Donating Used Books

I know how hard it is to say “Goodbye” to a book that you’ve enjoyed. And yet, there are always times when our personal libraries need to be pared down. When that happens, the Aurora Public Library District is happy to accept donations of your gently used books. As we receive donations, a staff member looks through the items to see if  any items should be added to our collection. Other items are sent to the used book sale at the Dillsboro Public Library, if they are in good condition.

There are some items that we do not accept. We have a limited amount of space and these items can not be sold:

  • Old encyclopedias
  • Textbooks
  • VHS tapes
  • Anything dirty, moldy, or with mildew or bugs.

Just keep in mind that if you wouldn’t want to read it, probably other people feel the same way. Older non-fiction is also not a good thing to donate. We just don’t want our book sale customers to get bad information. The best-selling items in our book sale are children’s books and adult books by popular authors.

We are happy to give you a receipt stating how many bags or boxes of items you donated, but we cannot put a value on the donation.

If you have multiple boxes of items to donate, consider taking them directly to the Dillsboro Public Library, if possible. Otherwise, we have to re-box them to send out to Dillsboro.

Thanks for letting us pass your used books on to other readers! The next $1 per bag sale will be on Friday, November 20th and Saturday, November 21st.

 

 

The #BigLibraryRead with Overdrive and Libby!

Check out November’s Big Library Read! This virtual book club run by Overdrive allows thousands of library patrons like you to check out the same e-book at the same time without any holds or wait lists!

This November, join thousands of other Overdrive and Libby users as we read Five Total Strangers by Natalie D. Richards together! This wild, heart-pounding thriller is sure to keep those (virtual) pages turning. So, cozy up with a new book as the weather gets colder and get reading! Use the hashtag #BigLibraryRead on social media for a chance to win Libby swag, a tablet, and signed books by the author!

If you are new to Overdrive or Libby and would like assistance in setting up your account, please contact the Aurora or Dillsboro Public Libraries or speak to a librarian. We’re here to help!

Historical Series for Kids

If you have elementary age children, you probably already know about the “I Survived” series by Lauren Tarshis. These books have been tremendously popular with kids across the country. Each book is told from the perspective of a child in the middle of a disaster or major event. They’re a fun way to pick up some history while enjoying an action-packed story.

I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 by Lauren Tarshis I Survived the Children's Blizzard, 1888 by Lauren Tarshis I Survived the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Lauren Tarshis I Survived the American Revolution, 1776 by Lauren Tarshis

We also have some older series in juvenile fiction that have been very popular in the past.  Books in the “Dear America” series feature girls as the main characters, while the “My Name is America” books feature boys. Christmas After All is set in Indianapolis and is also written by a Hoosier author, so it’s a great choice for our Fall Beanstack Challenge. These series were both published by Scholastic and written by some of the very best children’s authors. They are notable for the diverse ethnicities of the main characters.

I Thought My Soul Would Rise and Fly by Joyce Hansen  Christmas After All by Kathryn Lasky West to a Land of Plenty by Jim Murphy So Far From Home by Barry Denenberg

The Journal of Ben Uchida by Barry Denenberg The Journal of Wong Ming-Chung by Laurence Yep The Journal of Scott Pendleton Collins by Walter Dean Myers The Journal of Joshua Loper by Walter Dean Myers

The Royal Diary series is all girls; nothing here but queens and princesses. The best thing about this series is that it takes you around the world; it’s not just focused on European royalty.

Marie Antoinette, Princess of Versailles by Kathryn Lasky Kaiulani: The People's Princess by Ellen Emerson White Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile by Kristiana Gregory Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess by Carolyn Meyer

All of these books will enrich your child’s knowledge of the world and give them hours of great reading! Series are actually terrific choices for kids. The standard format of many series makes it easier to get immersed in the story, especially for struggling readers. These books may also start an interest in a person or event that can followed up with some non-fiction reading.

Hoosier Book Challenge on Beanstack!

 

Join us for our Hoosier Reading Challenge on Beanstack! Now through December 31st, every time you read or listen to a book by an Indiana author you can track it on the Beanstack app to earn chances to win our prize giveaway! There will be four challenges: ages 0-7, ages 8-13, ages 14-18, and ages 19+. There will be one winner per age group.

