Off The Shelves

New in Non-Fiction

Maybe you’ve noticed that we’ve been adding a lot of new non-fiction books to our collection lately. The role of non-fiction books in public libraries has evolved in the past thirty years, with fewer people using print reference books, but with many people still reading popular non-fiction for pleasure or in support of a hobby. We try to purchase books from a variety of viewpoints (politics, anyone?) and buy many of the books on current best-seller lists. We are always open to suggestions, so don’t be shy about making recommendations! If there is a particular area of the collection that you think we need to update, feel free to let us know.

Here’s a sampling of the non-fiction titles currently on the New Shelf at one of our branches. We don’t always buy a copy for each branch, so once you scroll past the images, I’ll explain a way to see the new non-fiction at “the other branch”.

The Weather Machine by Andrew Blum Unfreedom of the Press by Mark R. Levin The Stressed Years of Their Lives by Hibbs and Rostain The Last Pirate of New York by Rich Cohen

The Idle Beekeeper by Bill Anderson The Family Next Door by John Glatt Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz A Tree in the House by Annabelle Hickson

Rough Magic by Lara Prior Palmer Reading Behind Bars by Jill Grunenwald One-Stitch Baby Knits by Val Pierce On the Clock by Emily Guendelsberger

Grow Your Own Herbs by Selsinger and Tucker Gather at the River by various authors Furious Hours by Casey Cep Chaos by Tom O'Neill

Down From the Mountain by Bryce Andrews  Blended Embroidery by Brian Haggard Beneath the Tamarind Sky by Isha Sesay Ballpark by Paul Goldberger

Basic Welding by William Galvery    Songs of America by Meacham and McGraw   Macrame for Home Decor by Samantha Grenier

There are actual two simple ways to search for new items that may not be at your regular branch. First, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame on the right-side of the page, select On-Line Catalog and hit “Go!” without entering a search term. This gets you into the catalog. You should see a tab labeled “New at the Library”. Click on that, and you can scroll through all the items added in the last couple of weeks.

Another method is to use the “Classic Catalog”. Again, starting from the home page (https://eapld.org/), in the Search frame, click on “Looking for the Classic Catalog.” Under the heading Classic Catalog, click on “Submit” without entering a search term. Follow the rest of these steps to locate new non-fiction:

  • Click “Search”.
  • Click on the “New” tab and select a time period in the box called “Received Since”.
  • Click “Set Limits” and scroll through the collection box to find “Non-Fiction.”
  • Select “All Branches”, “Aurora”, or “Dillsboro”, and hit “OK”
  • When it takes you back to the orange “New” screen, just click on “Search”
  • You should have a list of the newest Non-Fiction items at your chosen branch.

Happy Reading!

Rainy Day Reads

April showers brought the May flowers, but it’s been pretty rainy still. With the weather as fickle as it’s been, I don’t want to leave my driveway. With OverDrive, it’s possible to lounge around my house all day without ever running out of things to read, watch, or listen to.

Here are some just-added items from the Indiana Digital Download Center:

Compulsion by Martina Boone

The Dysasters by P.C. Cast and Kristin Cast

Captive Heart by Glynnis Campbell

Rage Becomes Her by Soraya Chemaly

Boy Erased by Garrard Conley

The Spy and the Traitor by Ben Macintyre

Two Can Keep a Secret by Karen M. McManus

Come Find Me by Megan Miranda

A Sucky Love Story by Brittani Louise Taylor

The Year We Left Home by Jean Thompson

Watch Us Rise by Renée Watson and Ellen Hagan

The Silent Invader by Thomas Wood

Place these upcoming releases on hold to read in your blanket fort!

Dead Man’s Mistress by David Housewright

Two Weeks by Karen Kingsbury

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire

Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan

The Peacock Emporium by Jojo Moyes

Tightrope by Amanda Quick

The Five by Hallie Rubenhold

Neon Prey by John Sandford

Emily Eternal by M.G. Wheaton

So many books, so little time! Do you have a go-to rainy day read? My favorite might have to be Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë if only for the opening paragraphs:

“There was no possibility of taking a walk that day. We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question.

I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed.”

Happy Reading!

Poets that Changed Me

As a young woman on the cusp of learning who she really is, Rupi and Amanda have both guided me on that journey. Some people say words have the power to change you, and I agree. Rupi and Amanda both write beautiful poetry meant to inspire and strengthen women to become better versions of ourselves. Their poetry is unique and beautiful and they both touch my heart.

