Medicare 101

You may be counting on it, but do you really understand Medicare? What are your benefits? What are Part A vs. Part  B vs. Part C? How much does it cost? The Aurora Public Library District has an opportunity for you to learn more about this important government program!

Chantel Lang will be conducting informational programs for the community at two different times and locations in April. These presentations are not “sales pitches”, but are a chance for you or your family members to learn more about your options, so you can have a better plan for your retirement years. Spread the word to anyone who might be interested, but advance registration is required.

The dates and times for these programs are:Health Care Insurance graphic

Dillsboro Public Library – Saturday April 27th from 11 am – noon

Aurora Public Library – Tuesday, April 30th from 6:30-7:30 pm

You can register to attend one of these programs by calling the library at 812-926-0646.

The Baby Basket

The Aurora Public Library is a proud partner of The Baby Basket ‘Store’. This is a non-profit organization serving families in need of additional resources. The Baby Basket “Store” offers new and gently used clothing for newborn and toddlers up to 36 months and even offers equipment and other supplies needed.

This organization works by eligible participants earning points by using support services. If a participating family attends one of the Aurora Public Library District’s programs, the family will then receive points for attending.  Participants may redeem point for diapers, clothes, or other necessities by shopping at the Baby Basket ‘Store’. Low income families and parents-to-be with children from birth to 36 months may qualify for the program.

The Baby Basket ‘Store’ can be found at 304 Fourth St. Aurora Indiana 47001. Their hours of operation will be from 1-6pm on the second Friday of the month with the exception of inclement weather.

If you would like to help support The Baby Basket, you can help by:

  1. Serve as a volunteer in the organization.
  2. Make a financial donation to help purchase items and supplies.
  3. Sponsor an event (Baby shower, yard sale, raffle) to benefit the Baby Basket.
  4. Donate gently used or new baby or toddler clothing (any sizes from newborn to 4T), high chairs, strollers, swings, pack ‘n plays, etc.
  5. Sign your Kroger Card up for Community Rewards to support the Baby Basket (This doesn’t impact your gas credits.)

If you have any questions, please call 812-926-3000.

Quick Reads

I thought I knew what being busy meant, but then I had a baby in December, and life is definitely not the same! Maybe you like to read but you don’t like the commitment of a series or a 400-page book. Or maybe you are too busy to pay complete attention to a book for too long. Since I’m trying to get back into the groove of reading regularly again (besides fantasizing about what sleep used to be like), I thought that I would compile a list of quick reads to get started.

The majority of these books have 200 pages or less and all are designed to keep your attention from the very beginning. You could also try reading plays or poetry to pad your reading belt or to try something new.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Teen Idol by Meg Cabot

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

If I Stay by Gayle Forman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks

Sunburn by Laura Lippman

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Only Child by Rhiannon Navin

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupéry

Night by Elie Wiesel

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Many of these books are considered Young Adult. If this is a genre you have never read before, you’re definitely missing out! I’m kind of a slow reader anyway, but Young Adult fiction tends to move quickly and has language that is easy to follow. The next time you’re here, browse the Teen section of the library or ask a staff member to help you find your next great read.

Do you have your own suggestions of quick, attention-hogging reads? I’d love to hear them!

Happy Reading!

Gothic Classics

We all love classics. Whether it’s Pride and Prejudice or it’s the Great Gatsby, it doesn’t quite matter. Gothic Classics are the classics that combines fiction,  horror, death, and even romance at times. Here’s a list of some amazing Gothic Classics that you should read if you enjoy horror!

Jane Austen’s first novel—published posthumously in 1818—tells the story of Catherine Morland and her dangerously sweet nature, innocence, and sometime self-delusion. Though Austen’s fallible heroine is repeatedly drawn into scrapes while vacationing at Bath and during her subsequent visit to Northanger Abbey, Catherine eventually triumphs, blossoming into a discerning woman who learns truths about love, life, and the heady power of literature. The satirical novel pokes fun at the Gothic novel while earnestly emphasizing caution to the female sex.-Goodreads

As a fan of Jane Austen, I was surprised to discover this one! I personally haven’t read Northanger Abbey, but even if it is poking fun at the Gothic novels, it is still considered a Gothic classic!

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again . . .

The novel begins in Monte Carlo, where our heroine is swept off her feet by the dashing widower Maxim de Winter and his sudden proposal of marriage. Orphaned and working as a lady’s maid, she can barely believe her luck. It is only when they arrive at his massive country estate that she realizes how large a shadow his late wife will cast over their lives–presenting her with a lingering evil that threatens to destroy their marriage from beyond the grave. –Goodreads

Who hasn’t heard of Daphne Du Maurier?! She is the face of all romantic Gothic classics! So many people prefer Rebecca over all the other classics and if you read it, you’ll discover why!

