Musings

Happy Independence Day!

The Aurora Public Library District will be closed on

Friday, July 3rd, and Saturday, July 4th,

in celebration of Independence Day.

While you’re planning your holiday celebrations, why not check out a non-fiction book to help you learn more about the American Revolution? Here are some ideas to get you started. Don’t forget, you can also check out the digital selections on the Indiana Digital Download Center.

1776 by David McCullough The American Revolution: a World War The Drillmaster of Valley Forge by Paul Lockhart

Founding Fathers by K.M. Kostyal Founding Mothers by Cokie Roberts George Washington's Secret Six by Kilmeade and Yaeger

Independence Lost by Kathleen DuVal Inventing America by Garry Wills Killing England by Bill O'Reilly

The First Conspiracy by Brad Meltzer The Whites of Their Eyes by Paul Lockhart Washington's Revolution by Robert Middlekauff

 

It’s International Make Music Day!

June 21st is International Make Music Day! This holiday began in 1982 when France’s Ministry of Culture dreamed of a musical holiday. A day where free live music would be everywhere; street corners and parks, rooftops and gardens, store fronts and mountaintops would all be filled with the sound of music. And thus, Fête de la Musique, was born. A festival featuring free concerts in locations all around the city of Paris. Since then, the festival has become an international phenomenon. Make Music Day is now celebrated in more than 700 cities in 120 countries, including China, Germany, Greece, Brazil, Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Performers of any age and skill level are encouraged to join in on the music-making. The only caveats for these festivals are that the concerts must be free to the public, and all performers are to donate their time free of charge.

In North America

Twelve years ago, the Fête de la Musique crossed the Atlantic with the debut of Make Music New York. The event began as a grassroots initiative by a team of volunteers and quickly became a city-wide event. Today, around 5,000 New York musicians perform in more than 1,000 free outdoor concerts every year. The festival was so popular in New York that it soon spread throughout North America. In 2019, 85 North American cities organized free concerts at 1,862 locations. All on a single day.

Locally, the closest Make Music Day festival is located in Cincinnati. Last year, Make Music Cincinnati held concerts in over 100 locations throughout the city.

2020 Festival

Due to the threat of COVID-19, Make Music Day will look a little different this year. Make Music is exploring new ways to continue the tradition of making music, while also following all the appropriate guidelines. One of the ways they are doing this is by changing their Sousapalooza event (an invitation for hundreds of brass, wind, and percussion players to come together and sight-read the music of John Philip Sousa), to the World’s Smallest Marching Band. In this event, individual brass and wind players will parade through cities, by themselves, playing band repertoire to people listening from their homes or workplaces.

The organization is also encouraging musicians to utilize social media, and post videos of themselves making music. “In this time of social distancing, music’s powerful role to bring us together as a community is more important than ever,” said Make Music Alliance President Aaron Friedman. “While physical public gatherings may not be currently accessible, we can still stay connected and celebrate music with people around the world on June 21.”


Are you a musician? It’s your time to shine! You can participate in Make Music Day by posting a video or going live on social media with the hashtag #MakeMusicDay

Still honing your music skills? We have a book for that!

                    

 

It’s National Kitten Day!

When it comes to holidays, July 10th is the most puuurfect of all! It’s National Kitten Day! This holiday was created to raise awareness of the importance of spaying or neutering your pets and adopting shelter pets! Don’t know how to celebrate today’s holiday? Consider donating money or supplies to your local shelter! We’re celebrating with adorable kitten gifs!

Check out some of our books on cats and kittens right meow!

                       

 

It’s National Best Friends Day!

June 8th is National Best Friends Day! This lighthearted holiday began in 1935 when the US Congress decided to devote a day to close friends. National Best Friends Day has given rise to other national holidays such as Friendship Day, Women’s Friendship Day, and an entire week called Old Friends, New Friends Week. The holiday has gained popularity over the last 5 years due to the rise of social media, and even has its own hashtag to go with it. Don’t forget to show your friends some love on social media today with the hashtag #nationalbestfriendsday

 

Check out some of our books on friendship!

                                  

Take It, Make It: Shapes

Beginning June 8, 2020, the first Take It, Make It activity will be available at both branches! Take It, Make It activities are projects that can be done at home with materials you can pick up at the library! You can also request curbside pick up. Just call 812-926-0646 (Aurora) or 812-954-4151 (Dillsboro) and let us know how many of the activities you need for your family!