Written By: Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur self-published her debut, Milk and Honey. The book has sold more than 2.5 million copies worldwide since its re-release. From poems of love and heartbreak, to poems of womanhood and self care, Rupi Kaur sheds light on vital topics for women today. Kaur’s poetry is straightforward without the hassle of agonizing over every complicated word and line. In an article with Rolling Stone magazine, she stated: “I’ve realized, it’s not the exact content that people connect with…People will understand and they’ll feel it because it all just goes back to the human emotion. Sadness looks the same across all cultures, races, and communities. So does happiness and joy.”

 

 

 

 

Written By: Amanda Lovelace

Amanda Lovelace‘s poetry is brutally honest. Her debut novel, The Princess Saves Herself in This One, is a collection of poetry filled with the truth of her pain, her subtle strength, and her quiet resilience. The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One is filled with fire and anger. Both books incorporate women power within them as well as the # MeToo movement. All the books in her series, Women are Some Kind of Magic, take the most recognized female characters-princesses, witches, and mermaids-and retell the narratives to make them empowered.

 

 

 

 

Both Rupi and Amanda capture hearts by weaving beautiful tales with their words. While both women are all about the women empowerment movement, they are both still quite unique and different. Their differences are what makes them great. They both evoke such powerful feelings inside their readers, that my heart either feels heavy reading their poems or light from reading their poems. Overall, the poems all interconnect and weave an incredible tale of the power within women.

 

Picture Credits: Emily the Book Addict

 

 

 

Netflix and Read: You

If you’ve been paying attention to the Netflix world these past few months, you might have heard of a little show called You starring Penn Badgley, Elizabeth Lail, and Shay Mitchell. What you might not have realized (because I didn’t until after the fact) is that it is based off of the novel You by Caroline Kepnes. The novel is available to check out as a digital copy or as a physical copy; follow the link to reserve your spot!

What appears to be a chance meeting for Guinevere Beck in Brooklyn has actually been carefully orchestrated by East Village bookstore owner Joe Goldberg, who had Googled the name on her credit card when she visited his shop. Beck’s social media profiles are all public and tells Joe everything he needs to know without doing much besides scrolling through her posts. Joe begins obsessively taking over Beck’s life by choreographing event after event to make Beck fall into his waiting arms over and over again, and wedging himself so deeply into her life that he becomes her boyfriend. There is no limit to what Joe will do to remove any obstacle standing in his and Beck’s way, even if it means murder.

Reminiscent of Humbert Humbert of Lolita, You will have you darkly rooting for Joe while also being kind of terrified by how easy it is to stalk people (or be stalked!) in today’s world, where lots of your information is readily available with a simple Google search. The Netflix show is equally creepy, if not more so because Joe’s actions are placed directly in front of your eyeballs.

Psychological thriller fans (and anyone who uses social media) will love being creeped out by this duology by Caroline Kepnes. Be sure to look for the second book, Hidden Bodies, which continues Joe’s story.

Happy Reading (and Watching)!

Quick Reads

I thought I knew what being busy meant, but then I had a baby in December, and life is definitely not the same! Maybe you like to read but you don’t like the commitment of a series or a 400-page book. Or maybe you are too busy to pay complete attention to a book for too long. Since I’m trying to get back into the groove of reading regularly again (besides fantasizing about what sleep used to be like), I thought that I would compile a list of quick reads to get started.

The majority of these books have 200 pages or less and all are designed to keep your attention from the very beginning. You could also try reading plays or poetry to pad your reading belt or to try something new.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Teen Idol by Meg Cabot

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

If I Stay by Gayle Forman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks

Sunburn by Laura Lippman

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Only Child by Rhiannon Navin

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupéry

Night by Elie Wiesel

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Many of these books are considered Young Adult. If this is a genre you have never read before, you’re definitely missing out! I’m kind of a slow reader anyway, but Young Adult fiction tends to move quickly and has language that is easy to follow. The next time you’re here, browse the Teen section of the library or ask a staff member to help you find your next great read.

Do you have your own suggestions of quick, attention-hogging reads? I’d love to hear them!

Happy Reading!

Urban Fantasy on OverDrive

If you use OverDrive with any regularity, you might have noticed that the featured books that scroll on the homepage change all the time. Right now, the featured books fit into Urban Fantasy, a subgenre of Fantasy.

Sometimes people hear the word “fantasy” and run in the opposite direction; it can be hard to imagine entire worlds and creatures beyond what our world is already filled with. Urban Fantasy happens in the real world with magical elements and creatures added, usually blending in with regular humans. While this genre is super popular with children and teens (think Harry Potter and Isabella Swan), there are plenty of adult titles for those of us who still choose to believe that anything is possible.

Here are a few of the titles that are featured on OverDrive:

Kim Harrison’s The Hollows series takes place in Cincinnati and features bounty hunter Rachel Morgan, a witch whose job is to make sure the vampires all get along.

