Aurora Public Library District

Dollar-a-Bag Book Sale

Our Dillsboro branch will be holding its $1-A-Bag Book Sale on May 14th & 15th. You’ll find something for everyone on your list – mysteries, thrillers, romance, classics, westerns, travel, crafts, DIY, DVDs, audio books, CDs, children’s books, large print, magazines, cookbooks and much, much more.

Hours are Friday the 14th from 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM and Saturday the 15th from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM.  Shop early and often. New books are continuously being added to the selection.

New WW II Fiction

Historical fiction is one of our most popular genres, and during the last few years, there have been some amazing novels written about World War II. Right now, we have a great selection of those on our “New Release” shelf, which means the books have been in the Library less than 4 months. Take a look at these newer books, but also share the name of your favorite WW II novel by posting the title and author in the comments.

The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear The Elephant of Belfast by S. Kirk Walsh

The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear is unique among the listed books because it is part of the long-running Maisie Dobbs series. The rest of the books shown are stand-alone novels. Fans of the series know that Maisie served as a nurse in The Great War, trained as a private investigator, and now runs her own investigative agency. The Elephant of Belfast is notable for its focus on a short episode in the war’s history, the 1941 bombardment of Belfast.

Eternal by Lisa Scottoline The Girl from the Channel Islands by Jenny Lecoat

Although many WW II novels are set in either France or England, Eternal by Lisa Scottoline is set in Italy and begins with Mussolini’s rise to power. If you are a fan of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, The Girl from the Channel Islands takes you to a similar setting during the German occupation.

The Last Night in London by Karen White  The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

Set during the London Blitz, The Last Night in London offers readers a story of friendship and espionage with a twist of betrayal. The Rose Code is also a spy novel, this time set in the top-secret facility known as Bletchley Park.

We seem to never get enough of World War fiction, so let us know your favorites!

Bleak Books with Olivia: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Have you ever read a book all the way through just to close it for the last time and say “wow, that was bleak”? Well, I’m here to make the case for those dark, dreary, haunting, and disturbing reads that keep you up at night long after you put them down. Welcome to Bleak Books with Olivia, your resident creepy book lover at the Aurora Public Library District.

I think it’s about time for a return to the classics, don’t you? The Picture of Dorian Gray has been on my want-to-read list for months. When discussing dastardly books, this one in particular always seems to come up in conversation at some point. Maybe it’s the cast full of unlikable characters, or maybe it’s the descent into all-out hedonism that drags our title character down into the depths of pure evil. Or maybe, it’s just a good, old-fashioned hate-read (I cast my vote for the latter). Either way, this book is the one to reach for when you just want a downright sickening read.

I must preface this review by saying that I actually enjoyed this book, and found it an easy read. All the parts were there to keep me flipping the pages well into the wee hours of the morning: drama, intrigue, a couple deaths, and, of course, art (I’m an art historian, so I was sold on that front!) but there was just something that really rubbed me the wrong way… in the best way.

Dorian Gray is a remarkably beautiful young man approaching adulthood when he is taken by a painter, Basil Hallward, to be his muse. At the studio, Dorian meets Lord Henry Wotton, a brilliant, conniving older man with a taste for the hedonistic, despite Victorian society conventions. Lord Henry convinces Dorian that aging will ruin his beauty and render him useless and irrelevant in the near future and Dorian begins to panic, making a foolish wish to transfer all of his blemishes, wrinkles, and marks of indulgence to a portrait Basil recently made of him. The wish works, and once Dorian discovers he will not age any longer, his lust for life grows to disastrous proportions that comes with a body count.

This book, as I mentioned before, became not just a hate-read, but an full-on loathe-read. Almost every character in the book is male, and often they gather around and discuss modern life, which always seems to involve several quips about how women are useless for anything other than being a beautiful wife. Dorian himself also becomes a reason to hate this book with all his pompous self-adoration and his complete foolishness throughout the entire novel. Wilde tried to make me sympathize with Dorian, who was led astray at an innocent young age by an arguably predatory older man, but it’s incredibly difficult to feel bad for a boy who knows of his wrongdoings, continues to do them, and even leaves a body count in his wake. Maybe Dorian Gray’s portrait preserves his atrocious attitude from boyhood well into his older years along with his good looks.

Although this description may have thrown you off, I encourage you to read it anyway! This book gives an honest depiction of how obsession with youth and beauty will do nothing but eat you alive. As I said before, it truly is a “loathe-read”, but you will at least finish the book with the satisfaction of knowing you certainly aren’t the only one that hates Dorian Gray.

Thank you for joining me on this dissection of one of my favorite Bleak Books. I hope to see you again sometime soon! Please take a look in the Adult Fiction section at the Aurora and Dillsboro Public Libraries for my favorite Bleak Books (including this one!) If you meet me in the library and have any Bleak Books suggestions, please let me know! I’m always looking for a new book to disrupt my life for a couple of weeks.