How to Sign Up

Account Set-Up Instructions

If you already have a Beanstack account from Summer Reading, skip to the Tracking and Challenge Instructions.

1. Download the Beanstack Tracker app from your app store or visit eapld.beanstack.org.

2. If using a desktop computer, skip to step 6, otherwise tap Let’s Go!

3. Choose the School, Library, or Bookstore option

4. Tap on Find a Site

5. Search for Aurora Public Library. Make sure to select the one in Indiana!

6. Click Sign Up and follow the prompts to create your account and add readers.

* You may add more than one reader to the same account. For example, one account may include a parent and two children, two parents and one child, two adults with no children, etc.

*Parents who do not wish to participate in the challenges should register themselves as Nonreaders and add their children as Readers. This will allow the parent to track their children’s reading, but will not give them the option to track their own.

Tracking and Challenge Instructions

1. Once you are registered, the correct challenge will automatically populate based on the participant’s age. Click or tap on the challenge to join it. Once you join a challenge, you will see all the badges as well as instructions on how to earn them. There are two types of badges.

        a. Logging Badges: These are earned by logging your reading. To log, tap on the + Button and select Reading. Choose the correct Reader or multiple Readers if everyone read together. You can search by the book title, scan the ISBN, or enter the information manually.

        b. Challenge Badges: These two badges are earned at the beginning and end of the challenge. You will automatically earn the first badge when you join the challenge and the second one when you earn all the logging badges.

2. Every time you earn a badge, you will automatically be entered into the prize drawing. The Beanstack app will randomly choose a winner from the entries accumulated over the course of the challenge.

*If you have multiple Readers on the account you can switch between Readers by tapping on the circle in the top right-hand corner.

Please see a staff member if you have any questions or need assistance with the app.

Adult Recommendations

       

Find more adult recommendations here.

Teen Recommendations

      

Find more teen recommendations here.

Juvenile Recommendations

       

Find more juvenile recommendations here.

Children’s Recommendations

            

Find more children’s recommendations here.

 

Fall Reads

Fall is my most favorite time of the year. With the days getting shorter and the temperature getting cooler, there is nothing better than curling up with a good book. The changing colors of the leaves, pumpkin spice lattes, Halloween and Thanksgiving are things that embody fall. My favorite genre to read during this time is mystery/thriller with a little bit of science fiction. Here are some of my recommendations!

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Frankenstein – Mary Shelley

Classic monsters are everywhere during Halloween. Frankenstein is a classic monster but what if the image of Frankenstein was different that what you have been told? Published in 1818, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus follows Victor Frankenstein as he defies the laws of nature and assemble body parts together to make a monster. This is my all time favorite book. At only 200 pages, this is a quick read and is a great start for those who want to read more classics. Mary Shelley’s writing is simplistic and beautiful and she wrote this novel when she was only 18. She is also one of the pioneers of science fiction/horror. Once your finished, watch the 1931 Frankenstein film, starring Boris Karloff and you will be amazed at how many changes there are.

The Mary Shelley Club by Goldy Moldavsky The Mary Shelley Club – Goldy Moldavsky

This was a recent read for me. Being a big fan of Mary Shelley and Frankenstein, I went into this one with pretty high expectations and I was not disappointed. I found this to be a very enjoyable, fast paced read, and I read it in two days. This follows a girl named Rachel Chavez. She loves horror movies and they help her cope with things that she does not wish to remember. She is recruited by the mysterious Mary Shelley Club. This club does very elaborate pranks or what they call “Fear Tests”. Whoever has the scariest prank wins. The pranks escalate into something more deadly.  Think of this one as Gossip Girl meets Scream and I think that this one is perfect for the fall and spooky season.

Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson Truly Devious – Maureen Johnson

I am a sucker for a private school mystery. This story follows a girl named Stevie Bell, who is invited to be apart of Ellingham Academy. The academy was founded by Albert Ellingham, who wanted to make the school a place for bright thinkers, artists and inventors. When his wife and his daughter go missing, the only clue is a letter signed by “Truly Devious”, a mocking riddle that lists different methods of murder. Stevie’s first year at Ellingham starts with one goal in mind, to solve the cold case. This is the first book in this series, the following books continue Stevie’s story. This is a great mystery for Halloween. The other books in the series are The Vanishing Stair, The Hand on the Wall and The Box in the Woods.

