The 2019 Summer Reading Program is Here!

Get ready to blast off into A Universe of Stories this summer! The Aurora Public Library District has so much stuff planned for you and your family, from a first person’s living history of life on the Ohio River,weekly Storytimes, StarLab Dome, a tour of the solar system, Daytime Sky Viewing, a Harry Potter Essential Oils class, teen movie nights, cupcake decorating, tween book discussions, and more! Be sure to check the blog, social media, and the newsletter for all of the information about programs.

Stop in anytime on or after May 23 to sign up. Everyone gets a book bag for free, and children eighteen and under will also get a book in their bags to keep. In your bag, you’ll find your summer Tic-Tac-Toe sheet. As you complete three-in-row, you’ll get a prize and also a chance to put your name in for a prize drawing of your choice. On top of that, every time you come into the library, you’ll also get to put your name in for prizes. There will also be door prizes featured at programs this summer, so be sure to come to as many of those as you can!

We can’t wait to see what this summer has in store for everyone! Remember, a some of our programs require advanced registration, so be sure to get your spot early before they’re all gone.

Happy Reading!

The Moon: Craters and Impacts

Have you ever looked at a picture of the Moon and wondered why it has so many craters on it?

 

If you observe the Moon, you will notice that it has more craters than the Earth, which has relatively few.  Have you ever wondered why?

The Earth

If the answers above are yes, please join us for a special “Fun Friday for Families” program on:

 Friday, May 31, 2019, at 10:30 am at the Aurora Public Library.

We will be welcoming Dr. Wesley Ryle, Professor of Astronomy at Thomas More University.  

Dr. Ryle will show us how craters are formed via violent impacts. 

Moon Crater

The program will also include hands-on creations of our own craters.

This is a free event and is open to all agesNo registration is required. 

Hope to see you there!  🙂

 

Books Becoming Movies 2019

2019 is the year for books! There are so many being adapted for the big screen that it’s getting hard to keep track of them all! It’s a book lovers best and worst nightmare! Is the movie going to live up to our expectations of it?! Are the characters going to play the characters right? What if they mess it up?! 

 

Here are just a few of the books coming to the big screen:

 A classic story of unwavering loyalty and incredible devotion, A Dog’s Way Home is a beautifully told, charming tale that explores the unbreakable bond between us and our pets. This fantastic and exhilarating journey of the heart is in the same tradition as the beloved bestseller, A Dog’s Purpose.

A heart-wrenching but deeply funny and ultimately uplifting story of family, love, loyalty, and hope, The Art of Racing in the Rain is a beautifully crafted and captivating look at the wonders and absurdities of human life … as only a dog could tell it.

Wicked is an astonishingly rich re-creation of the land of Oz, this book retells the story of Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, who wasn’t so wicked after all. Taking readers past the yellow brick road and into a phantasmagorical world rich with imagination and allegory, Gregory Maguire just might change the reputation of one of the most sinister characters in literature.

Where’d You Go Bernadette is an ingenious and unabashedly entertaining novel about a family coming to terms with who they are and the power of a daughter’s love for her mother.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller: The Woman in the Window, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

 

There’s so many I can’t fit them all into this list! What book adaptation are you excited for? What adaptation do you wish they would do? Let us know in the comments!

Carpe Librum!

“With Every Good Wish,” Save the Date!

The Aurora Public Library District Board of Directors and staff would like to cordially invite you to attend a statue dedication ceremony in honor of longtime Director Mary Alice Horton. Please join us at the Aurora Public Library’s lower level entrance on Saturday, June 1 at 1 p.m. for the statue’s unveiling. Executive Director of Main Street Aurora Nancy Turner will be speaking.

Mary Alice was the Director of the Aurora Public Library District for 35 years, from 1982 to 2017. Under her administration, the Library expanded to include the additions of the East and West Wings at the Aurora Public Library, the acquisition and absorption of the Dillsboro Public Library and building, and the purchase of the old train depot to house the Local History Library @ the Depot. She was extremely involved in the community, participating in various community events over the years while promoting the Library. Chances are, if you lived in Aurora or Dillsboro, you knew Mary Alice.