 

Orphaned as a child, Jane has felt an outcast her whole young life. Her courage is tested once again when she arrives at Thornfield Hall, where she has been hired by the brooding, proud Edward Rochester to care for his ward Adèle. Jane finds herself drawn to his troubled yet kind spirit. She falls in love. Hard.

But there is a terrifying secret inside the gloomy, forbidding Thornfield Hall. Is Rochester hiding from Jane? Will Jane be left heartbroken and exiled once again?-Goodreads

Once again we come across another classic that I didn’t realize would fall into the Gothic classic genre! Though, it has everything needed to be considered a Gothic classic!

Wuthering Heights, first published in 1847, the year before the author’s death at the age of thirty, endures today as perhaps the most powerful and intensely original novel in the English language. The epic story of Catherine and Heathcliff plays out against the dramatic backdrop of the wild English moors, and presents an astonishing metaphysical vision of fate and obsession, passion and revenge. -Goodreads

Another Bronte on the list! I guess they have something in common! Interesting tidbit I wasn’t aware of: this is Emily Bronte‘s only novel.

Enthralled by his own exquisite portrait, Dorian Gray exchanges his soul for eternal youth and beauty. Influenced by his friend Lord Henry Wotton, he is drawn into a corrupt double life, indulging his desires in secret while remaining a gentleman in the eyes of polite society. Only his portrait bears the traces of his decadence. The Picture of Dorian Gray was a succès de scandale. Early readers were shocked by its hints at unspeakable sins, and the book was later used as evidence against Wilde at the Old Bailey in 1895.-Goodreads

Though I’ve never read this book, reading the summary (placed above in italics) makes it go onto my to-be-read shelf!

The scientist Victor Frankenstein, obsessed with possessing the secrets of life, creates a new being from the bodies of the dead. But his creature is a twisted, gruesome parody of a man who, rejected for his monstrous appearance, sets out to destroy his maker.

Mary Shelley‘s chilling Gothic tale, conceived after a nightmare in 1816 when she was only eighteen, became a modern myth. It is a disturbing and dramatic exploration of birth and death, creation and destruction, and one of the most iconic horror stories of all time.-Goodreads

I haven’t read Frankenstein but I knew Mary Shelley‘s story would land her on this list!

First published in 1897, Dracula by Bram Stoker has become the standard against which all other vampire stories are compared and the inspiration for countless film and stage adaptations. Indeed, the name Dracula has been synonymous with the Undead for at least a century, and the original novel still has the power to chill. Come then to Castle Dracula, hidden in the forbidding peaks of the Carpathian Mountains, where an undying creature of evil casts his sights on unsuspecting England. Voyage on the doomed ship Demeter as it carries a monster out of ancient superstition in search of new life and new blood. Tremble as first one woman, then another succumbs to the unholy thirst of the nosferatu, and as a small band of men and women, horrified by the supernatural forces arrayed against them, risk their lives and their very souls to oppose the evil known only as… Dracula.”-Goodreads

As a fan of vampires, I have to say that Bram Stoker‘s story of Dracula is amazing!

A single person—but with two personalities: one that’s noble and kind and another that’s pure, repulsive evil. Robert Louis Stevenson’s engrossing masterpiece about the dual nature of man—and a good doctor whose thirst for knowledge has tragic consequences—serves up all the suspense and satisfying chills one expects from the best horror and science fiction.-Goodreads

This story is amazing and unique in every way! I’m not surprised that this book appears on lists of Gothic classics.

 

All the books listed above are literary masterpieces, which is why they are now known as classics! Though I’ve personally only read a few on this list, I know many people who enjoy them all! They are all available at APLD!

Comment below and let me know what Gothic Classics I missed and which one is your favorite!

 

Carpe Librum!

 

P.S. Thanks to Goodreads for providing the italicized summaries for this blog!

Urban Fantasy on OverDrive

If you use OverDrive with any regularity, you might have noticed that the featured books that scroll on the homepage change all the time. Right now, the featured books fit into Urban Fantasy, a subgenre of Fantasy.

Sometimes people hear the word “fantasy” and run in the opposite direction; it can be hard to imagine entire worlds and creatures beyond what our world is already filled with. Urban Fantasy happens in the real world with magical elements and creatures added, usually blending in with regular humans. While this genre is super popular with children and teens (think Harry Potter and Isabella Swan), there are plenty of adult titles for those of us who still choose to believe that anything is possible.