This week’s activity is shapes! Stop by and pick up your bag of paper shapes, take them home, and let your imagination run wild! What can you create? You can check out this picture for inspiration, or you can make something totally original!  If you want your creation to be featured on our social media, send a picture to Ms. Stephanie at stephanie@eapld.org. Make sure to include if we have permission to share your picture and name on our socials. Pictures must be submitted by June 20, 2020.

You can download and print the entire summer schedule here, or you can pick one up at either branch.

Don’t forget! There’s still time to get started on your summer reading log! If our patrons collectively read 1,500 books, one lucky patron gets to throw a pie in Ms. Stephanie’s face! You can find more information on reading logs and the pie contest here.


 

Ashton’s Literary Ramblings: Kiera Cass: The Betrothed

I’ve always been a fan of YA Romance. Between reading The Twilight Saga, The Hunger Games, and the Divergent Series, I’ve been well taken care of in the YA Romance department. However, two years ago, I discovered Kiera Cass‘s series, The Selection. It was such a great series to read; I would definitely rank it with the other YA series listed above. Cass reports on her web page that The Selection will be made into a Netflix movie sometime in the future.

A new YA Romance by Cass was published on May 5, 2020,  and I couldn’t be more excited to read it!  I’m even more curious to see how it will differ from The Selection series!

When King Jameson declares his love for Lady Hollis Brite, Hollis is shocked—and thrilled. After all, she’s grown up at Keresken Castle, vying for the king’s attention alongside other daughters of the nobility. Capturing his heart is a dream come true.

But Hollis soon realizes that falling in love with a king and being crowned queen may not be the happily ever after she thought it would be. And when she meets a commoner with the mysterious power to see right into her heart, she finds that the future she really wants is one that she never thought to imagine.

-Goodreads

First of all, that cover is beautiful! Secondly, I literally cannot wait to read this! The eager book beaver inside of me just wants this book right this very second! Kiera Cass has a way of writing about royalty that keeps the characters likeable and interesting, rather than overbearing or annoying. As with her other books, I know that Cass will weave a tale that draws me into a world of intrigue and romance.

It’s National Paper Airplane Day!

May 26th is National Paper Airplane Day! This day commemorates the aeronautical toy that you know and love!

A Brief History of Paper Airplanes

Though most historians agree that the paper airplane was most likely invented in Ancient China, there is also evidence of paper gliders being used in Japan around the same time. That being said, experts have been unable to pinpoint an exact time and location of the first paper airplane. They only know that they have been flown for centuries all over the world.

Paper airplanes gained popularity in the United States during World War II when it was no longer possible to make toys out of plastic or metal. Some of the more popular planes at this time were designed by Wallis Rigby. He published his models as books or box sets, and his designs had a “tab and slot” construction. Rigby’s models are considered collector’s items today.

More recently, with the popularity of paper airplanes growing, enthusiasts around the world started some friendly competition and began attempting world records. Guinness World Records recognizes two main paper airplane records. The first, the farthest flight by a paper aircraft, was achieved in 2012 by Joe Ayoob and aircraft designer John M. Collins in the United States. Ayoob flew the aircraft designed by Collins 226 feet and 10 inches. The second, the longest flying paper aircraft, was achieved in 2010 by Takuo Toda in Japan. Toda’s plane was airborne for 29.2 seconds.

Make Your Own Paper Airplane

Follow these steps to make a basic paper airplane!

Begin with a piece of regular 8.5″ by 11″ paper.

Fold the paper in half vertically. Once you create a crease, unfold the paper again.

Fold the top two corners into the center crease.

Fold the top edges into the center crease.

Fold the paper in half along your original center crease.

Fold the wings down, matching the top edges up with the bottom edge of the body.

Add some tape to hold the wings together, and you’re finished!

 

Check out some of our books on paper airplanes!

                                           

Happy flying!

 

 

 

No Fear Shakespeare

Have you ever wanted to give Shakespeare a try, but soon realized you couldn’t understand anything on the page? Is your English teacher making you read Macbeth, but you’re unsure what you’re reading? Are you tired of missing the entire Shakespeare category on Jeopardy? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then No Fear Shakespeare is for you! No Fear Shakespeare gives you the complete Shakespearean text on the left-hand side with an easy to understand translation on the right! APLD has fifteen Shakespeare plays in this format, as well as a book dedicated solely to his sonnets. The days of not understanding Shakespeare are in the past with No Fear Shakespeare! Get ready to impress your friends with all your Shakespearean knowledge! Check out the examples below of the titles we have available at the library! Click on a book cover to learn more!