“Mary Alice’s love and passion for the Aurora Library and its patrons and her town are evident throughout our community, and will be for years to come.  It is under her leadership and dream that we have this great library to provide life-long learning for all.” ~Rose T.

 

The statue has been commissioned from the Randolph Rose Collection, which is the same designer of the statues featured near the entrances of both the Aurora and Dillsboro branches. The statue will be installed and uncovered on Saturday, June 1 at 1 p.m. The public is invited to attend the unveiling ceremony followed by a butterfly release.

Rainy Day Reads

April showers brought the May flowers, but it’s been pretty rainy still. With the weather as fickle as it’s been, I don’t want to leave my driveway. With OverDrive, it’s possible to lounge around my house all day without ever running out of things to read, watch, or listen to.

Here are some just-added items from the Indiana Digital Download Center:

Compulsion by Martina Boone

The Dysasters by P.C. Cast and Kristin Cast

Captive Heart by Glynnis Campbell

Rage Becomes Her by Soraya Chemaly

Boy Erased by Garrard Conley

The Spy and the Traitor by Ben Macintyre

Two Can Keep a Secret by Karen M. McManus

Come Find Me by Megan Miranda

A Sucky Love Story by Brittani Louise Taylor

The Year We Left Home by Jean Thompson

Watch Us Rise by Renée Watson and Ellen Hagan

The Silent Invader by Thomas Wood

Place these upcoming releases on hold to read in your blanket fort!

Dead Man’s Mistress by David Housewright

Two Weeks by Karen Kingsbury

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire

Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan

The Peacock Emporium by Jojo Moyes

Tightrope by Amanda Quick

The Five by Hallie Rubenhold

Neon Prey by John Sandford

Emily Eternal by M.G. Wheaton

So many books, so little time! Do you have a go-to rainy day read? My favorite might have to be Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë if only for the opening paragraphs:

“There was no possibility of taking a walk that day. We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question.

I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed.”

Happy Reading!

You Are Invited

In 2004, the Aurora Public Library District launched its “Talk About Aurora History” series under the late Director Mary Alice Horton.  Talk About Aurora History is a roundtable discussion held at the District’s Local History Library @ The Depot.  For the last fifteen years, Roy Lambert, local history librarian, has been the one who prepares and conducts each talk.  Various topics have been discussed, including churches, doctors, schools, ferries, businesses, wars, caves, and the Underground Railroad.  This is an interesting event for those who are local history buffs and is also helpful to those new to the community searching for details of their new home town.  The 2019 program on May 28 will be a milestone for Mr. Lambert.  On this date, he will present his 100th program.  The Talk About Aurora History series has been extraordinarily successful through the years due to Mr. Lambert’s knowledge of his home town.

You are cordially invited to our 100th celebration of Talk About Aurora History.  The celebration will be Tuesday, May 28th at 6:00 PM.  The Library is relocating this Talk to The Aurora Lions Club Building due to the number of guests expected.  Refreshments will be provided.  Roy’s topic this month will be “Lower Second Street:  The Tim Miller Building Renovation“.  Please come early to ensure a good seat!  Parking is located behind the Lions’ building.  See you there.

Continued success, Roy!

Poets that Changed Me

As a young woman on the cusp of learning who she really is, Rupi and Amanda have both guided me on that journey. Some people say words have the power to change you, and I agree. Rupi and Amanda both write beautiful poetry meant to inspire and strengthen women to become better versions of ourselves. Their poetry is unique and beautiful and they both touch my heart.