 

New Chapter Books by Best-Selling Authors

Adults who love to read are very good at keeping up with the “book news” and knowing when a new book by a favorite author is being published. We often start placing people on the Hold list months before a publication date. Kids are not always as good at letting us know about upcoming books. Here are some of the new books by some very popular authors of chapter books. We try hard to follow the series, but we sometimes miss one, so don’t be shy about letting us know if we need to order something by your favorite writer.

Chris Colfer is the author of the best-selling series Land of Stories. He’s currently on book # 3 of  the Tale of Magic series, also set in the Land of Stories universe. In addition, he had a graphic novel come out at the end of June that tells the origin story of Goldilocks.

A Tale of Sorcery by Chris Colfer 

Kate Dicamillo is a two-time Newbery Medal winner and a former National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. Her latest book surprisingly has a medieval setting and features a goat! The Beatryce Prophecy is also illustrated by Caldecott winner Sophie Blackall. You’ll recognize Brian Selznick as the author of The Invention of Hugh Cabret (also a great movie) and Wonderstruck. Kaleidoscope is probably best for older kids as the collection of related short stories is described as drifting through genres, time, and even space (Booklist).

The Beatryce Prophecy by Kate DiCamillo Kaleidoscope by Brian Selznick

Gordon Korman is the author of over 80 books for children and teens. Linked tackles the subject of prejudice when a swastika is painted on a school wall. Jerry Spinelli is another perennial favorite. On Dead Wednesday, every eighth grader in Amber Springs is assigned the name and identity of a teenager who died a preventable death in the past year. The kids don black shirts and for the whole day everyone in town pretends they’re invisible–as if they weren’t even there. The adults think it will make them contemplate their mortality. The kids know it’s a free pass to get away with anything.

Linked by Gordon Korman Dead Wednesday by Jerry Spinelli

Who are your favorite children’s authors? Let us know what book you are eagerly anticipating!

The Men of Amish Fiction

Throughout the day, Librarians are asked numerous questions. Some we are able to answer right off the bat, and some take a little more time and research; rarely are we stumped. But stumped I was the other day when a patron asked “Do you have any Amish fiction books that are written by male authors?” Amish fiction has become quite popular as of late, and I am very used to leading people in the direction of popular  Amish fiction authors such as Wanda Brunstetter, Mindy Starns Clark, and  Beverly Lewis. I had to stop and think; do I even know of any male Amish authors?! After a little bit of digging and research, I was able to find eight authors!

  1. Willard Carpenter
  2. Patrick E. Craig
  3. Jerry Eicher
  4. Paul L. Gaus/P.L. Gaus
  5. David G. Lewis (married to and co-writes with his wife, Beverly Lewis)
  6. Thomas Nye
  7. Murray Pura
  8. Amos Wyse

The Aurora Public Library offers quite a few titles from most of these authors as books and as e-books. And of course we are always happy to help you place an Interlibrary Loan (ILL) on any titles that are not available in our system.

Rebecca's Promise            A Quilt for Jenna           Clouds Without Rain

Whispers of a New Dawn          Child of Mine

 

 

Under the Big Top

Most of you are probably familiar with Sara Gruen’s break-out novel Water for Elephants. It was written in 2006 and turned into a movie in 2011. But have you read any of the other circus books we have in our adult fiction collection? Here’s a quick summary of six circus-related novels, plus one circus memoir.

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

 

When his parents are killed in a traffic accident, Jacob Jankowski hops a train after walking out on his final exams at Cornell, where he had hoped to earn a veterinary degree. The train turns out to be a circus train, and since it’s the Depression, when someone with a vet’s skills can attach himself to a circus if he’s lucky, Jacob soon finds himself involved with the animal acts-specifically with the beautiful young Marlena, the horse rider, and her husband, August.  – from Library Journal

 

 

 

 

 

To Fetch a Thief by Spencer Quinn

 

 

To Fetch a Thief is the third book in Spencer Quinn’s Dog On It mystery series.

