Marvelous Magazines

The Library has magazines!

While this isn’t anything new, one might not necessarily know that one can check out magazines from the Aurora Public Library District — I’ll admit, magazines aren’t the first materials I think of when I think about the items available to check out. But we do have them, and you can check out up to ten magazines at a time for two weeks, just like a book.

We have all sorts of magazines available, too, from history magazines, DIY magazines, celebrity and entertainment magazines, cooking magazines, science magazines, automobile magazines, animal magazines, magazines for children, health magazines, fiction magazines, news magazines, and so much more! There’s bound to be something to pique your interest!

Magazines are a great way to get the non-reader to read more because they can trick one into reading the articles with their glossy photographs and pages; you might not even realize that you’re reading when you’re casually thumbing through a magazine, just waiting for something to jump out at you. Since the writers of magazine articles have to stick within a strict word count to maintain the layout of the pages, the information is handed to the reader quickly, allowing the reader to jump from article to article as they interest them.

As we are thrown right into the thick of the busy holiday season, magazines are a great way for you to keep reading without consuming much of your time. Not to mention, they’re a great way to look up unique recipes and gifts for get-togethers everyone will be sure to love. You can’t go wrong!

Now you can check out magazines with OverDrive. If you haven’t already, download the OverDrive app to your device as well as the Libby app, which will make reading and checkout so much easier for you. The best part (besides no late fees)? There is no wait time for magazines! As soon as you check out a magazine, it will be available for you to download, even if other patrons have the magazine checked out. You will never have to wait!

Happy Reading!

Stan Lee 1922-2018

Stanley Martin Lieber, aka Stan Lee, was born on December 28, 1922 in NYC to two Romanian immigrants. During most of his childhood, he grew up during the Great Depression with his younger brother, Larry. Stanley Lieber, who later changed his name to Lee, went on to be hired as an assistant at Timeley Comics in ’39 and quickly became an acting editor for the company in the early 1940s. Lee also served in the Army during World War 2 from home, working as a writer and illustrator.

 In the early 1960s, Marvel Comics (Timely’s new name) called upon Lee to create a new series that could compete with Justice League of America, from Marvel’s rivals, DC Comics. Lee cites that he was influenced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Jules Verne, while receiving encouragement of his wife, Lee did away with the normal conventional ideas of a superhero and with the help of co-creator Jack Kirby, came up with Fantastic Four in 1961.

Following the Fantastic Four, was a huge group of new characters from Lee and his Marvel legions. This includes the Hulk, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, Daredevil and the X-Men.

He was mainly known for imbuing his characters with a sense of humanity, tackling real-world issues like drug use and bigotry, which continues to influence comics. As an outgoing and humorous man, Lee developed many slogans including a “Excelsior!”, a Latin word to rise.

As Marvel Comics grew in popularity, Stan Lee was promoted to editorial director and publisher in ’72. He eventually moved to the West coast to be more involved in Marvel’s films and he eventually retired but could continue to be chairman of Marvel.

Eventually, Lee became involved in many different multimedia projects while serving as an ambassador for Marvel, even while filing lawsuits against the company and the subject of debate over appropriate compensation for comic creators. Lee has watched Marvel develop into a leading entity by inspiring blockbuster films in entertainment like X-Men and the Avengers franchises.  He started his own company called POW! Entertainment in 2001 and eventually published his autobiography, Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee. 

He eventually received the Medal of Arts honor from President Bush and launched Stan Lee’s Superhumans  on the History Channel. The show looked at people with remarkable skills and remarkable abilities.

The very active 90 year old, Stan Lee lost his wife of nearly 70 years, Joan, in July of 2017. He then checked into a hospital with an irregular heartbeat and shortness of breath the following January giving many comic book fans and movie fans a scare! He was shortly discharged and announced he was ready to continue as Black Panther, was soon to be released.

On November 12, 2018, the world lost a magnificently creative man. The world weeped as the knowledge of never seeing another cameo of Stan Lee in anymore Marvel movies came to light.

The Aurora Public Library District owns many Marvel movies and currently has a display up on the first level in the JFic area. Please, feel free to check any item on the display out to celebrate Stan Lee’s life!

 

Information Derived from the following websites:

https://www.biography.com/

https://d23.com/walt-disney-legend/stan-lee/

The Best Books of 2018

Are you looking to give your favorite bibliophile a gift they’ll never forget this holiday season? How about one of the best books of 2018?

Here is a list of some of the best books (fiction and nonfiction) published this year that would make perfect gifts for the book lovers in your life:

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

How to Write an Autobiographical Novel: Essays by Alexander Chee

French Exit by Patrick DeWitt

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

The Room on Rue Amélie by Kristen Harmel

The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

The Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zynab Joukhadar

The Outsider by Stephen King

The Opposite of Hate: A Field Guide to Repairing Our Humanity by Sally Kohn

As Bright as Heaven by Susan Meissner

Circe by Madeline Miller

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

There There by Tommy Orange

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

The President is Missing by James Patterson and Bill Clinton

You’re on an Airplane by Parker Posey

You Think It, I’ll Say It by Curtis Sittenfeld

Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer

You can never go wrong with the gift of a book! Follow the links to check out certain titles from the Aurora Public Library District yourself!

If you’re looking for a bargain, then look no further than the Dillsboro Public Library Book Sale! For the rest of November, fill up as many bags as you want with books and only pay $1 per each bag! The Book Sale is ongoing whenever the Library is open, so be sure to stop in and browse even if you miss the November deadline. The third Friday and Saturday of every month is also the $1 Per Bag Sale, but you better hurry in now before everything is gone!