Dollar-a-Bag Book Sale

Our Dillsboro branch will be holding it’s $1-A-Bag Book Sale from April 16th-17th. You’ll find something for everyone on your list – mysteries, thrillers, romance, classics, westerns, travel, crafts, DIY, DVD’s, audio books, CD’s, children’s books, large print, magazines, cookbooks and much, much more.

OR, if you’re preparing for spring cleaning, pick up some books about home organization and tidiness! Maybe add some fresh, new titles to your collection!

Hours are Friday the 16th from 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM and Saturday the 17th from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM.  Shop early and often. New books are continuously being added to the selection.

Become a Citizen Scientist for Earth Day!

Have you heard the term “Citizen Scientist”? A citizen scientist is an ordinary person, just like you, who observes, or measures, or identifies and who sends the information to actual scientists doing research around the world. Become a citizen scientist and help support your community for Earth Day by taking part in our tree-planting program! It’s simple and easy to do!

Children ages 3-8 can pick up a coloring sheet from the Citizen Science displays at the Dillsboro or Aurora Public Libraries and color a beautiful Earth Day scene. Once finished, write your name in the space provided and email a picture of your finished coloring sheet to hello@BlueDotKidsPress.com AND stephanie@eapld.org by April 26th and One Tree Planted will plant a tree for you! Children ages 9 and up can take a photo of a tree in your neighborhood an upload the picture to the free Tree Snap App. Email your photo to hello@BlueDotKidsPress.com AND stephanie@eapld.org by April 26th and One Tree Planted will plant a tree for you!

Pick up a book on our Citizen Science displays to read about trees and Earth Day to gain some Citizen Scientist skills! You can also scan the QR codes on the display to learn about more citizen science opportunities.

 

“Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement” Program

Are you a Jazz aficionado, or are you interested in learning more about this uniquely American form of music? Here’s your chance to learn not only about how Jazz evolved, but about the contributions of jazz musicians during the Civil Rights Movement. Join us on Zoom for this virtual program on Thursday, February 18th at 6:30 PM.

Galen Abdur-Razzaq is a master flute player who has performed around the U.S. sharing both his love of jazz and his knowledge of how this art form became an integral part of American culture. During the program, Galen will be performing and discussing the contributions of jazz musicians in the struggle for equal rights.

Because this program will be presented using Zoom, it’s necessary for each person to register in advance. A Zoom invitation will be sent to your email a few days prior to the performance. If you are not familiar with Zoom, feel free to call the Library and ask for Peggy. I’ll be happy to talk you through it or even do a practice session for you. You can Zoom from a computer, tablet, or smart-phone.

Spread the word and invite your friends to join also! There’s no limit on audience size. Just call 812-926-0646 to register and provide an email address for the invitation.

 

You can preview some of Galen’s music at: https://flutejuice.net/downloads

Galen Abdur-Razzaq

State and Federal Tax Forms

Yes, it’s that time of year again! We know you may be eager to get a tax refund, and we’re happy to help you find the forms you need.

The Library District has not yet received the 2020 Federal tax forms from the IRS. As soon as they are received, we’ll make the forms available at both branches. Meanwhile, you can download the federal forms you need from the IRS web page.  This webpage lists every single IRS form or publication, so you will need to type 1040 into the “FIND” box to navigate to the most commonly used forms for individuals. You’ll see both the 1040 form and the much longer 1040 Instruction Booklet.

The State of Indiana will not be mailing copies of the 2020 tax forms to individuals or to public libraries. You may download and print your Indiana tax forms here. We have one copy of the instruction booklet at each branch library and can also print any forms you need.

If you want to use one of the Library’s public computers to print forms or to file your taxes, remember you will need either a Library card or a photo ID to use the computer. Printing will cost you $0.10 per page for a black and white copy.

Please keep in mind that the Library staff is unable to offer any tax advice. You will need to be able to tell us which forms you want to have printed.

 

Local History Library

The Local History Library of the Aurora Public Library District will be open by appointment only during January 2021. This is to allow for some reorganization that will allow the staff to better serve the needs of the Library community.

To request an appointment time to use the Local History Library, please call 812-926-0646. We will do our best to accommodate your schedule. Meanwhile, you may continue to use Ancestry.com from a public computer at either the Aurora Public Library or the Dillsboro Public Library. Heritage Quest and Newspaper Archive are available to use from any computer.

January Take It – Make It Craft

We may not have snow on the ground, but at the Aurora Public Library District we are still hoping for snow and we’re reading books about snow! Stephanie has prepared a Take It – Make It craft for January, so you can have some snow fun, too. Just stop by the Aurora Public Library or the Dillsboro Public Library to pick up your craft kit to complete at home. While you’re in the Library, be sure to pick up some winter books to read!

Once your craft has been completed, you can email Stephanie at stephanie@eapld.org if you would like your picture to be shown on the Library’s social media page. Make sure to mention in the email that it’s OK to share your craft.

We love seeing all of your craft projects!