Reaching and Reading

Kids Love Non-Fiction!

You’ve probably noticed changes in our library buildings as we’ve rearranged some of our collections. The biggest change is that we have created an area for children’s non-fiction books at both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library. We want kids to be able to find books that interest them more easily, without having to search through shelves that also have the “adult” stuff. We’ve also been adding some great new titles to keep our collection current and interesting. In this area, you’ll find everything from coding to science, from sign language to sports, and from religion to music. As always, we’re here to help you find what you and your children are interested in!

There are advantages to reading a mixture of books types, both fiction and non-fiction. Letting your child’s interests guide the selection is always a great way to keep them engaged with books. Here are a couple of interesting articles about reading non-fiction. The first is from a father’s perspective – how he discovered that non-fiction satisfied his daughter’s desire to learn about the world around her. The second article is from an educational perspective and discusses how reading non-fiction can increase comprehension of complex texts.

Here are some of our newest titles, but you really need to stop by and let your kids browse the collection to spark their interest!

Technology and science books are always popular, and we have lots of science project books to keep the kids busy during school breaks.

Drones by Elsie Olson

Science Maker Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “Scientists in the Field” series is great for older students and even adults. Each title in the series focuses on the work being done by scientists in a particular field.

Backyard Bears by Amy Cherrix

Read about a favorite athlete, or learn new techniques for playing a sport.

Aaron Judge by Jon M. Fishman  Breanna Stewart by Jon M. Fishman  My First Soccer Handbook by Clive Gifford

From domestic to exotic, we have everything you need to know about animals!

Baby Animals by Dorothea DepriscoSugar Gliders by Paula M. Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baking with kids encourages reading, teaches math skills, and leads to a healthy appetite!Good Housekeeping Kids Bake!

 

Explore the past with our great history books. In addition to The Underground Railroad, Kay Winter’s Voices series also includes Colonial Voices and Voices from the Oregon Trail.

   Machu Picchu by Christina Leaf     Voices from the Underground Railroad by Kay Winters

Wonderful New Picture Books

We have added some amazing picture books to our collection in the last few months! Many of these are from authors and illustrators who are the superstars of children’s literature – well-loved by parents and librarians everywhere. Others were created by authors who may be new to you, but whose work you’ll certainly want to start following. Here are some of my favorites, but you’ll want to come to the library and explore all the other great items on the “New” shelf.

Tessa Takes Wing by Richard Jackson

 

How can you keep from smiling when you see this adorable baby? Have you ever wondered what babies do when everyone else is asleep? If you are not familiar with Richard Jackson, I also recommend his books All Ears, All Eyes and This Beautiful Day.

 

 

A Parade of Elephants by Keven Henkes

 

 

 

A Parade of Elephants is every bit as charming as the rest of Kevin Henkes’ picture books. You may know him as the author of Lilly’s Purple, Plastic Purse, but he’s written a long list of both picture books and chapter books for kids. For your older kids, check out Junonia and The Year of Billy Miller.

 

The Snowy Nap by Jan Brett

 

 

Jan Brett is another author whose books are always popular. The Snowy Nap reintroduces the title character from Hedgie’s Surprise (written in 2000) and is a perfect book to snuggle up with on a cold day. Brett continues her practice of using border illustrations to give a hint of what’s coming on the next page.

 

 

I loved I’ll Wait, Mr. Panda by Steve Antony, so I was delighted to see another book about Mr. Panda. Who can resist another cute bedtime story?

 

Giraffe Problems by Jory John

 

 

 

 

 

The creative team that brought us Penguin Problems in 2016 is back with a story of a giraffe who can’t figure out what to do with his long neck!

 

Chomp Goes the Alligator by Matthew Van Fleet

 

 

 

 

Chomp Goes the Alligator is sure to become a favorite of preschoolers. It features counting, rhymes, and a movable alligator jaw!