Written By: Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur self-published her debut, Milk and Honey. The book has sold more than 2.5 million copies worldwide since its re-release. From poems of love and heartbreak, to poems of womanhood and self care, Rupi Kaur sheds light on vital topics for women today. Kaur’s poetry is straightforward without the hassle of agonizing over every complicated word and line. In an article with Rolling Stone magazine, she stated: “I’ve realized, it’s not the exact content that people connect with…People will understand and they’ll feel it because it all just goes back to the human emotion. Sadness looks the same across all cultures, races, and communities. So does happiness and joy.”

 

 

 

 

Written By: Amanda Lovelace

Amanda Lovelace‘s poetry is brutally honest. Her debut novel, The Princess Saves Herself in This One, is a collection of poetry filled with the truth of her pain, her subtle strength, and her quiet resilience. The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One is filled with fire and anger. Both books incorporate women power within them as well as the # MeToo movement. All the books in her series, Women are Some Kind of Magic, take the most recognized female characters-princesses, witches, and mermaids-and retell the narratives to make them empowered.

 

 

 

 

Both Rupi and Amanda capture hearts by weaving beautiful tales with their words. While both women are all about the women empowerment movement, they are both still quite unique and different. Their differences are what makes them great. They both evoke such powerful feelings inside their readers, that my heart either feels heavy reading their poems or light from reading their poems. Overall, the poems all interconnect and weave an incredible tale of the power within women.

 

Picture Credits: Emily the Book Addict

 

 

 

Netflix and Read: You

If you’ve been paying attention to the Netflix world these past few months, you might have heard of a little show called You starring Penn Badgley, Elizabeth Lail, and Shay Mitchell. What you might not have realized (because I didn’t until after the fact) is that it is based off of the novel You by Caroline Kepnes. The novel is available to check out as a digital copy or as a physical copy; follow the link to reserve your spot!

What appears to be a chance meeting for Guinevere Beck in Brooklyn has actually been carefully orchestrated by East Village bookstore owner Joe Goldberg, who had Googled the name on her credit card when she visited his shop. Beck’s social media profiles are all public and tells Joe everything he needs to know without doing much besides scrolling through her posts. Joe begins obsessively taking over Beck’s life by choreographing event after event to make Beck fall into his waiting arms over and over again, and wedging himself so deeply into her life that he becomes her boyfriend. There is no limit to what Joe will do to remove any obstacle standing in his and Beck’s way, even if it means murder.

Reminiscent of Humbert Humbert of Lolita, You will have you darkly rooting for Joe while also being kind of terrified by how easy it is to stalk people (or be stalked!) in today’s world, where lots of your information is readily available with a simple Google search. The Netflix show is equally creepy, if not more so because Joe’s actions are placed directly in front of your eyeballs.

Psychological thriller fans (and anyone who uses social media) will love being creeped out by this duology by Caroline Kepnes. Be sure to look for the second book, Hidden Bodies, which continues Joe’s story.

Happy Reading (and Watching)!

Aurora Pvblic Library?

As you walk up the steps to the Aurora Public Library, have you ever looked above the door?

Aurora Public Library 414 Second Street Aurora Indiana

Does anything seem odd about the engraving in the cement at the top of the door?

Aurora Public Library

Lets take an even closer look.

Aurora Public Library

It seems as though the engraver misspelled “Public.”  But did he?

Aurora Public Library

I have walked through those doors many times over the past 18 years that I have lived in the community.  I have never paid much attention to the lettering style or the odd misspelling.  It was only when a gentleman visiting our community from out of town pointed it out to me that I noticed it.  He asked me “Is there a reason that they used a v instead of a u in the word Public on the building?”  This was a new question for me.  I asked a colleague who also had no idea of the answer.  I searched through the history we know about the building.  The lettering was not mentioned.  So this sent me off on a google search of just why this seemed to be misspelled.

This is what I learned: 

It was very common in public buildings erected during the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century to use the Latin alphabet and  lettering style.

This was especially true of buildings that had Roman features.  

The Latin alphabet only has 23 letters.  

In the Latin alphabet U and V are used interchangeably.

 

It’s great to learn something new!