What books would you add to this list? We’re always looking for recommendations to add to our own collection!

Happy Reading!

Kids Love Non-Fiction!

You’ve probably noticed changes in our library buildings as we’ve rearranged some of our collections. The biggest change is that we have created an area for children’s non-fiction books at both the Aurora Public Library and the Dillsboro Public Library. We want kids to be able to find books that interest them more easily, without having to search through shelves that also have the “adult” stuff. We’ve also been adding some great new titles to keep our collection current and interesting. In this area, you’ll find everything from coding to science, from sign language to sports, and from religion to music. As always, we’re here to help you find what you and your children are interested in!

There are advantages to reading a mixture of books types, both fiction and non-fiction. Letting your child’s interests guide the selection is always a great way to keep them engaged with books. Here are a couple of interesting articles about reading non-fiction. The first is from a father’s perspective – how he discovered that non-fiction satisfied his daughter’s desire to learn about the world around her. The second article is from an educational perspective and discusses how reading non-fiction can increase comprehension of complex texts.

Here are some of our newest titles, but you really need to stop by and let your kids browse the collection to spark their interest!

Technology and science books are always popular, and we have lots of science project books to keep the kids busy during school breaks.

Drones by Elsie Olson

Science Maker Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “Scientists in the Field” series is great for older students and even adults. Each title in the series focuses on the work being done by scientists in a particular field.

Backyard Bears by Amy Cherrix

Read about a favorite athlete, or learn new techniques for playing a sport.

Aaron Judge by Jon M. Fishman  Breanna Stewart by Jon M. Fishman  My First Soccer Handbook by Clive Gifford

From domestic to exotic, we have everything you need to know about animals!

Baby Animals by Dorothea DepriscoSugar Gliders by Paula M. Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baking with kids encourages reading, teaches math skills, and leads to a healthy appetite!Good Housekeeping Kids Bake!

 

Explore the past with our great history books. In addition to The Underground Railroad, Kay Winter’s Voices series also includes Colonial Voices and Voices from the Oregon Trail.

   Machu Picchu by Christina Leaf     Voices from the Underground Railroad by Kay Winters

Baking with APLD

Listen, now is not the time to go on a diet. The holidays are staring us right in the face and the cold weather is making us layer up, so the time is right to experiment with all kinds of baking. The Aurora Public Library District can help! Instead of going out and buying tons of cookbooks you’ll only flip through once, check out up to ten cookbooks at a time for two weeks (+ two renewals on top of that = a potential month and a half of borrowing a book).

(Since I let you in on that little secret, you now have to bring me a sample of whatever it is you bake.)

The cookbooks begin on the nonfiction shelves with the call numbers 641. If you’re anything like me, you’ll easily get lost in the cookbooks, so it might be more fun for you to browse in person rather than going through our online catalog. But you can certainly do both! Personally, I can’t wait to check out American Cookie by Anne Byrn.

Maybe you’re looking to experiment with baking bread. We have all sorts of books with recipes for bakers of all levels.

 

Or maybe you want to start making more pies, tarts, or brownies. These might be some of the most underrated items of all the baked goods, in my opinion.

 

What about cakes? We have tons of titles on baking and decorating cakes to help you hone your skills. There are tons of new flavors to try too, instead of just plain white or chocolate cake. You can experiment with fillings and various flavor combinations to your heart’s content.

 

And we can’t forget about cookies! There plenty of titles for you to check out about all kinds of cookies, too, whether you’re looking for cake mix cookies, no-bake cookies, Christmas cookies, and more.

 

If you have little ones, we also have lots of books for baking and cooking with children. You’ll love spending time with children, making memories, and helping them learn new skills. Plus, with kids, anything goes, so that means you get to lick the batter, too! (I would have done that normally, but this isn’t about me.)

Maybe you’d rather browse online for recipes. Sign on to one of our public computers with your library card to scour the Internet to your heart’s content. If you need to print a recipe off, it’s only $.10 per black and white page or $1.00 per color page. You can also make copies directly from the books with our public copy machines.

It’s getting colder and the weather might start to get a little dicey, so you might not want to make the trip to the Library. We understand, and you’re in luck because you can also download baking titles digitally straight to your device from the Indiana Digital Download Center with OverDrive. Flip through digital recipe books and screenshot the images so you can have the recipes forever.

I want to help you hibernate this winter surrounded by baked goods and comfort food. So, Happy Reading! (And Eating!)

A Not-So-Merry GRINCHmas!!

There’s a new movie release of The Grinch this month, but I can’t help it if I still love the original version, How the Grinch Stole Christmas. This 1966 animated TV film was the first adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ book of the same name, and starred Boris Karloff as both the narrator and the wonderfully wicked voice of the Grinch.

The Grinch has certainly become an icon of Christmas since the book was released in 1957, despite the character’s hatred of the season. We know that the Grinch, annoyed by the noisy Christmas festivities that take place in Whoville, decides to devise a wicked scheme to steal the Who’s presents, trees, and food for their Christmas feast. When the Grinch hears the residents of Whoville singing a joyous song, rather than lamenting over the loss of their Christmas goodies, he realizes that “maybe Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”

Who can resist watching the original version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas just one more time, enjoying Grinch treats, playing games and making a Grinch ornament to take home? Tweens and Teens (ages 11-18) are invited to spend an evening at the Aurora Branch Library, on Thursday, December 13, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, for A Not-So-Merry GRINCHmas, to celebrate all things Grinch-y.

Register now by calling 812-926-0646 to save your spot in Aurora Branch Library’s own Whoville.