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson

 

 

 

 

 

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson is perfect to share with any child who has ever experienced being different or outside of a group. Woodson’s words are always affirming and the illustrations by Rafael Lopez are vibrant and expressive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interrupting Chicken and the Elephant of Surprise by David Ezra Stein

 

 

The “Interrupting Chicken” is back! In this follow-up book, the young chicken is enjoying books with an “elephant of surprise”! This is one of those great picture books for kids who may be old enough to read independently, but who can really enjoy the humor caused by this misunderstanding.

 

STORY TIME IS BEGINNING!

 

STORY TIME IS BEGINNING

 

Story times will be starting in September.  The first story time at the Dillsboro Library  will be Tuesday, September 4 at 10:30. The first story times at the Aurora Library will be Wednesday, September 5 at 10:30 and 1:00.

NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. You will be asked to complete a short form at your first story time.   Story times will continue every Tuesday (at Dillsboro) and Wednesday (at Aurora) through December 19.

During the month of September we will cover the topics of water, the five senses, seeds, and the season of fall. We look forward to seeing you at the library for story time.

 

Reading Slumps

I totally just made those definitions up. But I think every reader has been stuck in a reading slump before! I know I’ve had my fair share. What can we do to get out of one?

First, you can go to the Online Resources tab on our website and scroll down until you see Novelist. From there you can search your favorite book, author, or series and come up with lists of title-, author-, and series-read-a-likes you might enjoy. You can even search by genre and age. You can also check out Select Reads under the same tab on the website that is similar.

If you don’t have an account with Goodreads, I definitely recommend that you make one! It’s kind of like Facebook for book lovers. You can read synopses of books, add them to various lists, and get recommendations based on the ratings you give books you’ve read. There are also blogs, author interviews, and trivia you can browse through to find your next great read.

Try rereading your most favorite books; you can’t go wrong there because you already know you’ll love it! Maybe it will spark your interest in something new!

Try short story collections, poetry, novellas, or graphic novels. These are quick reads that you can breeze through just to keep you reading. Plus, if you’re on Goodreads and participate in the yearly reading challenge, these reads are a great way to boost your numbers!

Take a list of books you’ve been meaning to read, write down each title on a slip of paper, and put those papers in a hat or a jar. Draw one at random and force yourself to read it. Even if you wind up not liking the book and quitting halfway through, you’ll be ready to either draw another title or pick another title for yourself.

Browse most popular books, get recommendations from your friends, or start reading reviews online. The Library also has magazines that you can check out dedicated to popular book and new release reviews. You could also check out what the Library book clubs are reading for the month; if you sign up and come to a discussion, you’ll be able to be around book-minded people like yourself who will be able to point you in the right direction.

Still having trouble? Ask us for help! We LOVE recommending books to patrons! It’s our job to know all kinds of books, and we handle tons of books on a daily basis. Chances are we’ll be able to find something for you!

Good luck and Happy Reading!

Show Us Where You Read!

Calling all readers! Let’s have some fun!

Show us where you read!

Share a picture of where you read to our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages and be sure to tag us! They can be pictures of you reading, or the view from your favorite reading spot… the possibilities are endless! Let us know what your favorite books are, what you’re currently reading, who your favorite author is, and more! Tag us in your recent library haul; what awesome books, audiobooks, and movies did you find? We can’t wait to interact with you!

If you haven’t already, be sure to follow us!

Search Aurora Public Library District on Facebook!

Our handle is @auroralibrary on Twitter!

Look for @auroralibrary on Instagram!

Keep up-to-date on all things library-related, interact with like-minded library lovers, comment, retweet, and like posts, and even ask questions. We would love to hear from you!

Happy Reading!

Quantum Leap Shelfie Challenge

Explore the spirit of possibility and problem-solving with the Quantum Leap Shelfie Challenge, a program sponsored by Indiana Humanities. The goal is to bridge the humanities with science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine, which we can do simply by reading! Below are ten books about women and girls in science. If you read five books and tell Indiana Humanities what you thought, they will send you a $10 Amazon gift card to buy your next great read! For more information, follow the link to the Indiana Humanities website.