Here are a few of the titles that are featured on OverDrive:

Kim Harrison’s The Hollows series takes place in Cincinnati and features bounty hunter Rachel Morgan, a witch whose job is to make sure the vampires all get along.

Patricia Briggs’s Mercy Thompson series features the namesake, a mechanic who also has the ability to shapeshift into a coyote with neighbors ranging from a gremlin to a werewolf.

Kevin Hearne’s The Iron Druid Chronicles features Atticus O’Sullivan, the last of the Druids who runs a bookshop and shapeshifts in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound.

Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files series follows wizard Harry Dresden as he works for the Chicago Police Department, catching all things paranormal.

Karen Marie Moning’s Fever series is about MacKayla — Mac for short — who is a seer of the Fae trying to solve her sister’s murder.

Chloe Neill’s Chicagoland Vampires series follows Merit, a former graduate student turned vampire who has to navigate the treacherous Chicago nightlife.

(And that’s just to page three of the featured books!) Chock-full of action and intrigue, these books will hook you and won’t let you put them down.

If you’re a fan of fantasy and the impossible with likable, realistic characters, then give Urban Fantasy a try! You can download any of these books to any device to read anywhere without the bulk of a physical book. All you need is an Internet connection (which you can use for free at any of our branches), the OverDrive app, your library card, and your pin number. If you’re unsure what your pin is or if you’ve never set one up before, stop by and see us and or give us a call. We can also walk you through downloading digital titles at the desk if you bring your device in.

Don’t forget about downloading the Libby app! Libby will put all of your library cards, downloads, and holds in one spot for your convenience. Ask us how!

Happy Reading!

Dads and Donuts

Coffee and Donuts

Join us for a morning of fun at the Aurora Public Library!  Children and adult male caregivers can come to the library on Saturday, May 4th from 10:30 a.m. until noon to enjoy donuts, juice, milk, and coffee. In addition to the donuts, there’ll be time to read books together, play games, and make a simple craft.

What’s even sweeter than a donut? Just hanging out together!  Make plans to join us for some great family time.  

There is no registration required for this free event, and this event is open for children up to age 12.

Donut with sprinkles

We hope to see you there!  🙂

National Library Week

It’s here! The week you’ve been waiting for all year! National Library Week is April 7 — 13 this year! Yay!

Libraries are full of so much more than books. Our shelves are full of fiction, nonfiction, picture books, early reading books, juvenile chapter books, teen books, audiobooks, DVDs, magazines, newspapers, and CDs. Our items are simultaneously full of reference and escape at the same time.

You can come in and connect to our WiFi for free, or hop onto one of the public computers to print copies or scan documents to your email. Need to make a copy of something? Find our public copy machine, and don’t be afraid to ask a staff member for help.

Visit our community information centers to learn about events taking place throughout the community. Or sign up for our newsletter either by visiting our website or by stopping by one of the desks to keep up-to-date on all things library-related. You can also like and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, or read more blogs! Learn about upcoming programs and events for all ages and interests. You’ll be the first to know (and sign up!) about all the cool stuff we have planned.

Have you checked out our digital collection yet? You can use your library card and pin number to access the Indiana Digital Download Center, a digital library full of thousands of titles, including videos and audiobooks. If you don’t know what your pin is or haven’t set one up yet, just stop by the desk or give us a call. Then you’ll be able to read on the go with your tablet or smartphone while not worrying about late fees, because when your loan has ended, the item will automatically check itself back in!

The Local History Library @ the Depot contains historical books and documents, yearbooks, newspapers, maps, and more on Aurora, Dillsboro, and the surrounding communities. The staff there would be happy to help you research your house or genealogy, or leave you alone to let you work in the quiet. The Dillsboro Public Library also houses the Local History Room downstairs with even more local history artifacts, photographs, and documents.

Are you looking to stock up your own library? On the third Friday and Saturday of every month, the Dillsboro Public Library promotes its $1 Per Bag sale, where you can visit the Book Sale in the basement and fill up as many bags as you want with items and only pay $1 per bag. But don’t worry if you aren’t able to make it in on the $1 Per Bag weekends; the Book Sale is ongoing during regular library hours. The most you’ll ever pay for any one item is $1.