  • When the elephant star of a traveling circus goes missing along with her trainer, canine detective Chet and his human partner, Bernie Little, follow the missing elephant’s scent out into the desert, where some dangerous people would prefer that Chet and Bernie disappear. – from the publisher

 

 

 

 

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

 

 

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors.  – from the publisher

 

 

 

Silence is Golden by Jeanne Dams

 

 

This is Book 4 in the Hilda Johansson series by Hoosier author Jeanne Dams.

The time is 1903; the circus is in town (South Bend, Indiana); and Fritz, a friend of Hilda’s younger brother, decides he wants to join up and become a trapeze artist. Then the real trapeze artists, the Stupendous Shaws, disappear. So does Fritz, who eventually turns up hiding in a barn, brutally beaten and claiming that he was abused. To make matters even more confusing, Hilda’s brother, Erik, also vanishes. – from Booklist

 

 

 

The Circus in Winter by Cathy Day

Did you know that many traveling circuses used to winter over in Indiana. Cathy Day’s book The Circus in Winter is a series of interconnected short stories about the performers in one of those circuses.

Drawing on observations made during her own childhood in Peru, Indiana, home of the International Circus Hall of Fame, Day strips away the grease paint and costumes of clowns, elephant trainers, and steel-nerved acrobats to reveal lives as messy as any found in mainstream America. Meticulously researched and graced with a dozen lovely black-and-white historical circus photographs, this is a fun way to explore a slice of Indiana history.

– from Library Journal

 

 

 

The Ladies of the Secret Circus by Constance Sayers

 

 

The Ladies of the Secret Circus shares some of the fantasy aspects of The Night Circus.

Lara Barnes grew up hearing tales of her family’s long-retired circus, and its allure never faded away for her as an adult. After her fiancé goes missing on their wedding day, she is understandably distraught, especially when it seems her mother knows more about the situation than she lets on. As Lara unravels the mystery with the town’s chief of police, she discovers more about her family’s past, including a different, secret circus that remains legendary decades after its last performance. This is recommended for readers who don’t mind genre-bending or who enjoy time-slipping fiction.

– from Booklist

 

Love in the Elephant Tent by Kathleen Cremonesi

 

Finally, a memoir: Cremonesi never set out to join the circus, yet this young woman from Oregon ends up swimming with sharks and riding an ostrich with one of Italy’s most famous circuses, Circo Moira Orfei. Cremonesi’s memoir is saturated with descriptive language and emotion, as she tells the story of how, at 23, she becomes a dancing girl in a traveling circus and falls in love with Stefano, the passionate Italian elefanti caretaker.  – from Booklist

 

It’s Unmentionable, But It’ll Make You Giggle!

Maybe we can blame it all on Captain Underpants, but the latest trend in books for kids seems to be UNDERWEAR! And nothing is more sure to make a group of kids giggle than just saying that word. Here are some of the newest picture books from the “undies” category.

Creepy Pair of Underwear by Aaron Reynolds

 

 

This book by Aaron Reynolds is probably my favorite. It’s perfect for the 4-7 year old crowd, and if you enjoy it, be sure to also check out his book Creepy Carrots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attack of the Underwear Dragon by Scott Rothman

 

 

 

Who doesn’t adore a dragon book? The underwear is just icing on the cake!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monster's New Undies by Tad Carpenter

 

 

Monster searches for a perfect replacement pair of underpants in this book by Tad Carpenter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Something's Wrong by Jory John

 

 

Everyone has an occasional day when things just feel off. Could it be because you’re just wearing your underwear?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Those Are Not My Underpants by Melissa Martin

 

 

Someone has left their underwear hanging near Bear Cub’s house? Which animal will claim the tighty whities?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laughing has been proven to be good for your health, so don’t delay! Go find some kids to share these books with.

Take It, Make It: October

Beginning on Monday, October 4, we will have a brand new Take It, Make It Activity available at both branches! Take It, Make It activities are projects that can be done at home with materials you can pick up at the library!  Stop by the Aurora or Dillsboro Library anytime in October to pick up the supplies to make a spooky ghost or a menacing mummy!