Patricia Briggs’s Mercy Thompson series features the namesake, a mechanic who also has the ability to shapeshift into a coyote with neighbors ranging from a gremlin to a werewolf.

Kevin Hearne’s The Iron Druid Chronicles features Atticus O’Sullivan, the last of the Druids who runs a bookshop and shapeshifts in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound.

Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files series follows wizard Harry Dresden as he works for the Chicago Police Department, catching all things paranormal.

Karen Marie Moning’s Fever series is about MacKayla — Mac for short — who is a seer of the Fae trying to solve her sister’s murder.

Chloe Neill’s Chicagoland Vampires series follows Merit, a former graduate student turned vampire who has to navigate the treacherous Chicago nightlife.

(And that’s just to page three of the featured books!) Chock-full of action and intrigue, these books will hook you and won’t let you put them down.

If you’re a fan of fantasy and the impossible with likable, realistic characters, then give Urban Fantasy a try! You can download any of these books to any device to read anywhere without the bulk of a physical book. All you need is an Internet connection (which you can use for free at any of our branches), the OverDrive app, your library card, and your pin number. If you’re unsure what your pin is or if you’ve never set one up before, stop by and see us and or give us a call. We can also walk you through downloading digital titles at the desk if you bring your device in.

Don’t forget about downloading the Libby app! Libby will put all of your library cards, downloads, and holds in one spot for your convenience. Ask us how!

Happy Reading!

April Poet Birthdays

April is National Poetry Month.  

Here are a few famous poets who have April birthdays: 

 

Dr. Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou Quote

Poet, singer, author and civil rights activist Dr.Maya Angelou was born on April 4, 1928.  Angelou received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama in 2010.

The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou by Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou Poems

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth Quote

English poet William Wordsworth was born on April 7, 1770.  Wordsworth helped to launch the “Romantic Age” of English literature.

Poems by William Wordsworth.  A selection edited by Edward Dowden.

Poems by William Wordsworth. A selection edited by Edward Dowden

 

Seamus Heaney

Seamus Heaney

Irish born playwright, poet and author Seamus Heaney was born on April 13, 1939.  Heaney won the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Station Island by Seamus Heaney

Station Island by Seamus Heaney

 

 

Etheridge Knight

Etheridge Knight

American Poet Etheridge Knight was born on April 18, 1931.

The Essential Etheridge Knight by Etheridge Knight

The Essential Etheridge Knight

 

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

Playwright and Poet William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564.

No Fear Shakespeare Sonnets

William Shakespeare Sonnets

 

Robert Penn Warren

Robert Penn Warren

Poet, novelist and literary critic Robert Penn Warren was born on April 24, 1905. Warren won Pulitzer prizes for his poetry and for his fiction writing.  

The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren

The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren P

 

Ted Kooser

Ted Kooser Quote

American Poet Ted Kooser was born April 25,1939.

House Held Up By Trees by Ted Kooser

House Held Up By Trees by Ted Kooser

 

Do you share an April birthday with one of these poets?  We’d love to hear in the comments below.

Happy Reading! 🙂

April is National Poetry Month

National Poetry month began in 1996.  Today it is considered “the largest literary celebration in the world” according to the Academy of American Poets website.

Here are a few ideas of how to celebrate National Poetry month:

  • Consider joining the Academy of American Poets “Poem a Day digital series.”    During the week, new and unpublished poems by current poets will arrive in your email.  On weekends  you will find classic poetry. This is a free service.
  • Check out the Academy of American Poets youtube channel.  The channel offers many poems to choose from.  Most of them are read by the authors themselves.   
  • Consider reading a poem a day each day for the month of April.  There are some great authors to help you get started.  

Where the Sidewalk Ends 

by Shel Silverstein

Where the Sidewalk EndsSilverstein opens this childhood classic with an invitation. “If you are a dreamer, come in, If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar, a hop-er, a prayer-er, a magic bean buyer..If you’re a pretender, come sit by my fire for we have some flax-golden tales to spin.  Come in! Come in”

The book is a collection of Silverstein’s poetry and drawings.

It’s Raining Pigs and Noodles

By Jack Prelutsky

Jack Prelutsky

This is a hilarious collection of Prelutsky’s poetry that children will love.  Filled with stories, puns, jokes, and tales of animals and make believe, this will soon become a childhood favorite.

Feel the Beat: Dance poems that zing from salsa to swing

By Marilyn Singer

Feel The Beat

This is a collection of poetry about dance.  There is an audio CD included that features the poet reading to the music for each dance mentioned.

Modern Day Poets:

Many times people think of poetry as being something old fashioned or dead.  Here are three modern day poets who will get you excited to read poetry again.  