The Aurora Public Library District owns copies of:

The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly

The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer L. Holm

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

You could also request copies of the next books through Interlibrary Loan:

Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science by Jeannine Atkins

Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks

Radioactive! How Irene Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World by Winifred Conkling

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua

Wonder at the Edge of the World by Nicole Helgut

Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs

Happy Reading! Good luck!

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

Families are invited to join the 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program at the Aurora Public Library District. The 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program is a nationwide challenge that encourages parents and caregivers to regularly read aloud to their children. By reading just one book a night, families can reach the 1,000-book goal in three years and provide their children with essential early literacy skills. 

Research shows that the most reliable predictor of school success is being read to during early childhood. Reading to children from an early age can help close the vocabulary gap and prepare children to enter kindergarten with the skills they need to succeed. Most importantly, sharing books with children promotes a lifelong love of books and reading.

The 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program is available to all families with children between the ages of birth and five years and is totally free! Registration is open. For more information, call the library at 812-926-0646 or visit our website at https://eapld.org/programs/ When you register, you’ll receive a free book bag and a Reading Log. Each time you read 100 books, bring your reading record to the library to get a reward! We’ll celebrate with you as your child takes these first steps toward literacy.

One thousand books may seem like a lot, but if you read just one book a night, you’ll meet your goal in less than 3 years. If you read three books a night, you could reach your goal in just one year! Ask our friendly staff for suggestions—we’re here to help you on your journey to 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten!

 

5 Children’s books for the beginning of the school year!

School started…. it happened. It’s a crazy time of the year.

Everyone settling in, getting to know their new teacher.

Getting to know the new classrooms, rules, and daily routine is on top of everyone’s mind.

Here are 5 books we LOVE for reading during the first few weeks of school with your little ones.

Recess Queen by Alexis O’Neill

Conflict resolution and handling bullying are great topics to cover with your kids as they start the new year.

The Teacher from the Black Lagoon by Mike Thaler

Our imaginations while awesome can get the best of us, especially when it comes to our new teachers.

 

The Art Lesson by Tomie DePaola

School is full of new experiences and obstacles, this book offers you and your little one a great conversation starter to discuss problem-solving and overcoming these obstacles they will face throughout the school year.

If You Take a Mouse to School by  Laura Joffe Numeroff

The always funny and true experiences of how a small request can quickly snowball into something bigger, these books are always a great read.

This Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn.

And one for those of us who struggle with letting them go in the first place.

BACK TO SCHOOL! ALREADY??? PART 4

Bedtime – try to keep the same bedtime for your child throughout the school year.  Start now by making bedtime a little earlier each night. By the time school starts, your child will be back to a bedtime that will make it easier to get up and going in the morning.

 As much as possible, try to keep the same bedtime over the weekend and during school breaks. Students need to be well rested in order to do their best at school. Make sure you tell your child what the bedtime will be during the school year.  Look at a clock and help your child to know what the clock will look like at the given bedtime (digital and analog clocks). Webmd ( https://www.webmd.com/ ) recommends that children 6 to 13 years old get 10 to 11 hours of sleep each night and children 14 to 17 years old get 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night.

Most importantly, spend time reading a book together.  The library has a great selection of books you can read with your child. You can read a chapter book together with your older children and a picture book with younger children.

 

BEDTIME ROUTINE
Check alarm clock
Lay out clothes for the next day
Take a bath
Brush your teeth
Read a Story
Get a drink
Go to the bathroom
Go to bed at the set bedtime

 

         

BACK TO SCHOOL! ALREADY??? PART 2

Again, routines are essential for keeping a household running smoothly. Routines are necessary and helpful for children.

 

After School – once your child is at home from school, there should be a routine.  Establish what order your child will do these things: snack, homework, play time, reading time, taking a bath, etc.  When it is time for homework, make sure your child has all the necessary supplies easily available for the homework, pencils and a small pencil sharpener, glue, scissors, and crayons.  Keeping an additional school box at home with these supplies will make it easier to complete daily homework or work that is missed when a child is absent from school.

 

AFTER SCHOOL ROUTINE
snack
homework
play time
supper