These are just a few of the services our library offers! I could go on and on about book discussions, bags of books for teachers, the Summer Reading Program, 1000 Books Before Kindergarten and more, but you should really stop in and see for yourself. If you live in our district and have a valid I.D. showing your current address or a piece of metered mail, you will not be discriminated against getting a free library card of your own. You will not be judged on the items you check out or the questions you ask us; we are here to help you and to serve you.

We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for your patronage, and our staff loves to serve you!

Happy Reading, Watching, and Listening! And thank you!

April Poet Birthdays

April is National Poetry Month.  

Here are a few famous poets who have April birthdays: 

 

Dr. Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou Quote

Poet, singer, author and civil rights activist Dr.Maya Angelou was born on April 4, 1928.  Angelou received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama in 2010.

The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou by Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou Poems

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth Quote

English poet William Wordsworth was born on April 7, 1770.  Wordsworth helped to launch the “Romantic Age” of English literature.

Poems by William Wordsworth.  A selection edited by Edward Dowden.

Poems by William Wordsworth. A selection edited by Edward Dowden

 

Seamus Heaney

Seamus Heaney

Irish born playwright, poet and author Seamus Heaney was born on April 13, 1939.  Heaney won the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Station Island by Seamus Heaney

Station Island by Seamus Heaney

 

 

Etheridge Knight

Etheridge Knight

American Poet Etheridge Knight was born on April 18, 1931.

The Essential Etheridge Knight by Etheridge Knight

The Essential Etheridge Knight

 

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

Playwright and Poet William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564.

No Fear Shakespeare Sonnets

William Shakespeare Sonnets

 

Robert Penn Warren

Robert Penn Warren

Poet, novelist and literary critic Robert Penn Warren was born on April 24, 1905. Warren won Pulitzer prizes for his poetry and for his fiction writing.  

The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren

The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren P

 

Ted Kooser

Ted Kooser Quote

American Poet Ted Kooser was born April 25,1939.

House Held Up By Trees by Ted Kooser

House Held Up By Trees by Ted Kooser

 

Do you share an April birthday with one of these poets?  We’d love to hear in the comments below.

Happy Reading! 🙂

April is National Poetry Month

National Poetry month began in 1996.  Today it is considered “the largest literary celebration in the world” according to the Academy of American Poets website.

Here are a few ideas of how to celebrate National Poetry month:

  • Consider joining the Academy of American Poets “Poem a Day digital series.”    During the week, new and unpublished poems by current poets will arrive in your email.  On weekends  you will find classic poetry. This is a free service.
  • Check out the Academy of American Poets youtube channel.  The channel offers many poems to choose from.  Most of them are read by the authors themselves.   
  • Consider reading a poem a day each day for the month of April.  There are some great authors to help you get started.  

Where the Sidewalk Ends 

by Shel Silverstein

Where the Sidewalk EndsSilverstein opens this childhood classic with an invitation. “If you are a dreamer, come in, If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar, a hop-er, a prayer-er, a magic bean buyer..If you’re a pretender, come sit by my fire for we have some flax-golden tales to spin.  Come in! Come in”

The book is a collection of Silverstein’s poetry and drawings.

It’s Raining Pigs and Noodles

By Jack Prelutsky

Jack Prelutsky

This is a hilarious collection of Prelutsky’s poetry that children will love.  Filled with stories, puns, jokes, and tales of animals and make believe, this will soon become a childhood favorite.

Feel the Beat: Dance poems that zing from salsa to swing

By Marilyn Singer

Feel The Beat

This is a collection of poetry about dance.  There is an audio CD included that features the poet reading to the music for each dance mentioned.

Modern Day Poets:

Many times people think of poetry as being something old fashioned or dead.  Here are three modern day poets who will get you excited to read poetry again.  

Milk and Honey

By Rupi Kur

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur originally self published “Milk and Honey.”  The book had  a huge following and made it to the New York Times best seller list.  Kaur’s poetry talks about pain and how to navigate through life’s toughest moments. This is available as a digital download ebook through OverDrive

Stags Leap

By Sharon Olds

Stags Leap by Sharon Olds

This is a collection of poetry that was written during Olds’ divorce.  In her poems, she tackles issues such as the loss of love, sorrow and finding herself. Olds won the T.S. Elliot award for poetry for this book.   

The Surrender Tree : Poems of Cuba’s struggle for freedom

By Margarita Engle

The Surrender Tree by Margaritta Engle

 

Engle was awarded the  Newbery Honor Award for this book.  This book is a collection of poetry that  chronicles the struggles that Cuba has faced and the country’s continuing fight for freedom.

Do you have a favorite poem or a favorite poet?  We would love to hear in the comments below.

Happy Reading 🙂