Milk and Honey

By Rupi Kur

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur originally self published “Milk and Honey.”  The book had  a huge following and made it to the New York Times best seller list.  Kaur’s poetry talks about pain and how to navigate through life’s toughest moments. This is available as a digital download ebook through OverDrive

Stags Leap

By Sharon Olds

Stags Leap by Sharon Olds

This is a collection of poetry that was written during Olds’ divorce.  In her poems, she tackles issues such as the loss of love, sorrow and finding herself. Olds won the T.S. Elliot award for poetry for this book.   

The Surrender Tree : Poems of Cuba’s struggle for freedom

By Margarita Engle

The Surrender Tree by Margaritta Engle

 

Engle was awarded the  Newbery Honor Award for this book.  This book is a collection of poetry that  chronicles the struggles that Cuba has faced and the country’s continuing fight for freedom.

Do you have a favorite poem or a favorite poet?  We would love to hear in the comments below.

Happy Reading 🙂

The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up

The Netflix series “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo”, released on New Year’s Day, has sparked a revitalization of the “KonMari” method of decluttering. The method is outlined in The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo published in 2014. We have a copy at the Aurora Public Library and on the Digital Download Center. There is also an audiobook, illustrated edition, and a manga about the method on the Digital Download Center.

Simply put, the technique challenges you to pull everything out into the open, divide it into categories, and then decide if it “sparks joy” or not. Everything that does not, you thank for the time you had with it and methodically discard it.

Happy tidying!

March Author Birthdays

Do you share a March Birthday with your favorite Author?  Here is a look at some famous Authors who have birthdays in March.  

Theodor Seuss Geisel better known as “Dr. Seuss was born on March 2, 1904

Dr. Seuss

Dr.  Seuss wrote and illustrated many children’s books some of which are considered the most popular children’s literature.  He wrote over 60 books and saw his books translated into over 20 languages in his lifetime.

The Cat in the Hat

The Cat in the Hat

Green Eggs and Ham

Green Eggs and Ham

Please see the display in children’s section for many of our Dr. Seuss classics.

  Dr. Seuss display

David Murray “Dav” Pilkey Jr was born March 4, 1966. 

Dav Pilkey

Pilkey is the author and illustrator of The Captain Underpants Series which is a character that he created when he was in the second grade.

Pilkey struggled with Dyslexia and ADHD as a child. One of Pilkey’s elementary teachers told him that he could not make a living creating “silly books.”

The Adventures of Captain Underpants

The Adventures of Captain Underpants

Young adult fantasy and science fiction author, Sarah J. Maas was born March 5, 1986.  

Sarah J. Maas

Maas first book was Throne of Glass

Throne of Glass

In Throne of Glass, Eighteen-year-old assassin Celaena Sardothien agrees to compete in a fight to the death battle to gain her freedom.  

Poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning was born March 6, 1806  

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Some of her best known poems are “How Do I Love Thee” and “Aurora Leigh.”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Selected Poems

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Selected Poems

This is a collection of some of Barrett Browning’s best known work.  

Children’s author Lois Lowry was born on March 20, 1937.

Lois Lowry

Lowry’s book The Giver was made into a movie in 2014.  

The GiverThe Giver DVD

Twelve year old Jonas comes to terms with secrets about his seemingly perfect community.  

Author James Patterson was born on March 22, 1947.  He is known for his many thrillers such as the Alex Cross series.   Patterson is the first person to sell 1 million e-books!

James Patterson

Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

This is the book that introduced the world to detective Alex Cross.

Novelist John Irving  was born on March 2, 1942.

John Irving

Irving is also a screenwriter and won an Academy Award in 1999 for Best Adapted Screenplay for The Cider House Rules.

The Cider House Rules The Cider House Rules

Homer Wells has been raised in the orphanage at St Cloud Maine since he was born.  Dr. Wilbur Larch the founder of the orphanage becomes a father figure for Homer.


Children’s author Patricia MacLachlan was born March 3, 1938.  

Patricia Maclachlan

Maclachlan is know for her Newbery Medal winning novel Sarah Plain and Tall.

Sarah Plain and Tall

Children’s author and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats was born March 11, 1916.

Ezra Jack Keats

His novel The Snowy Day is a classic.  The Snowy Day won the Caldecott Medal for illustrating in 1963.

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats  

My favorite March birthday author is novelist and short story southern Gothic writer Flannery O’Connor  who was born on March 25, 1925.  

Fannery O'Connor

  O’Connor’s best known short stories are “Good Country People” and “A Good Man is hard to find.” 

The Complete Stories by Flannery O'Connor

The Complete Stories is a showcase of 31 of O’Connor’s best pieces.

 

Who is your favorite March born Author?  We would love to hear in the comments below.

 

Happy Reading 🙂