s poetry by David Elliott. In the Past is a large format picture book with a short dinosaur poem on each double-page spread; it’s perfect for sharing in one sitting or for reading in small bits.

In the Past by David Elliott

This latest book by Elliott only takes a slight turn from his previous books of poetry featuring animals in different habitats. Those of you who have attended our children’s programs in the past know that I love to share poems. It’s more than just a personal preference; there is firm research that shows poetry is a great way for kids to develop early literacy skills. Poems provide great examples of rhyme, rhythm and figurative language and also encourage us to look at the world around us in creative ways.

In the Sea by David Elliott    In the Wild by David Elliott

Pick up a David Elliott book to share with your family this April for National Poetry Month. For older readers, you might want to try Elliott’s book Bull, a novel written in verse that explores the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. You can find Bull in the teen area at the Aurora Public Library or on OverDrive.

On the Farm by David Elliott   Bull by David Elliott