Manga Mania

While manga and comic books occasionally get categorized together, they aren’t the same. Manga are comics or graphic novels created in Japan that conform to a style the Japanese developed in the late 19th century. They are read right to left instead of left to right. While comic books have their own loyal fan-base, so do manga. More popular with young adults than adults, manga can cover a host of genres such as romance, action, drama, fantasy, and so much more.

Stop by and check out the manga in our teen ‘graphic novel’ area and browse through the display of manga we have up!

Want to read one that we don’t have? You have two options: if the manga is older than 6 months, you can inter-library loan it (borrow it from another library in Indiana for free) or if the title is newer than 6 months you can ask to place it as a collection request (a database of titles that we consider to buy for patrons).

Cinderella, which one are you?

Who doesn’t like fairy tales? Thanks to Disney, most children know at least one or two fairy tales! Disney often begins with a traditional story and edits it to tell a different version. The same can be said about children’s fairy tale books. Many authors have chosen to rewrite fairy tales in their own unique and creative way. These retellings are often referred to as “fractured fairy tales”.  Whether it’s Cinderella, Thumbelina, or Rapunzel, we have many versions you will enjoy sharing with your favorite children!

Cinderella is probably the most popular retelling with so many different versions.

 

Cinderella, the Dog, and her Little Glass Slipper    Smoky Mountain Rose by Alan Schroeder

 

Notice Any Changes?

In the last few weeks,  changes have been made to the Aurora Branch’s collection. For quite some time, we’ve had issues with crowded shelves. This creates issues  when you search for your next great read. No one wants  to grab one book from the shelf, only for two or three to come out with it. Now, you don’t have to worry about the crowded shelves! We’ve rearranged many areas in the library to make it more user-friendly for everyone. Most of the changes have taken effect on the upper level.

Instead of now beginning our upstairs nonfiction collection at 590, we now begin our upstairs nonfiction at 600, located in the main room where our biography collection was housed near the top of the stairs. The nonfiction on the upper level wraps around the shelves until reaching the “New Book” area and then continues into the West Wing until it ends. This change was to simplify the nonfiction collection.

Teens have been moved to a whole new area. They are no longer in the East Wing near the elevator. They’ve been moved to the West Wing behind the magazine section. This is to give teens a more  private area. We have more changes in store for the teen area that will hopefully be taking effect in the coming months.

The adult fiction collection has grown. There will be more space on the shelves for new books and the shelves will be less crowded. (James Patterson, we’re looking at you!)

Basically, all these changes create more space on the shelves for more books, reduce overcrowded areas, and make the collection more user-friendly. While it will take some time getting used to the new locations of your favorite authors, eventually, it’ll be as if they’ve been there this whole time!

If you are having trouble locating an item, please seek assistance at the desk!

 

Digital Spotlight: The Lady Sherlock Holmes

USA Today Bestselling Author, Sherry Thomas turns the classic, Sherlock Holmes, upside down and creates a story that’s never been told before! Charlotte Holmes investigates crimes in Victorian London with the help of Mrs. Watson, a female benefactor and a handsome gentleman.

Book 1 of The Lady Sherlock Series

With her inquisitive mind, Charlotte Holmes has never felt comfortable with the demureness expected of the fairer sex in upper class society. But even she never thought that she would become a social pariah, an outcast fending for herself on the mean streets of London.

When the city is struck by a trio of unexpected deaths and suspicion falls on her sister and her father, Charlotte is desperate to find the true culprits and clear the family name. She’ll have help from friends new and old—a kind-hearted widow, a police inspector, and a man who has long loved her.

But in the end, it will be up to Charlotte, under the assumed name Sherlock Holmes, to challenge society’s expectations and match wits against an unseen mastermind.

 

Praise for The Lady Sherlock Series:

“These books, which recast Sherlock Holmes as Charlotte Holmes, are perfect for those who adore layered stories. Unignorable questions of gender, expectation and privilege lurk beneath complex mysteries and a slowly scorching romance.” – The Washington Post

“Fast-paced storytelling and witty prose add further appeal for those who like their historical mysteries playful.” – Publishers Weekly

“Thoughtful yet brief remarks critique patriarchy, heteronormativity, and colonialism, fitting organically into an absorbing whodunwhat arc. An exciting addition to the mystery series; Holmes meets Oceans 11 meets A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.” – Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

The first three in The Lady Sherlock Series can be found in the Digital Library.

 

Stuck Between the Pages Final Meeting

The YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will have it’s final meeting on November 12, 2019 at 6pm. We will be discussing the book: Pay it Forward by: Catherine Ryan Hyde and its movie adaptation that we will be watching on November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. While we have been happy to see young adults enjoying the book club, we do not have enough interest to continue the book discussion group for next year.

About the Book:

The story of how a boy who believed in the goodness of human nature set out to change the world.

Pay It Forward is a wondrous and moving novel about Trevor McKinney, a twelve-year-old boy in a small California town who accepts the challenge that his teacher gives his class, a chance to earn extra credit by coming up with a plan to change the world for the better — and to put that plan into action.

The idea that Trevor comes up with is so simple and so naïve that when others learn of it they are dismissive. Even Trevor himself begins to doubt when his “pay it forward” plan seems to founder on a combination of bad luck and the worst of human nature.