 

Hamlet

Original Text

To be or not to be? That is the question-
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And, by opposing, end them? To die, to sleep-
No more- and by a sleep to say we end
The heartache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to- ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wished! To die, to sleep.
To sleep, perchance to dream.

 

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

The question is: is it better to be alive or dead? Is it nobler to put up with all the nasty things that luck throws your way, or to fight against all those troubles by simply putting an end to them once and for all? Dying, sleeping—that’s all dying is—a sleep that ends all the heartache and shocks that life on earth gives us—that’s an achievement to wish for. To die, to sleep—to sleep, maybe to dream.

 

Macbeth

Original Text

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two.
Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—
Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard?
What need we fear who knows it, when
none can call our power to account?—Yet
who would have thought the old man to
have had so much blood in him.

 

 

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

Come out, damned spot! Out, I command you! One, two. OK, it’s time to do it now.—Hell is murky!—Nonsense, my lord, nonsense! You are a soldier, and yet you are afraid? Why should we be scared, when no one can lay the guilt upon us?—But who would have thought the old man would have had so much blood in him?

 

King Lear

Original Text

Turn all her mother’s pains and benefits
To laughter and contempt, that she may feel—
That she may feel
How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is
To have a thankless child.—Away, away!

 

 

 

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

Let it be a wicked child who mocks the mother who cares for it. Make my daughter feel—make her feel how an ungrateful child hurts worse than a snakebite.—Now let’s leave. Go!

 

Julius Caesar

Original Text

Men at some time are masters of their fates.
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesar—what should be in that “Caesar”?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
Write them together, yours is as fair a name.
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well.

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

Men can be masters of their fate. It is not destiny’s fault, but our own faults, that we’re slaves. “Brutus” and “Caesar.” What’s so special about “Caesar”? Why should that name be proclaimed more than yours? Write them together—yours is just as good a name. Pronounce them—it is just as nice to say.

 

Romeo and Juliet

Original Text

But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she.

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

But wait, what’s that light in the window over there? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Rise up, beautiful sun, and kill the jealous moon . The moon is already sick and pale with grief because you, Juliet, her maid, are more beautiful than she.

 

Midsummer Night’s Dream

Original Text

Love can transpose to form and dignity.
Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind.
And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

 

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

Love can make worthless things beautiful. When we’re in love, we don’t see with our eyes but with our minds. That’s why paintings of Cupid, the god of love, always show him as blind.

 

Much Ado About Nothing

Original Text

He that hath a beard
is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than
a man; and he that is more than a youth is not for me, and
he that is less than a man, I am not for him. Therefore I will
even take sixpence in earnest of the bearherd, and lead his
apes into hell.

 

No Fear Shakespeare Translation

If he has a beard, he’s more than a boy; if he doesn’t have a beard, he’s less than a man. If he’s more than a boy, he’s not the one for me, and if he’s less than a man, I’m not the one for him. They say that women who die unmarried are destined to lead the apes to hell, and I suppose that’ll be my fate as well.

 

Check out our other No Fear Shakespeare titles!

                      


                     


                    

What Next?

HAVE YOU READ EVERYTHING YOUR FAVORITE AUTHOR EVER WROTE?  Sometimes it’s a year or even more until the next book is released. What is a reader supposed to do? Do you wander through the stacks trying to choose by the short blurb inside the jacket, or maybe by the title and the look of the cover? What about choosing something because your friend recommended it? Even though they are your “bestie”, they may read very differently than you do. Bestseller lists are no guarantee that the book will suit your tastes. The library can help; every member of the staff is trained in what is called Readers Advisory. Ask us to help you out, just be prepared to answer a few questions such as “what was the last thing you read that you really liked?” and “what was it that you liked about it?”

If you prefer to find books on your own, but wish there was a better way, the library can help with that too. On our web-page under the online resources tab you’ll find these reading resources:

Novelist

NoveList is a fiction database that provides subject heading access, reviews, annotations, and much more for over 120,000 fiction titles. It also includes other content of interest to fiction readers, such as Author Read-alikes, Book Discussion Guides, BookTalks, and Feature Articles.

eSequels

eSequels is a website that contains information about series. Information is provided about characters, subjects, correct reading order and more. eSequels is the place to learn everything about your favorite book series.

Author Check 

An easy way to track your favorite authors.  Receive email alerts when the library receives a new book by authors you’ve selected. A full database of authors and their books, that the library owns, including author profiles.

Select Reads 

Discovering books that match your interests just got easier with SelectReads. Get monthly emails reading and recommendations customized to match your interests.

To let us help you discover your next favorite author or genre, stop by or go online at www.eAPLD.org