In the end, Pay It Forward is the story of seemingly ordinary people made extraordinary by the simple faith of a child. In the tradition of the successful and inspirational television show Touched by an Angel, and the phenomenally successful novel and film Forrest GumpPay It Forward is a work of charm, wit, and remarkable inspiration, a story of hope for today and for many tomorrows to come.

 

 

Unicorns, Unicorns, and More Unicorns

Unicorns….what’s not to love about unicorns? Children everywhere are falling in love with them, and many children’s authors and illustrators are picking up on the trend. More and more books are coming out with a unicorn character. Why? Because this gives the author and illustrator a more creative outlet. Unicorns can be anything you want them to be. They can be any color, have any power, do anything you want them to do. That’s why they’re so magical!

The Very Short, Entirely True History of Unicorns  Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima

Unicorn Thinks He's Really Great by Bob Shea   Unicorns 101 by Cale Atkinson

Uni's First Sleepover by Amy Krouse Rosenthal  The Midnight Unicorn by Neil Reed

Twelve Dancing Unicorns by Alissa Heyman  Unicorn Day by Diana Murray

How the Crayons Saved the Unicorn by Monica Sweeney  Stories of Unicorns by Rosie Dickins

See a book that caught your eye? Click on the picture and put the book on hold today!

Teen Movie Night: Pay it Forward

The Aurora Public Library District and the YA Book Discussion Group: Stuck Between the Pages will be presenting a movie presentation of Pay it Forward (PG13), the movie adaptation of the SBTP November book selection. The movie presentation will take place on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 5:30pm. There will be refreshments served. You don’t have to be part of the book discussion group to come see this movie!

Seventh grader Trevor (Haley Joel Osment) has every reason to believe that life is harsh and painful. His parents are alcoholics and his father is either absent or abusive. He walks into school every day through a metal detector. Outside his classroom window is an endless expanse of desert. And his mom works two jobs in a city filled with despair, Las Vegas. But then his teacher Eugene (Kevin Spacey) encourages his students to “backflip” the world into something better. He doesn’t expect much — maybe a clean-up of some graffiti. But Trevor decides to do three important favors for people who need them. Then, instead of allowing them to pay it back, he will ask each of them to “pay it forward,” doing three favors for other people, and asking them to do the same. One of Trevor’s favors is to bring his mother Arlene and Eugene together, though it turns out that it’s not just to make them happier. Arlene and Eugene put all of their effort into making sure they don’t get hurt again until they learn that it’s risking hurt that makes us alive.

The movie is PG-13.

Census Application Help Sessions

Looking for a temporary job? Want to earn some extra income? Well, look no further!

The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting thousands of people for temporary jobs across the country. The results of the 2020 Census will  help determine each state’s representation in Congress, as well as how funds are spent for schools, hospitals, library’s, roads, and so much more!

Job Qualifications:

  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Have a valid Social Security number.
  • Be a U.S. Citizen.
  • Have a valid email address.
  • Complete an application and answer assessment questions.
  • Be registered in the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption.
  • Pass a Census-performed criminal background check.
  • Commit to complete training.
  • Be available to work flexible hours, which can include days, evenings, and/or weekends.

Most census jobs require employees to:

  • Have access to a vehicle and a valid driver’s license.
  • Have access to a computer with internet and an email account (to complete training).

If you currently have a job, your current job must be compatible with Census Bureau employment and must not create any conflicts of interest. They will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

2020 Census jobs provide:

  • $15+ per hour
  • Flexible hours
  • Weekly pay
  • Paid training

For more information attend one of two of our Census Application Help Sessions:

Monday, October 28: 10am-1pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

or

Saturday, November 2: 9am-12pm: APL Downstairs (Computer Area)

Census personnel will be on site to answer any and all questions. There will be 3 computers set aside for these help sessions.

It’s Hocus Pocus Time

 

It’s October! You know what that means? It’s Halloween! Time to get spooky! Which in turn means, it’s Hocus Pocus time!

The Aurora Public Library District invites you to join us in a spooky viewing of the beloved Halloween classic: Hocus Pocus! This movie event is for all ages and will take place on October 29th, 2019 at 6pm. There will be some Halloween-themed goody bags, popcorn, and drinks!

If we don’t see you here…we’ll put a spell on you!!

 

 

Libby: One Tap App

The power of an app is almighty. However, if the app is too complicated to use, more likely than not, we’ll delete it. There are thousands of apps for social media, a million for gaming, and hundreds for reading. While Overdrive was the original reading app for the Aurora Public Library digital library patrons to use, we’ve been introduced to a new app called Libby, which was created by the same company that created Overdrive.

Libby is a simple to use reading app. While Overdrive has many tabs you have to click to do one simple thing, Libby is a one tap app. Once you download Libby, and login using your library card number and pin, you can start looking for titles on the very next page. Libby takes away several steps that Overdrive has and simplifies it. You can do so many amazing things with Libby!

You can add more than one library card.

You can listen to audiobooks at your own pace.

You can adjust your reading settings (font, size, space).

You can filter your Preferences to see books for specific age groups (kids, teens, adults).

You can borrow eBooks from our library and send them to your kindle!

You can change the lending period on the titles you borrow.

You can borrow magazines, eBooks, and audio books as well as videos!

The only downfall to Libby? She’s not available on as many devices as Overdrive is. Libby is only available on google Play, Apple Store, and Microsoft store. However, the creators of the app are working diligently to make Libby more compatible with other devices as well. Don’t worry though, you can set Libby to send eBooks to your kindle and still be able to read on your kindle!